I understand that in a lot of big-lab fields it is common for the principal investigator to append their name to a paper even if they did not write the paper, design the experiment, or collect data since they spend energy securing funding, and managing the whole lab. What about for small labs?

What are the requirements for a supervisor to be included as an author on a paper, as opposed to just appearing in the acknowledgements? If you are working on your own projects independently of your supervisor, but using funding provided by your supervisor (how does this change when the funding provides resources versus just your salary), are you suppose to add them as authors or just acknowledge the source of funding?

I’ve been working on a machine-learning project for the past several months, and I will publish a paper on it soon. On the other hand, there is a person with whom I have worked on various things since a year ago. However, I haven’t told this particular project to him until it was pretty much completed. Even after I revealed it to him, his net contribution to the project seems to me rather negligible.

For example, he made no contribution in terms of original ideas, designing of the algorithm (as he wasn’t informed of my project until later) or writing the paper, and his only contribution to the codes is just one small function, which is a variant of a function I wrote and he thought was useful for supplementing an evaluation of my algorithm. Though he offered to run my algorithm on his GPU; it seems that he hasn’t tested it yet. So far, all the results were achieved with my GPU. Besides, even if he gets a good result on his GPU with the code exactly same as mine, I’m not sure whether he deserves to be a second author of the paper.

There is one project we worked on before but didn’t result in any paper, to which my algorithm can be applied, so that another paper can be published on. My suggestion is that I will help him to apply my code to this past project, so that he can be a co-author of the past project rather than the current project I’m working on.

Does this sound reasonable? Or am I being too parsimonious? Is there any relevant rule of thumb?

I am a PhD student in molecular biology & bioinformatics in Australia. I have previously presented one of my projects as a poster at a conference. This was sent for review to all co-authors, changes made and presented.

A couple of months down the line, I was asked to present a poster at a local conference. I re-submitted the poster abstract, which was accepted. I did this without consulting my primary supervisor as I thought any dispersal of the work would be welcome. Since then, she has started to dislike the results of that project. When the conference was around the corner, and I told her I was presenting, she accused me of bad scientific conduct for presenting something in her name. I apologized, explained why I had not consulted her and retracted the poster.

She’s not dropping the matter though and seems to be using it as a target for some larger disagreements she has with me. What are the rules for re-presenting work or posters? Are there any guidelines and how serious was this accidental transgression?

I am a PhD student and have previously presented one of my projects as a poster at a conference. This was sent for review to all co-authors, changes made and presented.

A couple of months down the line, I was asked to present a poster at a local conference. I re-submitted the poster abstract, which was accepted. I did this without consulting my primary supervisor as I thought any dispersal of the work would be welcome. Since then, she has started to dislike the results of that project. When the conference was around the corner, and I told her I was presenting, she accused me of bad scientific conduct for presenting something in her name. I apologized, explained why I had not consulted her and retracted the poster.

She’s not dropping the matter though and seems to be using it as a target for some larger disagreements she has with me. What are the rules for re-presenting work or posters? Are there any guidelines and how serious was this accidental transgression?

I’ve submitted a publication to an ACS Journal where I performed all the experiments myself, most of the editorial work, and all the coordination. Other authors agreed to let me be the corresponding author.

ACS spontaneously changed the corresponding author to the last author (which doesn’t even have a position a our institution) and send following e-mail to him:

Thank you for your recent submission. ACS Policy requires that the role of corresponding author be assigned to a senior editor who has the equivalent degree to Ph.D. If John Doe has the necessary requirement, and you agree, we would be happy to update the manuscript records. Thank you for the confirmation.

Beeing in Academia since many years, I am pretty aware of what a corresponding author is as I am aware of the questions Is it okay to list a PhD student as corresponding author? and Should student or supervisor be corresponding author for publications based on student research?, I’m a bit upset and asking myself on what base one can make such discrimination.

Since I couldn’t find this ACS policy on their website: is this a kind of unofficial policy? What is the point of making someone corresponding author who doesn’t have as much insights as I have?

I already have published in the past in ACS journals. My highest concern is that these only write to the corresponding author during the review and editorial process and the other authors are familiar with overfull e-mail boxes and “skipping e-mails”…

A friend of mine submitted a paper to a conference, about a topic he was working on in his company. Recently, he got fired from his company so unfairly due to colleagues jealousy (seriously). He already got approval for publication when he was there, but the submission was made arter the firing. The work was a side project, not exact responsibility for him. And he was the only author from the company.

Is he obliged to add his company name as his affiliation? They are not going to pay for the registration and travel sponsorship. He doesn’t want to mention he even worked there.

Just found one of my very old written manuscript in my backup folder and interested to submit it to some journal.

I had written a Manuscript with 7 co-authors in 2008 just 10 years before. The entire work was dealt with observation datasets until 2008. Although I had conducted all the works independently and wrote the manuscript alone, but my supervisor had given 7 authors’s name due to their little helps like suggestions to improve the manuscript, English check etc. However, I counts their contribution to some extent. But one of the co-author (say X) took 5 years to check the manuscript due to perhaps his busy schedule. So finally the manuscript was submitted to a journal in 2013. The reviewers appreciated the work and strongly recommended to update the results with recent datasets i.e. until 2013. It somehow irritated me because I had left the institute long before and was working in different field. Anyway, I updated the results until 2013 and modified the manuscript accordingly.

But all gone waste again, because the same X-author couldn’t check the manuscript in the given time-line even within 1 year. So the editor rejected the manuscript. Now it is already 5 years, the same X-author could not send back his revision. I have also stopped sending reminders 2 years before (last reminded in April 2016). Probably I need to update the results again i.e. until 2018 now.

But I would like to remove this X-author’s name from my manuscript first and then submit it as quick as possible. Now I am wondering proper sentences to ask the X-author to remove his/her name from our manuscript.

Some time ago I was approached by a fellow researcher that had an idea on an earlier work of mine. We started a collaboration and as a result we submitted a manuscript in a prestigious journal. Recently, I stumbled on a publication of my coauthor in which he had used almost verbatim a large part of our common submission (a page long). These parts include results which were entirely mine. I am really disappointed and I am not sure how to proceed with this.

I received a strong opinion statement in an email from an expert in the field who later ended up making enough suggestions that I’m including him as a co-author. Coming from me, or from the paper’s general authorial voice, the statement would stick out as an unsubstantiated claim, and his papers don’t tend to include opinion statements. This would also be the only place in the paper where I’m quoting an expert. Should I just give it up?

To clarify, I’m not even wanting to include it to bolster the paper’s argument, in fact it works against the paper’s argument. But the fact that an expert has this opinion is a significant piece of information that readers might want to have.