I am graduating with my Ph.D. very soon. In addition to my thesis and published journal papers, my supervisor required me to copy all my work—code, figure files, data, etc.—to him before my leaving. However, all the works during my PhD have been done by myself from scratch, including the ideas and research gap searching, although he was the co-author of the papers. And my scholarship has been provided by the university. So I feel this requirement is not reasonable.

In fact, my supervisor didn’t like my research topic and we had very little communication during my Ph.D. study. He gave me very little help on my work and was also never interested in my work and research field. In this case, could you suggest me on the following two specific questions:

  1. Should I share all my works with him? If yes, why and if no, how to negotiate with him?

  2. If I can only share partial works with him. What is a good strategy?

In my field (computer science), students often get jobs through referrals, where faculty members pass on the student’s resume to someone employed at the company the student wants to work at. In an annual talk and throughout the year, I advise my students to use referrals if at all possible rather than applying online. I accept LinkedIn requests from my students and encourage them to ask me for referrals.

There is currently a student in our small program who has negatively impressed all of the professors he has taken classes from, as well as many of the students. He is not the weakest CS student, but, in my opinion, he is the worst at getting along with others and behaving professionally.

I am wondering what to do when he asks me to refer him to companies (which I expect him to do). In the past, when a weak student has asked for a referral, I have said that I don’t think they’re ready for the job in question [due to their technical level], recommended that they ask a different professor, or refer them without an explicit recommendation (e.g., “Jane Doe asked me to refer her to SlackJaw.”) I am hesitant to do the latter for this student because I don’t want to hurt my or my school’s reputation by putting forward a candidate who behaves inappropriately. I also dread his reaction if I decline to refer him for a job. I expect that he would get angry and allege persecution. (I’m a tenured full professor, so my job wouldn’t be in danger if he complained about me, but I’d rather not get in that situation.)

In any event, I don’t want to hurt his chances of getting a job. I’m happy to give him job-seeking advice and help him with his resume, but I don’t want to recommend him.

What should I do if he asks me for a referral?

The answers to this popular question were somewhat controversial, but many including @dan-romik whose answer was highly upvoted mentioned that recording a video is a violation of personal privacy and in the US, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

I neither can speak for the OP of that question nor approve his/approach, but the strong stance regarding personal privacy puzzled me. The mentioned question says

We have a youtube channel in which students regularly explain their
achievements.

Point 1: Can the reports of a PhD student recorded in video format?

  • A PhD student normally delivers reports of progress to the
    supervisor. This report can be in verbal or written form.
  • I do not see any problem (including privacy) if the supervisor asks
    the PhD student to deliver his/her report in video format.
  • Alternatively, the supervisor may ask the PhD student to deliver a
    public lecture in the department. Since it is a public lecture,
    anyone can record the presentation unless otherwise strictly stated
    by the organiser.
  • Similarly, the progress could be presented at a conference. Many
    conferences record the presentations.

Point 2: Can a supervisor share the presentations of a PhD student?

  • A research report is not intended for the supervisor’s eyes only. An
    educator cannot share the exam sheet of a student (according to
    FERP), but the story is completely different for a research report.
    The supervisor can/will directly use that report to report to the
    funding agency who funded the PhD project in the first place.

  • The progress report is not only the progress of PhD student but the
    work done in the supervisor’s group. Therefore, it is not odd for the
    supervisor to post the report publicly (e.g., the university website,
    researchgate, etc).

Conclusion: Is video different from writing?

For centuries, academics presented their works in both oral and writing formats. Thanks to Johannes Gutenberg, writings are well recorded for centuries. However, video recording of the presentations is new, a few decades of recording, and one decade of sharing.

As a straightforward question, can someone refuse to appear in any recording because of personal privacy? This can apply to the PhD defence meeting too, as some universities record its video to be stored along with the written dissertation.

