I am finishing up my PhD this year and my adviser has recently recruited two new PhDs to our research group. I am the adviser’s first student. Up until this year, we have had consistent individual research meetings weekly. Now, the adviser wants to incorporate weekly group meetings in addition to individual meetings. I think this can benefit some PhDs. However, I don’t feel that these weekly group meetings will be particularly valuable to me. This is because I have a clear research agenda that is my top priority right now. I am wrapping up two manuscripts to incorporate into my dissertation, while also applying to jobs and post-docs, to finish my PhD in less than a year.

I am not discounting the importance of reading new research articles or the importance of collaboration between group members. However, I think the mismatch in PhD progression — me, a finishing PhD with several first-author manuscripts with multiple collaborators, and the 2 new students, starting to test out and find research ideas — will take away from my priority, finishing the PhD and wrapping up my thesis while also being a potentially stressful, time sink. This is tied into the fact that my adviser often has poor time management skills, allowing meetings to run for over 3 hours.

How do I tell my adviser, in a respectful manner, that I cannot attend all of the group meetings? Or, that I think prioritizing my final two manuscripts and dissertation are a more valuable use of my time?

Thank you for the advice! Let me know if I can clarify anything.

I have read various posts on SO related to my question, so the parts i got answer i am not putting here.

My advisor asks me to write a paper and when i send the draft its with him unless the last week of deadline for journal. Then he call me for meeting and i can clearly see the nice and crispy pages just printed without a single dot, and also he will roughly turn pages and then tell me do this and that. And these changes takes lot of time. Then he will again do the same and propose such changes that needs whole revision and most of the time at end i need to revert the changes. If to be honest, i want to tell him that please at least for one time read the whole paper propose changes and let me do it then, it will save our months of time instead of keeping it with you for more then a month without reading. Same thing happened when i was writing my first annual report which has to be submitted before 9th month of starting phd, i submitted in my 7th month and ended up passing first year in 16th month after starting date.

I cant change advisor due to my study leave rules and my tenure of leave as well as the scholarship he gave i cant even talk to him as he is very reserved, not open for discussions or arguments.

Should i just do as it is or do i need to ask someone from management for help?

I am wondering, because she is the only one in the department who is specialised in the area I worked in. But then also she worked with me, so she will recognise the things I’ve written – apart from that there is probably noone else who tackled exactly my topic.

How is fairness ensured here? It does not seem possible to mark this anonymously really?

What would be a good way to overcome bad experiences with a professor in my department, who is not my main advisor, but from whom I would like to get advice regularly?

During the first year of my PhD, I worked with the Professor in a class on a project that I didn’t perform well on (because I was not very interested in that particular project + I didn’t feel very confident on the topic by that time). Our relationship has cooled down since, and he was even debating whether or not to put me as a co-author on the paper that came out of the project with multiple students. (the authoring-issue is not part of this question; I mention it to describe the status of our relationship)

Now in my second year of my PhD, I realize that it would be quite valuable to have his advice on other projects that I work on, potentially even as a co-advisor, but I fear I messed up the relationship too badly.

What would be a good approach to overcome the bad/non-existing relationship? Or would that be a waste of time and I’d rather look for someone else, which could potentially even mean I need to change the focus of my PhD?

What would be a good way to overcome bad experiences with a professor in my department, who is not my main advisor, but from whom I would like to get advice regularly?

During the first year of my PhD, I worked with the Professor in a class on a project that I didn’t perform well on (because I was not very interested in that particular project + I didn’t feel very confident on the topic by that time). Our relationship has cooled down since, and he was even debating whether or not to put me as a co-author on the paper that came out of the project with multiple students. (the authoring-issue is not part of this question; I mention it to describe the status of our relationship)

Now in my second year of my PhD, I realize that it would be quite valuable to have his advice on other projects that I work on, potentially even as a co-advisor, but I fear I messed up the relationship too badly.

What would be a good approach to overcome the bad/non-existing relationship? Or would that be a waste of time and I’d rather look for someone else, which could potentially even mean I need to change the focus of my PhD?

I have a professor in my university. He has married his PhD supervisor, and students are now making fun out of it as he didn’t work on his PhD. Instead they were in relationship and this and that.

I was wondering how this decision affects his academic life. Do people doubt his degree as being softly defended or can people trust the expert knowledge of such a person?

Especially if a student wants him as a supervisor and when the student knows about this, what can be the effects of such a relationship on the student’s decision?

I am a Ph.D student in Mathematics, and during my undergraduate career, I worked with a professor on a certain topic (topic X, if you will) that strongly interests me. I have now moved to a different institution for my Ph.D studies. This summer I collaborated with him on a paper in topic X, although the collaboration seems to me mostly one sided (as in, I did virtually all the work, and am even unsure as to whether it is ethical for him to be an author of the paper).

I understand why the professor could not prioritize our work because he is really, really busy with other projects in many topics and with his own advisees. Nevertheless, I feel that I am at a point where I could start working independently on questions in topic X that are very interesting to me, and I think his supervision is no longer necessary. Therefore, I’d like to begin working on these questions by myself, or perhaps in collaboration with other people in the area.

I also have a very friendly, advisor-student (though he’s no longer my advisor) relationship with this professor that I would not like to lose. Would it be, in some sense, a betrayal to his interests if I start working independently on questions that he is interested in solving too at some point? He is usually very “territorial” about his research projects, and I’m not sure whether he would feel offended that I want to work on these questions by myself, because I think he expects that it would be a collaboration.

I have been talking to a professor from University X and had agreed I would work in her lab at the start of the semester. She has been amazing and has worked with me through the entire process. I was accepted the other day and she wrote a letter to get me funding from the University, which ended up being approved.

I was going to write up the letters to other professors I had been speaking to this weekend to let them know of my decision and thank them for their time and consideration. I wish I had.

I just received an email from another professor and at University whose program is ranked slightly higher. This professor has a higher H index and their mentor wrote the book in my field, and also has coauthored many papers with the leading researchers in my particular interest. Basically, slowly turning into a dream placement the more I look at it.

I spent hours searching for anything that might rank the university X (the original) over university Y and the more I researched the more I had the feeling I may have just made a mistake. I know I shouldn’t have accepted without hearing back from the other universities, but things were moving fast and I didn’t slow down to take a step back. So, without accepting in writing, just conversations via email and skype, would this be a big foul? It is pretty clearly spelled out for those entering during the fall under the April 15th Agreement, however for the Spring Semester,there doesn’t seem to be any guidance. I understand that there was considerable effort put in by University X and I am not decided either way, I am just wondering if it is worth my time to worry about/approach the situation.