I want to study for computer science for bachelor’s degree (Informatica . L-31) in Italy. I’m searching for a university that does not require an admission test of physics and math (limited seats) but I have not found one yet .

Do you know any university in Rome, Milan, Florence that accepts students without an admission test ?

Do you know any consulting site that can help me finding the suitable university?

I’m a PhD student and a full-time researcher in my uni. This year I was assigned with supervising of one Bachelor’s thesis. My PhD supervisor invented a topic, which is really interesting, but a really difficult one for this level (combination of quantum chemistry and neural networks).

Student, who assigned for that, has a programming background, so he doesn’t have much experience in mathematics or a theoretical computer science. Nevertheless, I believed he can catch up and I had some literature prepared for him.

At first he didn’t contact me for the first several weeks, which made me pretty nervous and I wrote him a polite reminding e-mail with a consultation suggestion. He came and we agreed on some plan. Several weeks later, on our second consultation he showed just a little real progress, but I still considered it ok, believing, that he’s studying the underlying theory beforehand.

The problem is now, that he didn’t show up since and I had to contact him again, only to find out, that he was too occupied by his job and that he will be writing e-mails with his progress.

So, I’m afraid, based on his behaviour, that he tries to appear independent and to develop the software for the thesis on his own. That could be a real problem as he will progress too slow without any guidance (he has NO previous experience with his topic, except programming skills).

So, my question is – how can I politely persuade him to communicate with me more often? I really want him to successfully finish his thesis, both because of my “score” during PhD and because I would otherwise feel guilty of ruining someone else’s career.

I am from Greece just finished my main studies in Schools and i moved in Basel Switzerland.I already have my exams in Greece and I pass in Informatics Engeeniring.The question is: I find a subject in English Buisness Information Technology in Fachnochschule but they are asking for 12 months working experience.
When am looking for job they asking for degree…am little confused
Some options?

I am now styding for first year bachelor’s degree in Mathematics for IT. In the future I would like to major in the same field and possibly continue trying to get a Ph.D. But I still have options to take a different path.

Even though I have a long journey ahead, I am thinking about trying to write a “scientific bachelor’s thesis” (that’s how we call bachelor’s thesis with scientific results on my university in my language) when the time comes.

Is cryptography a field with interesting and imporant problems to solve? I know about some interesting problems like P=NP and some stuff about (post-)quantum cryptography, but surely that’s not what majority of problems are like.

So, is cryptography a field where it is easy to find meaningful and interesting problems to solve?

(I am not sure if this is the right place to ask this, so please inform me if I should ask somewhere else.)

I hold a degree from a European country, and at that time we didn’t have a system similar to the common “Bachelor + Master”. My degree has been considered as equivalent to a Master by the University of another European country, and in this other University I obtained a Doctorate.

Now, a non-European country has offered me a teaching position, and they want a statement of my undergraduate University, saying that that degree is equivalent to a Master. But this University (where I graduated) tells me that they can’t make a statement of equivalence, they can only certify that I have that degree.
So, who should be the authority that officially takes care of confirming the equivalence?

-addendum-

To complicate things, I graduated before the Bologna Process came into effect.

I hold a degree from an European country, and at that time we didn’t have a system similar to the common “Bacelor + Master”. My degree has been considered as equivalent to a Master by the University of another European country, and in this other University I obtained a Doctorate.

Now, a non-european country has offered me a teaching position, and they want a statement of my undergraduate University, saying that that degree is equivalent to a Master. But this University (where I graduated) tells me that they can’t make a statement of equivalence, they can only certify that I have that degree.
So, who should be the authority that officially takes care of confirming the equivalence?

I’ve currently decided to get a second bachelor’s in Statistics over 1.5 years after finishing my first bachelor’s in math. Both of these degrees are debt free and follow a passion of mine. The next goal is to work in industry for about three years at my parent’s home while taking one class a semester in Computer Science online to save for a master’s in Statistics with Thesis where I hope to take some really advanced courses over two years.

The big idea is that I could grab courses like Categorical Data Analysis, Multivariate Statistics, Nonparametric stats (and maybe substitute mathematical stats 1 and 2 with graduate Measure Theory) etc during my second B.S. and then focus on the really advanced statistics courses and math courses during my masters like advanced graduate topology, experimental design and bayesian analysis

Then I would start a PhD in say Computer Science focused on Machine Learning to develop cutting edge statistical tools based on theoretical principles in Statistics, computational topology, measure theory etc.

Would this be too much education? I want to do more than just take classes on various statistical methods before a PhD.

Edit: I should add that the answer I received from r/datascience was to go straight into a Masters program. But since I can’t afford that yet, I guess the answer in my circumstances is that I can do a second B.S. in Stats or Comp Sci if I’m making good money near my parent’s home?

If I’m already at a decent school but don’t feel like graduating, and a professor at a university agrees to take me as a pure math PhD student, can I join the PhD program or must I get a Bachelor’s. The universities I am interested in are medium-upper level math universities (Northwestern, Berkeley, UCLA, Ohio State, etc)

What differences have supervisors here seen in students for bachelor’s, master’s and PhD? What comparisons can be made with regard to their ability to speak in class, to attend lectures and seminars, their enthusiasm for learning, their respect and willingness to listen to their superiors, their assertiveness etc?

Has anyone had the rare chance to see through the same student for all three stages and what growth – and obstacles to progression – have been observed over time?