Our paper was rejected multiple times; several months later, another group published similar results in Nature. Though some details were different, the main logic and key points of the research were the same.

A reviewer of our paper said our work lacked “broad leadership” – this critique does not make sense to me. Is this because there are no “big guys” in our paper? Or our figures were not enough to impress the editors? Or because our university is not famous enough?

I’m a postdoc having a difficult relationship with my adviser. Rather unexpectedly, he started literally bombarding me with all sorts of mostly unjustified accusations, including that I’m not productive enough and all sorts of personality-related complaints. I’m in the process of applying to a new postdoc. Will have the first interview in 1.5 days. Given the present situation, I don’t expect a good recommendation letter from my adviser. However, I already listed him among my recommendations.

What should I do?

  • A. Not say anything about the relationship with my present adviser during the interview.

  • Be upfront an mention that I have a poor relationship with my adviser and can provide more details if needed.

I’m quite confident I’m treated unfairly and can explain the situation to my advantage.

I talked to 2 professors which I trust and both of them suggested I should not say anything about this in the first interview. One of them thinks that I might get a good LOR after all; this is his justification. I would prefer not to rely on this. Thus, I don’t know what is the best option. I will get another, strong recommendation letter from a very reputable professor who helped me in the past.

Any prompt help would be greatly appreciated. This is a follow-up to my previous question.

We have submitted an article 10 months ago to a journal which is still under review. We have made few extension/improvement to the submitted article.
can we submit the extended version of an under review article to another journal? How can we cite the work presented in under review article?
Do we need to inform the both editors regrading submission of extended version?

One of my colleagues at my institution, Prof. A, is the editor of a journal, Journal X, (and I am not involved in the journal in any way). I received an email by a professor, Prof. B, who had submitted two articles to Journal X and accuses Prof. A. of intentionally delaying the publication of these articles by not handling them properly. Prof. B claims that Prof. A did not answer his queries per email and that another editor of Journal X also did not answer his emails. The email I got from Prof. B was openly targeted to several other colleagues at my institution and also to a number of other people I do not know and also to Prof A. At the end of his email, Prof. B asks me (and the others – more or less verbatim) “Is this attitude of Prof. A normal or are there any unethical elements […]?” and to “join in this story”.

I found it disturbing that Prof. B wrote such an email to such an audience and I would say that his way of addressing the situation was not ok. However, I wonder what my reaction should be. Normally, I would just stop by at Prof. A’s office, but I am on sabbatical leave so this is not an option. I do not know more details about the issue of the publication, but I think that these do not really matter in this case, as I only want to ask about what I should do:

  • Should I answer Prof. B that this way of addressing the issue was not ok?
  • Should I inform Prof. A that I found this email inappropriate?
  • Should I just act as if I haven’t read this email?

I would especially appreciate answers from people with experience on an editorial board, but other guiding comments are also helpful.

In one of my required undergraduate courses, my professor has given a mandatory assignment. He has indicated that he will use our code from the assignment for his research. He has not mentioned attributing it, nor asked our permission to use the code.

I’m not opposed to him using the code for his research, but I want to guarantee that if he does, I will be attributed. Is there a good way to go about this? Furthermore, is it acceptable for a professor to use student code from required class projects for research?

(there was a similar question here but did not apply, since it dealt with commercial uses, and another here but did not include the fact that the course was required for the major.)

One of my colleagues at my institution, Prof. A, is the editor of a journal, Journal X, (and I am not involved in the journal in any way). I received an email by a professor, Prof. B, who had submitted two articles to Journal X and accuses Prof. A. to intentionally delay the publication of these articles by not handling them properly. Prof. B claims that Prof. A did not answer his queries per email and that also another editor of Journal X did not answer his emails. The email I got from Prof. B was openly targeted to several other colleagues at my institution but also to a number of other people I do not know and also to Prof A. In the end of his email, Prof. B asks me (and the others – more or less verbatim) “Is this attitude of Prof. A normal or are there any unethical elements […]?” and to “join in this story”.

I found it disturbing that Prof. B wrote such an email to such an audience and I would say that his way to address the situation was not ok. However, I wonder what my reaction should be. Normally, I would just stop by at Prof. A’s office, but I am on sabbatical leave so this is not an option. I do not know more details about the issue of the publication, but I think that these do not really matter in this case, as I only want to ask about what I should do:

  • Should I answer Prof. B that this way to address the issue was not ok?
  • Should I inform Prof. A that I found this email inappropriate?
  • Should I just do as if I haven’t read this email?

I would especially appreciate answers from people with experience on an editorial board, but other guiding comment are also helpful.