I am a grad student in Computer Science. I collaborated with my external collaborator and produced a conference paper. My advisor’s contributions were mainly minor editing of the draft(after he found out I was submitting a paper two days before the deadline, and insisted to have a look and he gave me some not so useful commnets and corrected a few inaccuracies. From what I’ve been reading here, his contributions do not warrant authorship at all — especially he made no scientific contributions whatsoever. But as someone new to this (also due to a bit of pressure), I “thought” the “editing” warranted authorship, and he became the last author on this paper which is now published.

I do not receive a grant from him, as I carry my own funding. And my research area is not directly related to his current grant. (Although if one makes some far-fetched arguments, they could still be related.)

However, as it turned out, he recently put this paper into his grant report (which I found out accidentally), it gives the impression this paper had been part of that project on which he is the PI, while it was clearly not. And it was not made clear to me at any point that this would be the case.

I thought it is unethical for my advisor to use this paper like this. In retrospect, he clearly had putting this paper on his grant in mind when he found out I was submitting this paper, and I found his way of asking to discuss and to give comments, then asking to be an author deceiving. He told me recently he is going to present this work (also as part of his grant as I found out), and I feel more deceived.

What are your analyses of this incident (especially how would it affect my contributions to the work if it is perceived as being part my advisor’s project, while it is not)? What are your recommendations?

NB: it was primarily a project between the collaborator and me. The collaborator was not interested in collaborating with my advisor.

So I finished my degree recently, plus close to a years worth of research prior and continuing to work through the summer all to go towards a paper I was hoping would be submitted earlier this year. The story, data and conclusions were all neatly wrapped up and the paper was basically there, but the fact I left to start a job meant that the priority level for getting it submitted plummeted.

Flash forward to now, I haven’t had any contact regarding the paper for months and received a message from a current student who just finished saying that they want to now piece their data into my paper to ‘give a more complete picture’. This concerns me regarding authorship, considering I showed the student experimental protocols that I developed during my undergrad and from what I can see hasn’t collected as much data as I have. Personally, I feel it would be unfair to award a joint lead authorship if it ended up flopping that way if the story were to shift in direction. Again, I know very little as I haven’t been communicated with for a while.

Can anybody share some perspectives regarding this? Separating personal frustration about credit sharing aside, is there any downside to my own career regarding sharing lead authorship? This would also be my first paper.

Thanks

So I finished my degree recently, plus close to a years worth of research prior and continuing to work through the summer all to go towards a paper I was hoping would be submitted earlier this year. The story, data and conclusions were all neatly wrapped up and the paper was basically there, but the fact I left to start a job meant that the priority level for getting it submitted plummeted.

Flash forward to now, I haven’t had any contact regarding the paper for months and received a message from a current student who just finished saying that they want to now piece their data into my paper to ‘give a more complete picture’. This concerns me regarding authorship, considering I showed the student experimental protocols that I developed during my undergrad and from what I can see hasn’t collected as much data as I have. Personally, I feel it would be unfair to award a joint lead authorship if it ended up flopping that way if the story were to shift in direction. Again, I know very little as I haven’t been communicated with for a while.

Can anybody share some perspectives regarding this? Separating personal frustration about credit sharing aside, is there any downside to my own career regarding sharing lead authorship? This would also be my first paper.

Thanks

My graduate student utilized some particles produced by a collaborator’s lab in some animal imaging experiments, which were designed and analyzed by my student and me. The protocol for synthesizing the particles has already been published by my collaborator, and a technician in the collaborator’s lab made the particles according to the protocol. I shared some of the resulting in vivo images from this study with my collaborator, but unfortunately, I subsequently discovered that the collaborator used some of these images in a fraudulent manner (grossly misrepresenting them as preliminary data in some grant applications). The collaborator’s institution conducted a formal investigation of this and other incidents and found scientific misconduct had occurred. I would like to publish my graduate student’s image data, in part to make sure that a legitimate representation of the data is in the literature, but mostly because the work was publicly-funded and represents the hard work of many good people. If the misconduct hadn’t occurred, I probably would have considered including the collaborator as a co-author on the publication, by getting them more involved in the manuscript, even though the particle prep was not novel. But now there are many reasons why I do not wish to publish something with this collaborator! Is documented scientific misconduct involving the data from this study a valid reason for not including this collaborator as a coauthor of a paper describing this study? Can I simply acknowledge the technician who provided the particles and reference the prior publication of the protocol?

For context, I’m a software development professional, with 17 years in the trade. I studied towards a bachelor between until 2000, but never submitted my bachelor’s thesis, as I was hired by a company and, … reasons. If you are old enough to remember the rush around the turn of the millennium, you will know.

Anyway, I have now made a bachelor’s thesis and got it approved. To my surprise, I found that the study I made hasn’t been made before, and as a consequence, the results are not trivial, and may have a bearing on a current debate in my field. (In my professional field, that is, not in academia.)

