I maintain a technical blog (posts are in direct correspondence with my interested field of study) which has around 150000 followers. I have two questions:

(a) Do I mention the number of followers in my SOP/CV?

(b) Would mentioning the fact that I maintain this technical blog have any impact in admissions? (or do I even mention the blog in my CV/SOP?)

Thanks !

I have an admission from Oxford University DPhil (CSE) . I also have a job in Silicon Valley with a startup that is a well funded late stage venture . Which one should I choose ? I am looking for insights in Visa differences , Rewards after the Dphil vs the current rewards I will get from the job. I am aware that I might not get the same salary in UK as in US . I am also aware that Oxford itself has great prestige. So my question also weighs prestige against money in my opinion.

In the United States, if anyone, be it a relative, a colleague, potential employer, or colleague, requests to the pertinent department, in the university I study/ied in, certain information about myself, will they be able to have it?

Is all this information, such as grades, year, internships I applied to, if I live(d) in a fraternity or dorms, etc., under the same regulation; or does each of them have its own set of restrictions regarding disclosure?

Finally, does that still apply to international students and/or people who have already graduated and thus are no longer in the institution? There is indeed the Buckley Amendment (FERPA), but it only covers educational records.

I’m in the throes of writing my first substantial research paper in the field of Information Science. The topic looks promising and my advisor seems pleased with the work. Because of the nature of the work, there are a lot of intermediate steps involved in obtaining the raw data, preprocessing the data, then running the experiment proper and recording the results. These intermediate steps involved a lot of programming on my part, building one-shot tools to solve problems along the way to conducting the experiments.

I understand that reproducibility is a huge issue in computer science and I wish to lesson the burden upon my future self and upon my lab mates if/when the time comes to follow up on this trail of experiments. Certain software has to be installed, path variables have to be configured, firewall settings have to be set up to allow transference of data – and similar technical problems that wouldn’t be appropriate to include in the resultant research paper proper.

How do I record all of these technical and procedural steps such that a future interested party (be it myself or one of my lab mates, or perhaps even an outsider to the lab who has an academic interest in the resultant paper and software) can reproduce the experiment? Do I leave myself open to being “scooped” if I set up a website with an academic blog or wiki in it?

As an undergraduate student, I wrote a science paper. Because I was learning to write, I used the form and structure of a paper on a completely different topic; in fact, it was a slightly different discipline all together. So my paper has a similar layout, transitions, and structure as said author, though no information/content/subject matter/ or topic is the same.

Unfortunately, years later I published the paper in a non-peer reviewed publication, and it was not until I googled my name and compared the two articles that I saw the similar language. I totally freaked out and immediately contacted the author of the original piece.

The author told me that I had not stolen ideas or scholarship, since no content or subject matter is the same, so assured me that it is no big deal. He told me it was inappropriate but not a big deal and that there was no reason to retract the article. He said I was over reacting because of my stress of graduate school and that I should shake it off and move on. He also said that I had not violated him and that he learned prose and structure from his professors anyway.

Still a month has passed and my anxiety over this has not passed. Is this an issue that I should bring to the editor? I was willing to retract the article and it was the author who has said I shouldn’t; I’d rather lose my reputation than harm someone else, and I mean it. It was a stupid undergraduate mistake, where I knew to cite my sources but somehow overlooked citing a form of a paper (actually the author told me I didn’t need to cite his paper; just should have rewritten a few of the sentences). I wrote the author back about this, and he again repeated that I should shake it off.

What do you think? Should articles be retracted for this? What is my moral duty?

Edit: It’s not just the formal template that I followed, but the language – i.e. transition words. The order of the introduction is the same, for example. I said why the world needs the paper in a similar language even though there was two totally different topics and subject matters. It was inappropriate, now maybe we don’t retract articles for this sort of thing, I don’t know.

Simply put, if anyone, be it a colleague, relative, potential employer, or colleague, requests to the pertinent department, in the university I study/ied in, certain information about myself, will it be able to have it?

These informations, such as grades, year, internships I applied to, if I live(d) in a fraternity or dorms, etc, are all under the same regulation; or do each of them have their own set of restriction regarding disclosure?

Finally, does that still apply to international students and/or people who have already (under)graduated and thus are no longer in the institution? There is indeed the Buckley Amendment (FERPA), but it only covers educational records.

PS: regarding USA norms

I’m in the throws of writing my first substantial research paper in the field of Information Science. The topic looks promising and my advisor seems pleased with the work. Because of the nature of the work, there are a lot of intermediate steps involved in obtaining the raw data, preprocessing the data, then running the experiment proper and recording the results. These intermediate steps involved a lot of programming on my part-building one-shot tools to solve problems along the way to conducting the experiments.

I understand that reproducibility is a huge issue in computer science and I wish to lesson the burdon upon my future self and upon my lab mates if/when the time comes to follow up on this trail of experiments. Certain software has to be installed, path variables have to be configured, firewall settings have to be set up to allow transference of data – and similar technical problems that wouldn’t be appropriate to include in the resultant research paper proper.

How do I record all of these technical and procedural steps such that a future interested party (be it myself or one of my lab mates -perhaps even an outsider to the lab who has an academic interest in the resultant paper and software) can reproduce the experiment? Do I leave myself open to being “scooped” if I set up a website with an academic blog or wiki in it?