As of this week, when I do an exact phrase search in Google (putting the phrase in quotes), I no longer get results with the exact phrases highlighted in bold. Instead, the results show pages with related terms in the titles. One or two may or may not have the exact phrase in the sample text. When I open some of the pages, the exact phrases aren’t in the text. This is also true in Google Scholar, though to a lesser extent.

Has Google made some change to the search engine?

After finishing my bachelor’s degree, I received a fellowship via my home university to conduct independent research at a university of my choosing. All of my living expenses and stipend were taken care of by this fellowship, and the project I worked on was my proposal. I reached out to professor Z to see if he would host me and supervise the project if I were to receive the fellowship, and he said yes.

I’m now applying to PhD programs, one of which gives the option to submit a research writing sample. I would like to submit the final report I wrote up on my project, but I’m not sure if it requires my advisor’s permission. This report would presumably be shared among the graduate admissions committee.

Some other possibly relevant info: there are no plans at this time to publish the results. The project wrapped up over a year ago now. There is no ongoing research on this topic in professor Z’s research group (which I know because I keep in contact with a few students in his group). The report does not (to the best of my knowledge) contain any information on ongoing projects within Z’s research group.

The deadline for my application is soon and I haven’t received a response from my advisor yet (which is my fault for not asking him sooner, but not relevant to the actual question I’m asking). If he doesn’t respond, I’ve told myself that I won’t submit it. I have actual published work that the committee can pull up if they like, I just thought it would be a plus to show the results of a research project that didn’t lead to any publication, but which highlights my research abilities anyway.

I’m curious though what the etiquette is in this case. Would it be a major faux pas for me to submit this writing sample with my application?

My undergraduate student told me that he got some problems when he attended the lab session in our department. This lab session is mandatory and one of the component of the course evaluation.
The source of the problem are the lab assistants. They asked him many irrelevant questions about their student union, like the name of the chair, secretary, etc. Unfortunately, he is not a member of this union, so he can not answer it. Therefore, they fail him and he has to retake the test.

I want to help my student.
Previously, I considered to report this case to the chair. However, I remembered that my chair once said that he did not like the student who do not join the student union. Hence, I did not report to him.

Do you know the best way to solve this problem with minimum effort?
For further information, the university is located in a developing country in South East Asia.

On my web page, I ask students who want a letter of recommendation to talk with me about it. I also ask for specific information, such as what classes they took, how they distinguished themselves, etc. The purpose, of course, is to write strong letters for the good students and to encourage others to ask someone else.

Today I received an automated LOR request (from the institution to which he applied) for a student who graduated years ago from a different institution. I know from my own records how he did in my classes, but I have no other information available. I have no contact information for the student.

I can write a semi-strong letter based on grades alone, I can ask the institution to which he applied for contact information, or I can continue to try to track him down some other way. (I’ve already tried the usual methods of Google, Facebook, etc.)

Should I write the semi-strong letter, contact the institution to which he applied, or do some third thing.

So I want to do a PhD in Finance eventually and I need your advice regarding my MSc level studies.

I graduated from the University of Reading with a First Class Honours (only in Management and Business though), and now I am a risk analyst at a top investment bank.

I plan to do two MSc programmes (one Finance and one with significant Economics content) before my PhD application to make up for my lack of Econ/Quant focus during my undergraduate studies. But the problem is that I don’t have unlimited funds at my disposal, so since I am an EU citizen, I have started looking at Dutch universities. The three I am currently considering are the University of Amsterdam, Tilburg and Maastricht.

As far as I know UvA is the highest ranked overall, but Tilburg has a good reputation in academia for its Economics department…and Maastricht has a MSc Financial Economics programme (which looks good if you don’t have an Econ undergrad and you plant to do a PhD) and it is a decent uni.

The most important for me is the academic orientation of the course, the research focus of the university, and its reputation within academia (I am not motivated by a brand name uni just because its name).

So my questions are:

-Could you tell me anything about these universities and which one
would be the most suitable for my purposes (even though the limited
information you have about me and my goals)?

How should I go about getting a PhD offer with my educational background (I am mostly interested in behavioural finance and asymmetric information)?

-Can you recommend any alternative MSc courses?

Thank you very much for any advice you may give.

I recently sent a paper to a journal which has now been reviewed by 2 reviewers. Both of them have some good points that I should change. However, both reviewers also suggest to include specific papers to “enhance” my paper.

However: These papers are barely related to my paper.

  • In case of reviewer 1 the whole research group of the papers suggested by this reviewer is identical for each paper.
  • In case of reviewer 2 five papers have been suggested. Even though different authors are listed two identical authors appear on each of these papers. Sometimes as a first author, sometimes not. But it seems obvious to me that one of these two authors must be reviewer 2.

I don’t know how to deal with that. Should I write the editor? Should I ignore their suggestions? Should I include at least one of these references to make them happy? Their general opinion about our paper was good.

On my web page, I ask students who want a letter of recommendation to talk with me about it. I also ask for specific information, such as what classes they took, how they distinguished themselves, etc. The purpose, of course, is to write strong letters for the good students and to encourage others to ask someone else.

Today I received an automated LOR request (from the institution to which he applied) for a student who graduated years ago from a different institution. I know from my own records how he did in my classes, but I have no other information available. I have no contact information for the student.

I can write a semi-strong letter based on grades alone, I can ask the institution to which he applied for contact information, or I can continue to try to track him down some other way. (I’ve already tried the usual methods of Google, Facebook, etc.)

Should I write the semi-strong letter, contact the institution to which he applied, or do some third thing.

I’m currently working on a Spanish paper in MLA for an undergraduate course and have stumbled on some confusion for my Works Cited for which I can find no definitive answer. MLA says that I should use the header “Works Cited” before my citations, but does this still apply for other languages? Should I put “La bibliografía” or “Las referencias bibliográficas” instead? Thank you!