Can someone tell me please how good is research funding of the faculty members in China. I am interested in natural science field. For example, will the 100.000 USD $ per year grant be considered a good funding opportunity. What are the approximate grant size and grant success rate in natural sciences in National Natural Science Foundation of China?

Thanks a lot!

I’m applying for a few months long internship in one (small) research group at a large university. I’m a maths student.

The institution is prestigious, the members of the research group are brilliant. Their research is in the area of mathematics I’m interested in, but in a different subarea than the one I’ve worked into until now. But I’m very willing to learn and start working on new topics.

I’m required to write a statement of purpose about my motivations to join the group. Since I don’t have a deep knowledge of their research work (although I have some experience in other topics in the same macroarea), I feel like my statement is going to be weak and shallow.

What kind of things are professors looking for in a prespective intern
statement of purpose?

What kind of things should a strong statement include?

I am at a difficult position. I work in a major software/telecommunications company, and pursue a doctoral degree at the same time. The company has strict policies against competing behavior. I have implemented a lot of core Internet component code at my free time, but the company would consider releasing those under an open source license as competing behavior. I won’t consider changing the employer, as the salary is acceptable, the job is extremely interesting and I frequently get good extra payments for all of the inventions I have made.

However, I have managed to obtain publication permission for several articles given that main algorithms are only explained as pseudocode. Because my core Internet component is over 20 000 lines of code, I of course cannot explain all as pseudocode.

I would like to submit articles related to this to major IEEE computer society and communications society journals. I would like the reviewers have ability to assess that all experiments have been performed correctly, and thus see the source code for the experiments made in the articles. But I cannot according to the company policy publish the source code to all readers.

Now, what I would like to have is review-only supplemental material. Supplemental material that only the reviewers can assess, and that the journal can store for their private use (e.g. for verification of results if there’s a suspicion of scientific misconduct), but not available publicly for all readers.

Is this kind of review-only supplemental material in general possible? I wouldn’t be surprised to find if the answer was “no”, as it makes it impossible for regular readers to work as unsolicited reviewers, publishing their own commentary on the results in the process.

Of course the answer can depend on the circumstances and the journal, so perhaps asking the editor would be a good option. But I believe this question may have more general value, and thus, I am asking it here as well.

I teach engineering at a community college in the US. I currently have a student with very poor hygiene. He stinks pretty badly, has obviously greasy hair, doesn’t change his clothes frequently, and I usually seat him in the back of the room (during exams and labs, when I have power over seating arrangements) so I don’t have to smell his (relatively strong) body odor.

This student has also spoke with a colleague of mine about his low self-esteem. He’s worried that he isn’t making friends, and doesn’t know if the people he hangs out with are hanging out with him because they want something from him (help with classwork) or because they are truly friends.

In my opinion, this student follows me around like a puppy, and he tries too hard to impress people (students and faculty alike). I am a young-ish female faculty member and I try to create very large boundaries especially with my male students. As an example, he frequently finds the need to explain to me (in way too much detail) why he gets questions wrong on exams (I don’t care, and I don’t need to know, which I’ve told him several times to no success).

So, I would like to mention to this student that his hygiene is off-putting and isn’t helping him out in the friends department. However, because he already follows me around like a puppy dog, I don’t want to encourage any more interaction from him. Additionally, it frankly embarrasses me to have to bring up hygiene issues with somebody in their late teens / early twenties. How can I bring this issue up while still maintaining my boundary as a female faculty member who doesn’t want her male students following her around and asking her for advice all the time?

I was hoping that I would be finished up with this student by now, but I am the only professor who teaches EE courses, so I can’t recommend him to take classes with someone else, or ask another colleague to discuss this with him. He will be taking another of my courses next semester and I don’t personally know any of his other intended professors next semester to ask them to bring it up.

At my large American university, we have the opportunity to fill out course evaluations. They are not mandatory and are allegedly anonymous. I wrote a negative review for Dr. Smith’s course. I stand behind what I wrote and it is all true, but it was scathing and lengthy (over 1500 words) since I listed in detail almost every thing I didn’t like and why, with specific examples. If it matters, my main complaints were that I consider his class to be too easy, his standards were too low, and that he took a long time to grade our assignments.

I received an email from the chair of the department asking me to meet with him to discuss the evaluation. The content of my evaluation is all true, but I am embarrassed that my identity was revealed (or correctly assumed) since I would have been less harsh if I was aware the anonymity wasn’t guaranteed. It wouldn’t surprise me if they guessed I wrote the review, since I made by far the highest grade in the class and had actually complained about Dr. Smith in the middle of the semester to the chair since Dr. Smith allowed something unfair to happen during the midterm. (I was advised by other faculty to bring that specific complaint, so I hope it doesn’t come off that I like to complain.)

What should I do and can anything negative happen to me over this?

We recently received a “revision” notification for a submission in a good journal. The reviewers raised a few valid concerns. In addition to the reviews, the notification e-mail also contained a summary by the editor. The editor asked us to make a change which was not explicitly requested by any of the reviewers, but could be read as a wrong interpretation of one particular reviewer comment. Performing the change would take a substantial amount of work.

Would we hurt our chances if we didn’t address the editor’s summary, including the comment?

I am taking an online accredited course at Illinois and I need to have someone in South America proctor a test (preferably Bolivia, Argentina, or Chile).

Anyone have any suggestions for how to accomplish this? I’ve looked on many websites (including universities and libraries) and struggling to find a resource. Maybe it’s more informal? This test will need to be a physical test.

My course specifically puts these requirements for a proctor. There may be wiggle room with some communication.

  • Principal or Superintendent of Educational Service Region, School, or District

  • Dean, Academic Department Head, Extension or Correspondence Administrator, Registrar, or Official Testing Service of an Accredited University or College

  • Education Officer (Armed Services Personnel Only)

  • Full-Time High School or College Instructor

  • Librarian at your local community library

Specific details on proctor information is here.

At my large American university, we have the opportunity to fill out course evaluations. They are not mandatory and are allegedly anonymous. I wrote a negative review for Dr. Smith’s course. I stand behind what I wrote and it is all true, but it was scathing and lengthy (over 1500 words) since I listed in detail almost every thing I didn’t like and why, with specific examples. If it matters, my main complaints were that I consider his class to be too easy, his standards were too low, and that he took a long time to grade our assignments.

I received an email from the chair of the department asking me to meet with him to discuss the evaluation. The content of my evaluation is all true, but I am embarrassed that my identity was revealed (or correctly assumed) since I would have been less harsh if I was aware the anonymity wasn’t guaranteed. It wouldn’t surprise me if they guessed I wrote the review, since I made by far the highest grade in the class and had actually complained about Dr. Smith in the middle of the semester to the chair since Dr. Smith allowed something unfair to happen during the midterm. (I was advised by other faculty to bring that specific complaint, so I hope it doesn’t come off that I like to complain.)

What should I do and can anything negative happen to me over this?