I have an experiment where I am having participants rate the readability of 10 different texts. I have 37 participants and I would like them to rate the readability for 6 texts each so that each text will be rated by at least 20 different people. However, I’m concerned about order effects in the presentation of the texts so I would like to use a Latin square design. Is there any way that I can modify the Latin square design so that I could present 6 texts to each participant rather than all ten?

Today we (professors + teaching assistants) proctored a midterm exam for a class of about 80 students. There was undoubtedly a “hardest” question on the exam, since nearly the entire classroom of students asked us how to proceed with that question. To be fair, we didn’t give any hints, but it was clear that one had to use a definition to be able to proceed.

When we collected the exams, all of the exam booklets had that question unanswered — except for one student’s exam. And this was the only student who asked to go to the bathroom. I gave him permission to go, but I did not ask for his phone, which I now highly regret.

What can we do in this situation, in which I strongly suspect that this student went to the bathroom to look up a definition on his phone, so that he could answer the question correctly?

We still have to look at every exam to be sure that only one student got it right (the bathroom student), but if this were indeed the case, do we have any power to accuse him of cheating, or, have we missed our chance by not asking for him to leave his phone in the room?

I feel a big injustice will have been done to the rest of the honest students, if we let this one slide …

Last year I completed an exam at University and a friend is doing the same exam/class this year.
Would it be cheating if I gave her my revision notes of the semester (written before I did the exam)? They don’t have any exam-related answers, just summarized lecture notes.
I read that it is cheating if a student has an unfair advantage over other students.
I don’t want to get her or myself in trouble.

Thank you.

I am a hopeless and frustrated university student in second year.I do not know whether I should stay in math major with low GPA?What are the signs indicating the need of a change of major?I seems to be weak in math ability compared with others.In addition, sleep and concentration problem plague me a lot.In the beginning of undergraduate education, I indeed had passion in math.But afterwards, things turn badly.Maybe one reason is lack of sleep and bad habits.I have to travel a long way between college and my home every day.I skip lectures a lot in order to give more time to self-study and doing assignments.Due to this unpleasant undergraduate experience, I sometimes have the thought of dropout.(or waiting to be forced to leave)
Maybe I should take math as an amateur interest?Maybe I should leave the university?If the situation continues like this ,sometimes I think I would end up with being a waiter or cashier struggling to make a living as the employability of math students (especially pure math students with low GPA) seems to be low.What changes should I try to make?I think after this semester my average cumulative GPA will fall below 3 or even worse.I think my undergraduate experience reduces to “waiting to be assessed”.Most of time I just study alone.I feel like the only things I gain from university is the resources of library and a quiet place to study.What is the implications of entering the job market before re-entering university?

I am a hopeless and frustrated university student in second year.I do not know whether I should stay in math major with low GPA?What are the signs indicating the need of a change of major?I seems to be weak in math ability compared with others.In addition, sleep and concentration problem plague me a lot.In the beginning of undergraduate education, I indeed had passion in math.But afterwards, things turn badly.Maybe one reason is lack of sleep and bad habits.I have to travel a long way between college and my home every day.I skip lectures a lot in order to give more time to self-study and doing assignments.Due to this unpleasant undergraduate experience, I sometimes have the thought of dropout.(or waiting to be forced to leave)
Maybe I should take math as an amateur interest?Maybe I should leave the university?If the situation continues like this ,sometimes I think I would end up with being a waiter or cashier struggling to make a living as the employability of math students (especially pure math students with low GPA) seems to be low.What changes should I try to make?I think after this semester my average cumulative GPA will fall below 3 or even worse.I think my undergraduate experience reduces to “waiting to be assessed”.Most of time I just study alone.I feel like the only things I gain from university is the resources of library and a quiet place to study.

First off apologies if this is in the wrong section, I’m new to this site. I had a few questions regarding graduate school admissions, so I figured this would be the right place to ask.

Basically I’m in a dilemma. I’m currently wrapping up my bachelor in mathematics this semester, and was considering applying for schools this year. However my advisor recommended that if I want to get into a top 15 institution I should finish a masters first due to our school being relatively unknown. I have already taken his advice and started my masters in mathematics, and I should have that complete by next year’s application cycle. Now my question is will the masters make that big of a difference with regards to my application, or would I have been better off just applying to mid-tier schools this time around and save the tuition money/time?

The rest of my application looks roughly like this (so far at least):

Math B.A., Chemistry B.A., Math M.A.

UG GPA: 3.6 overall, 3.95 in math,

Grad GPA: 3.8 (so far)

I have done two research projects, one of which is in the works of getting published the other is ongoing and quite extensive in numerical analysis.

GRE/Subject GRE – Have yet to take, will do so soon.

Recommendation Letters: Two professors with degrees from top 15 schools, one of which I have taken many courses with and done research with. Also the chair of the department.

Thank you, and once again sorry if this is in the wrong section.

When a candidate is applying for a faculty position and the university asks for their reference letters, does this say anything about the chance of getting an interview? Obviously it’s not a bad thing. But have they made the short list? Does this mean the application wasn’t desk rejected (but nothing more)? Are they in the top 25%? 50%? Something else? This is a social sciences department in the United States.

When submitting papers to scientific journals, it makes sense to aim slightly above the paper’s level – after all, if you submit too high, you get rejected and can resubmit, while if you submit too low you end up just publishing there. Or so it seems to me.

An extreme strategy (which is equally impractical and evil) would be to make a list of all journals ranked from best to worst, and keep submitting to the highest ranking one that you haven’t tried yet, until one of them accepts. With a strategy like that, the chance that the paper gets accepted in any particular submission is close to zero. At the other end of the spectrum, if almost all of your submissions are accepted then it’s very likely that you’re selling yourself short.

Now, it’s impossible to know with any level of precision what’s the probability of acceptance of a given paper at any particular journal. But it is possible to observe a general trend, and try to adjust your confidence up or down. Hence, the question:

If one is reasonable in their choice of journals, how frequently should their papers be rejected?

In other words, at what point should I start making a conscious effort to submit to better journals? At which point should I start submitting to worse journals?

For instance, my current strategy is to try and figure out how good a paper is, and first submit to a journal that’s about the best that could possibly accept it, and then go down from that by a small but noticable margin. In a small sample size, about half the time the paper was submitted on the first attempt, and about half the time on the second, and so far I haven’t had to submit anything three times. Hence, my papers get rejected around 33% of the time. Is this a reasonable frequency, or should I be more modest (or possibly more aggressive) in my choice of journals?

My field is pure mathematics, but I’m also interested in perspectives from other fields.

I am a university student.I do not know whether I should stay in math major with low GPA?What are the signs indicating the need of a change of major?I seems to be weak in math ability compared with others.In addition, sleep and concentration problem plague me a lot.In the beginning of undergraduate education, I indeed had passion in math.But afterwards, things turn badly.Maybe one reason is lack of sleep and bad habits.I have to travel a long way between college and my home every day.I skip lectures a lot in order to give more time to self-study and doing assignments.Due to this unpleasant undergraduate experience, I sometimes have the thought of dropout.(or waiting to be forced to leave)
Maybe I should take math as an amateur interest?Maybe I should leave the university?If the situation continues like this ,sometimes I think I would end up with being a waiter or cashier struggling to make a living as the employability of math students (especially pure math students with low GPA) seems to be low.What changes should I try to make?