One might assume by the nature of the subject that the credit system in academia is more credible than in industry or politics, but in conversation with researchers and students following emerged (physics, engineering, computer science):

… PhD students are asked to review papers, without getting officially the credit for it, only to do tasks for which the supervisor is responsible for.

(At the end, he is TPC member. To the argument that the student needs to learn how to review papers or that the supervisor goes through the review before submitting: Many submission systems allow the reassignment of the reviewer or the official invitation of sub-reviweres)

… as researcher (PhD student or PostDoc) your superior might ask you if you can help him to teach a course either entirely or partially. Later on, when you apply, people ask about your teaching experience, and you explain that you had great success and fun helping teaching. So they ask for the student evaluation and you need to explain that you don’t have any because at that time ….. ).

… as researcher then people ask you to supervisor PhD students and you go for the job and do it. Until you find out after hard work that your position as postdoc doesn’t permit you to participate in the PhD supervision committee and that regulations …. So you go to the next job and people consider that you published many papers, but they wonder why you are not first author on the papers and you explain that your task was to supervise students, and then they ask if you were in the PhD supervision committee and you need to explain …. )

… what is about the grants? Are you PI or did you bring in grants? And you reply, yes, I brought in three of my postdoc grants which I wrote completely by my own, but I couldn’t be PI because of regulations and so I wrote it for my boss and he submitted it under his name. I also co-authored five author proposals which got excepted, but because of my position (researcher, scientist, postdoc) I couldn’t be officially part of the team (either as PI or coPI), but I got promised to get hired under the grant when it gets accepted. Well, it got accepted but then they found out that I don’t have enough experience or that the regulations….

Is the credit system in academia flawed?

I am a PhD student in Y university in United States and I finished my MS in X university before my PhD. All professors who provided my recommendation letters work for X. Lately, I have been feeling that I made the wrong choice coming to Y and wanted to go to back to X and talked to my professors from X university. They were very sympathetic to my concerns and agreed to recommend me again for X university. I don’t think I am applying to X anymore and will stay in Y. How do I get back to my professors about this? I wish to maintain a cordial relationship with them.

I recently sat down with a trusted confidant and went over my statement of purpose and personal statement. Although the overall message and commentary was positive, what I realized was that I needed to metaphorically pull myself from the sky and back to earth. In other words, a head-shrinking was in order. My topics were far too lofty to be accomplished in half a decade.

As I continue to procrastinate from writing by asking this question, I wonder how can one ground themselves as they move forward in their graduate education and post-graduate career.

In times past, I’ve came across a blog post by a computer scientist who has made great work into the field of medicine and bioinformatics despite not having a medical background, all in effort of finding a diagnosis and cure for his child’s disease. But I cannot find it.

But what the post didn’t address was to integrate the equivalent of a speed governor into the brain engine on a day to day basis.

How do we keep ourselves humble as researchers and intellectuals?

I will be going to college soon and since I live in an area with few education options, I have very little idea what I would need to do to get into various colleges. Would it be appropriate to email a professor at a given college and ask them what their program requires/likes to see/what skills most good students have? What is the culture at their school? My parents are college professors and I see the ins and outs of academia every single day and I want my college of choice to have certain attributes that are not always obvious from their website.

I recently sat down with a trusted confidant and went over my statement of purpose and personal statement. Although the overall message and commentary was positive, what I realized was that I needed to metaphorically pull myself from the sky and back to earth. In other words, a head-shrinking was in order. My topics were far too lofty to be accomplished in half a decade.

As I continue to procrastinate from writing by asking this question, I wonder how can one ground themselves as they move forward in their graduate education and post-graduate career.

In times past, I’ve came across a blog post by a computer scientist who has made great work into the field of medicine and bioinformatics despite not having a medical background, all in effort of finding a diagnosis and cure for his child’s disease. But I cannot find it.

But what the post didn’t address was to integrate the equivalent of a speed governor into the brain engine on a day to day basis.

How do we keep ourselves humble as researchers and intellectuals?

I recently sat down with a trusted confidant and went over my statement of purpose and personal statement. Although the overall message and commentary was positive, what I realized was that I needed to metaphorically pull myself from the sky and back to earth. In other words, a head-shrinking was in order. My topics were far too lofty to be accomplished in half a decade.

As I continue to procrastinate from writing by asking this question, I wonder how can one ground themselves as they move forward in their graduate education and post-graduate career.

In times past, I’ve came across a blog post by a computer scientist who has made great work into the field of medicine and bioinformatics despite not having a medical background, all in effort of finding a diagnosis and cure for his child’s disease. But I cannot find it.

But what the post didn’t address was to integrate the equivalent of a speed governor into the brain engine on a day to day basis.

How do we keep ourselves humble as researchers and intellectuals?

Our lab is having its holiday party tonight at a somewhat fancy hotel restaurant. How do I address a PI of our lab? I’ve never met her this semester – she spends time at another research institute and communicates with us via group emails.

Given that a party will be a casual meeting, how should I address her? By her first name, say, “hi Karen”, or is it better to address her more formally, such as “hi, Dr. Samsonite”? Our lab consists of about twenty members.

Update

So I met her just a short while ago in her hotel room where she is staying through the weekend, and I decided to adress her as I normally would, thanks Aeismail for the useful tip. She seemed just fine with it, so a big thanks to all for the answers and comments. Party time!

I have a paper uploaded to arXiv which has a really high view count for papers in my field, I know this is the case because it is also published on Researchgate and I still have about 5-10 reads per week after a year of publishing it.

When it was published, there were a lot of buzz around the paper and we received positive feedback. I don’t have the initial estimate but it could be as high as hundreds of reads.

However, I still have not received a citation on the arXiv paper, and it has been almost a year. I do intend to make modification to the paper later next year based on some new findings, and in the process this would clear up some of the “minor” problems in the original paper, including grammar mistakes.

What could be the reason? Could it be that I uploaded it under the wrong category? My research interest is broad and so is the targeted audience, which may have caused this. I don’t know if it is possible for me to pick a new category.

Is it because of the issues within the paper? I can only know after I have revised the paper, but I suspect this may be one of the issues.

Or is it because it is simply on Arxiv?

Whatever the reason, has anyone else experienced this and was there an resolution (e.g., what did you do that caused other people to cite your work)?

Our lab is having its holiday party tonight at a somewhat fancy hotel restaurant. How do I address a PI of our lab? I’ve never met her this semester – she spends time at another research institute and communicates with us via group emails.

Given that a party will be a casual meeting, how should I address her? By her first name, say, “hi Karen”, or is it better to address her more formally, such as “hi, Dr. Samsonite”? Our lab consists of about twenty members.

There’s a story of a picture of Sigmund Freud hanging above a urinal at the Psychiatry Department of Washington University in St. Louis, roughly during the struggle that led to the ousting of most psychoanalytic concepts from the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders).

I had never heard of this type of (bathroom-based) iconoclastic gesture in US academia before reading about that one. Were there other similar incidents in the post-WWII history of US academia? If it’s truly uncommon in this region and time period, then did it happen in other places and times (but still) in academia, e.g. Europe during the 60s, US before the war, etc.?