The answers to this popular question were somewhat controversial, but many including @dan-romik whose answer was highly upvoted mentioned that recording a video is a violation of personal privacy and in the US, Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

I neither can speak for the OP of that question nor approve his/approach, but the strong stance regarding personal privacy puzzled me. The mentioned question says

We have a youtube channel in which students regularly explain their
achievements.

Point 1: Can the reports of a PhD student recorded in video format?

  • A PhD student normally delivers reports of progress to the
    supervisor. This report can be in verbal or written form.
  • I do not see any problem (including privacy) if the supervisor asks
    the PhD student to deliver his/her report in video format.
  • Alternatively, the supervisor may ask the PhD student to deliver a
    public lecture in the department. Since it is a public lecture,
    anyone can record the presentation unless otherwise strictly stated
    by the organiser.
  • Similarly, the progress could be presented at a conference. Many
    conferences record the presentations.

Point 2: Can a supervisor share the presentations of a PhD student?

  • A research report is not intended for the supervisor’s eyes only. An
    educator cannot share the exam sheet of a student (according to
    FERP), but the story is completely different for a research report.
    The supervisor can/will directly use that report to report to the
    funding agency who funded the PhD project in the first place.

  • The progress report is not only the progress of PhD student but the
    work done in the supervisor’s group. Therefore, it is not odd for the
    supervisor to post the report publicly (e.g., the university website,
    researchgate, etc).

Conclusion: Is video different from writing?

For centuries, academics presented their works in both oral and writing formats. Thanks to Johannes Gutenberg, writings are well recorded for centuries. However, video recording of the presentations is new, a few decades of recording, and one decade of sharing.

As a straightforward question, can someone refuse to appear in any recording because of personal privacy? This can apply to the PhD defence meeting too, as some universities record its video to be stored along with the written dissertation.

WI am mid stage PhD student. I have one doubt about the term ” help ” people use in academia. It is not clear to me the meaning of help in research. I am too much confused about this term. I am a PhD student and I am working on a research problem. Many times I find out that my research supervisor rephrase the research question and some times provide a hint. I am worried because he has a potential that he can solve the research problem at faster rate than me. Or if he gives me more hints than I can solve the research problem at a faster rate.

As a PhD student what I should expect form my research supervisor and what I should not expect from him in research?

Some of the things not to expect are :

  1. Expecting he or she will solve the research problem
  2. Expecting more than 2hours meeting in a week
  3. Expecting supervisor to set-up a next meeting…

Question : What to expect and not to expect from research supervisor in research? I mean how much should I expect in research problem solving?

About a year ago, I finished my Master’s thesis, which was supervised by one professor from my university, and two people from a different university. One of the two is a professor, but he was not involved much in the daily supervision. When finishing up my thesis and presentation, times were quite hectic, and only now I realised I may have never thanked the professor from the other university as he was not present at my presentation. I did approach him for a reference letter later, and thanked him for that when letting him know I got the job.

Now I feel quite rude, but I am not sure if I should do anything. Mostly, I am afraid of it being awkward if I bring this up after a year. Am I overreacting? What would you recommend?

Can I do a master’s thesis with exploratory work without any results? It’s like assume some hypotheses about certain data and testing them. If yes, is that a good thing or a bad thing? Can such a work support me as a good Ph.D. student?

If I didn’t publish anything in my master’s level, and I graduated with such a thesis, would that support me or pointing a red flag against my research skills? Add to this, working as a research assistant during my master’s studies. Would anyone appreciate my failed attempts and hard work yet not productive? I’m really a hard worker and I’m doing non-traditional approaches (because traditional techniques don’t advance/”revolutionize” the field) in my research but I don’t have any output. My advisor agrees that we need to do non-traditional approaches to advance our field, but he is pointing out that we need results and to do some baby steps based on a published research. Unfortunately, It’s too late now to publish anything. I also feel that this RA job is something against me when I want to apply for a phd program (maybe in a much better school). Would a person who read my application make a statement like this; “2 years as an RA with a good advisor and no a single publication? furthermore a bad thesis? your application is in the trash dear..”. I also feel that my advisor feels I’m not really a good RA, and if the time came back, he wouldn’t have hired me. Which means that he won’t give me a good recommendation letter and most importantly, I let him down. He was very generous to me and provided me a full scholarship and this RA job because he thought I’m really good, but now he thinks the opposite. For me personally, I do believe that I’m not productive, however, I’m learning a lot and I’m a hard worker.

