I graduated 8 months ago with 7 SCI article published. Recently, I submitted another article based on my thesis work. My supervisor, who actually has no supervisory role in my thesis except for providing a monthly stipend, wants me to add him as a co-author. He argues that he supported my research, but in fact I paid him back more than he supported me, in the form of my work on various projects (totally different than my thesis topic).

During my PhD he never took an interest in my PhD thesis, rather he always used me for his short term industry projects. In 4.5 years we didn’t have a single discussion/meeting on my PhD thesis.

Is him asking me to add him as an author morally correct?
What if I refuse his request? Can my action be consider an unethical act?

I have attended many presentations where one person is presenting work that was completed by multiple people. In most of these presentations, the presenter listed the names of each coauthor in a different way. For instance, two common styles I have seen are:

presentation slide with presenter’s name first and coauthors listed underneath

presentation slide with presenter’s name listed in bold at the same level as coauthors’ names

Is there a proper (or more polite, or generally accepted) way to list the names of coauthors in a presentation?

I’ve noticed many situations where a researcher will put their spouses as co-authors in a paper. Oftentimes, this can be somewhat justified in cases where their spouse is in the same field (and often in the same institution) and would have plausibly provided a non-negligible intellectual contribution to the paper.

However, where does one draw the line in such a situation? What is stopping them from putting each other in every paper they write, effectively “doubling” their academic output? The situation with spouses is somewhat unique in that the barrier for co-author contribution is far more easily passed, compared to two regular collaborating PIs.

We are preparing a new paper and my supervisor tells me that we have to put the name of a person on our paper because he was involved in getting us the grant. He says it is because of future grants and that we want to show that he was involved in the research — and obviously he was not. I think we are supposed to work with him on the last year of my PhD, but not now. My supervisor already knows that I am against it and tells me that this is an “order” and it is because of some sort of “politics”. I can reject but I am not sure what are the consequences. What a PhD student should do in such a situation?

We are preparing a new paper and my supervisor tells me that we have to put the name of a person on our paper because he was involved in getting us the grant. He says it is because of future grants and that we want to show that he was involved in the research — and obviously he was not. I think we are supposed to work with him on the last year of my PhD, but not now. My supervisor already knows that I am against it and tells me that this is an “order” and it is because of some sort of “politics”. I can reject but I am not sure what are the consequences. What a PhD student is supposed to do in such a situation?

I was a graduate student at a university in the US about two years ago and I was working on a thesis. I was an international student and my advisory committee thought that my writing skills were extremely poor and I was asked to quit the program (though I didn’t agree with their decision). I had done some literature review during the program and I recently decided to submit that as a review paper in a fairly decent journal. I just got the decision from the editor saying that the paper could be accepted with minor revision.

Now, I would like your opinion on whether I should contact my advisory committee to see if they would be willing to be the co-authors on the paper. Since I worked on this manuscript while I was a graduate student at that university and did get some help with the corrections on my writing (especially grammar — I did not use any data from any of my supervisors), do you think I must include them as co-authors on the paper? Do I need to include my previous university as my affiliation? Should I contact them and offer them co-authorship? What do I do if they decline or do not respond?

Since I spent a good amount of time and worked really hard on this manuscript, I would like to get it published. I would really appreciate your opinion on what I should be doing at this point to avoid any infraction of others’ intellectual property.

I am writing a paper in English and have a couple of sources that have no author. In German there would be the abbreviation o.V. standing for ohne Verfasser which translates to no author in those cases.

How is this handled in English papers? Would an appropriate translation be n.a. standing for no author? Is there a way in Latex to automatically put something in place by just providing a bib entry without an author?

Instead of:

@online{cloud-ide04,
    author = {n.a.},
    title = {codeanywhere},
    publisher = {Codeanywhere, Inc.},
    urldate = {2018-03-26},
    url = {https://codeanywhere.com/}
}

Rather do:

@online{cloud-ide04,
    title = {codeanywhere},
    publisher = {Codeanywhere, Inc.},
    urldate = {2018-03-26},
    url = {https://codeanywhere.com/}
}

I am currently a postdoc in computer science. Last year I completed my PhD. I have published one research paper during my PhD with my research supervisor. I am trying to work on that paper. I mean I have got something and I think it is going to be an incremental result of the previous research paper.

Question: Do I need to get permission from my past supervisor to publish a paper that builds on our previous co-authored paper?

I finished my PhD in natural sciences in 2015. At some point during my PhD studies I did some measurements for some other scientists.

Now they are about to submit a paper containing my data, and I am listed as a coauthor.

I barely remember the experiments. I did not read the paper (yet).

Do I have to read that paper? Do I have to read it often enough to fully understand it? Should I disagree being listed as a coauthor?