The bachelor’s thesis is my own work, meaning that I formulated the problem, I designed and conducted the experiments, I collected all the data, and I made all of the analysis. My supervisor approved my plan, and proofread the thesis, but did not make any scientific contribution to it.

I’ve rewritten my bachelor’s thesis to an article or a conference submission, taking out the most relevant parts. As I understand it, my supervisor should be considered a co-author here – is that correct?

The thing is, I sent it to my supervisor for comments, and he promised to look at it, but then I haven’t heard from him in several months, and he does not reply to my attempts to contact him.

I realize this site can’t answer questions about how to approach a specific person. What I would like to know is what my options are.

  • Can I remove him as a co-author from the article, even though he supervised the bachelor’s thesis?
  • If not – how much do I have to change to be able to do that? Do I have to make a new study?
  • Can I submit it, with him as co-author, without his expressed approval?
  • Is there anything else I can do to raise the awareness of my study without his prior expressed approval?

As a master student, I spent three semesters working on my thesis project and I expected to graduate by the end this current semester. My supervisor told me that there will be five to six research papers out of my thesis project; he wants me to be first author for two research papers, while he will be first author for the rest (four papers).

I choose to be a full-time student (not employed) and focus on my thesis. I spent more than 500+ hours on lab experiments and I have no issues writing most of the research papers.
Honestly, my supervisor supervised me step by step in his office and was always welcoming, but I did all of the lab work and data analysis, while knowing that my thesis topic was mostly his idea.

This issue made me anxious for the last couple of months as part of me thought that it was not fair. I am not happy with it. When I talked to him about it he strongly refused.

Is it fair and reasonable when for my supervisor to be the first author for most of the research papers out of my own thesis project?
If yes, then I am okay with it and I will be relieved, if not then what should I do about it to insure that it’s fair?

I am doing my masters in civil engineering and this is my 7th semester (3.5 years).

As a master student, I spent three semesters working on my thesis project and I expected to graduate by the end this current semester. My supervisor told me that there will be five to six research papers out of my thesis project; he wants me to be first author for two research papers, while he will be first author for the rest (four papers).

I choose to be a full-time student (not employed) and focus on my thesis. I spent more than 500+ hours on lab experiments and I have no issues writing most of the research papers.
Honestly, my supervisor supervised me step by step in his office and was always welcoming, but I did all of the lab work and data analysis, while knowing that my thesis topic was mostly his idea.

This issue made me anxious for the last couple of months as part of me thought that it was not fair. I am not happy with it. When I talked to him about it he strongly refused.

Is it fair and reasonable when for my supervisor to be the first author for most of the research papers out of my own thesis project?
If yes, then I am okay with it and I will be relieved, if not then what should I do about it to insure that it’s fair?

I am doing my masters in civil engineering and this is my 7th semester (3.5 years).

I’m a computer scientist collaborating with colleagues in our medicine faculty, and I’m writing a first draft of a manuscript we’d like to co-author for publication in a medicine journal (actual journal TDB). Looking briefly at similar papers, I notice that it’s common for authors to have their qualifications (MD, PhD, etc.) listed along with their names. This isn’t a convention common to my own field, and I wondered whether there are standard guidelines for which qualifications to include. I have several, including Masters, and a doctorate (DPhil) equivalent to a PhD, but no medical degree. Which should I use, and is it appropriate to use “PhD” instead of the actual doctorate title to avoid confusion?

I need help. What should I use as author address for my paper when I have already resigned from my job and currently unemployed? Also, my previous supervisor and I did not part in good terms, so I am hesitant to use my previous employer as address.

In addition, I do not know whether to include my previous supervisor as author, or to just acknowledge my previous supervisor would be enough. I did everything in this paper, from designing and planning the experiments, executing the plan, analyzing the data, and writing the manuscript. My previous supervisor did provide helpful ideas. Thank you for your advice.

A few years ago in my university, K. N. Toosi University, I was assigned a supervisor by the university. She suggested that I work on Natural language processing and I did so.

The problem is that I wrote the code and did every scientific part myself. It was half way through the work that I realized that she has very little knowledge about NLP and almost nothing about text summarization. She didn’t provide any facilities or grants of any sort for me. I wrote the paper after graduation and she just proofread the work and she didn’t add anything to the paper. Remember she just gave me some suggestions on changing the order of some parts.

Now the question is, does she deserve to have a name in my paper? Is it ethical to add someone’s name as co-author just because they are your supervisor?

She and I had a falling out a few weeks back. I asked her two months ago to do the revisions by the journal and after all this time, she didn’t do anything (I had personal issues and the journal didn’t have much time to edit the paper). I got mad and told her everything about how she treated me and it is absolutely not ethical for someone to choose a field of work and not have any knowledge so the grad student has to do all of the work. She said and I quote “I don’t need your paper and I will send an email to the journal saying I don’t take responsibility for the paper”. I told her it’s fine by me and I won’t publish the paper there. I emailed the editor and apologized for the problems. She told me it’s fine if I have to submit it later or to another journal.