What is the effect of such a situation on me when I want to apply for a Ph.D. program in one of the very good schools (one of the top 200 schools in the world maybe?)

Inspired by this question, I have a similar but somehow different problem.

I recently assumed a tenure-track position. One of my strategies for a visible start is to have a strong presence in social media. We have a youtube channel in which students regularly explain their achievements. Or sometimes we post short educational materials. We also prepare brief videos for each publication as some publishers promote the videos.

However, one of my PhD students refuse to cooperate. I specifically asked him in the interview (both video chat and email questionnaire) if he is willing and ready to prepare such video materials for the group, and he firmly answered YES. Now, he claims it is not part of the job description for a PhD.

I first preferred to ignore this conflict, but now other students are reluctant to do so. Now it is more a matter of my authority.

Since I am new, I do not want to take the case to the department head or other officials.

Inspired by this question, I have a similar but somehow different problem.

I recently assumed a tenure-track position. One of my strategies for a visible start is to have a strong presence in social media. We have a youtube channel in which students regularly explain their achievements. Or sometimes we post short educational materials. We also prepare brief videos for each publication as some publishers promote the videos.

However, one of my PhD students refuse to cooperate. I specifically asked him in the interview (both video chat and email questionnaire) if he is willing and ready to prepare such video materials for the group, and he firmly answered YES. Now, he claims it is not part of the job description for a PhD.

I first preferred to ignore this conflict, but now other students are reluctant to do so. Now it is more a matter of my authority.

Since I am new, I do not want to take the case to the department head or other officials.

I’ve been accepted to a relatively prestigious neuroscience PhD program abroad and will be joining a new lab (2.5 y/o) in a few months. I’ve been in contact with a possible PI a few months before applying and was very excited about their previous and current research plans. From talking to their students (at the time, two postdocs, one PhD and one research assistant), I got the impression everything was going very well and everyone was very satisfied (this was about five months ago).

However, in a recent visit, I discovered both postdocs have decided to leave the lab (and also explicitly regret joining it), mostly due to disagreement about the way the research is conducted. I think it might be important to note that we’re all pretty sure that the PI has some form of Asperger’s, which is evident mostly in communication difficulties. While all of their students stressed that they are a very nice, generous person, who is always willing to help with whatever (and also well-funded), they also claim what was once seen as shyness and introvertness (which can be dealt with) is now being seen as mostly lack of understanding, direction, and general vagueness on part of the PI (i.e., not really having a clear direction of where the lab research should go or a good enough understanding of neuroscience).

The last PhD student and I get along very well, and they claim I shouldn’t be too worried and mostly be prepared to work independently; however, I get the feeling they are also quite worried about the situation.

So I guess my question is: have I made a wrong choice? How worried should I be? I’m torn between moving forward with the program, and in the worst case moving labs after a year, and between giving up on this specific lab right now and trying to find other options. As I mentioned before, this is more complicated by the fact I would be moving abroad for this PhD, which includes quite a lot of pre-planning.

Thanks

Some additional information that may or may not be important:

  • I really like the PI, and we seem to get along well (as much as is possible with them).
  • The PI comes from a background in Physics, while their post-docs was in neuroscience. They don’t have many publications, but those that they do have are in really highly-regarded journals. They are also very open to answering questions, but you need to be very direct in your questions.
  • One postdocs has a background in physics, while the other in psychology and neuroscience.