I have a keen interest in some interdisciplinary fields such as neurophilosophy, neuroethics, and neuroaesthethics. In the end, I have chosen to study biology, but I am not entirely sure if it is the best possible choice, and maybe philosophy would have been a better choice.

What advice would you give to people in general who desire to be involved in interdisciplinary research? Do multiple bachelor’s or master’s degrees? Maybe even different PhD in the fields of interest?

I have a keen interest in some interdisciplinary fields such as neurophilosophy, neuroethics and neuroaesthethics. In the end I have chosen to study biology, but I am not entirely sure if it is the best possible choice, and maybe philosophy would have been a better choice.

What advice would you give to people in general who desire to be involved in interdisciplinary research? Do multiple bachelors?, multiple masters? Maybe even different phd in the fields of interest?

I am wondering if anyone has experienced conflicting feelings of failure associated with their work? Essentially, I am struggling to continue my students and maintain a proactive attitude while continually facing an ever growing list of tasks.

I find myself struggling to even start the list in the morning, and when I do I either fixate on one particular task or rush it (which I later chastise myself for). Throughout my undergraduate degree I worked hard and made great progress, however upon reflection I find that unless I am sure my work is ‘perfect’ I am very reluctant to submit it, and will later feel guilty about it.

I guess most of these behaviors are associated with the fear of failure and/or self belief, or something such like. But I wonder if anyone else has experienced them in their work and if you have discovered any strategies/advice you think would be beneficial.

I’m looking for good hints for my professional life.

I am a mathematician (32 years old) who worked up to now in academia in Europe.
My short CV: PhD + three and a half years of postdoctoral fellowships.
Domain of expertise: dynamical systems / ergodic theory (no applied math).

It’s been some time that I have been losing progressively motivation for research, I do not manage to obtain a permanent position and I start wondering what I could do elsewhere with my expertise (besides teaching, which is of course a possibility).

However I fear that I’m too “specialized” in my domain and I don’t feel adapted for the industry. I have some programming skills, but not enough in my opinion to work in a big data company.

Do you know some examples of mathematicians who found their way in industry with a 100% academic CV like mine? And where? In which areas? Do companies hire mathematicians with no experience outside academics? Do they invest in people with pure-theoretical background and competences?

I am 19 years old. I was average in high school in Mathematics. I never participated in IMO or related competitions. As a result I didn’t join a prestigious undergraduate school. However during 2nd year in abstract algebra courses I developed an obsession for the subject. My advisor told me to look over some graduate level abstract algebra textbooks which I certainly will.

My school can offer me some grad level courses in my fourth year like Class Field Theory and Modular Forms. Nonetheless, not being able to attend a prestigious undergraduate still haunts me. I know it will certainly affect my graduate school admissions.

In the long term, do late bloomers in Mathematics have a chance to pursue good research careers in Mathematics?

I have been offered a Marie Curie Fellowship as a PhD researcher. That means I would be employed by the business school to carry out 3 years of a PhD project approved by European Commission. I would simultaneously have the status of a PhD student and a business school employee.

However, the business school is perhaps ranked around 9 to 10 in that country. A serious concern is if other (better ranked) schools in that country and in rest of Europe will look down upon my PhD just because it is not from the list of elite schools in Europe. This particular school is not ranked by 2 of the well known rankings, though it punches way higher than its size and overall reputation research-wise in a third ranking, which is often considered the most trusted by students embarking on PhD at a business school.

I know what the project is and who my supervisor will be. He is an active researcher, though I don’t know to what extent he would go on to support me during and after PhD.

The alternative is a regular PhD program, with a full scholarship at a pretty strong brand name within Europe (another country). However, its research ranking is not very good, but the overall impression of that school Europe-wide is impressive. The school overall features in top 30 worldwide in one of the rankings, but for research in my area of studies, it ranks between 100-150 by 2 rankings and about 200-250 by the third. This school is ranked 3rd-4th in its country and is known internationally for its MBAs et cetera, so at least recruiters would know the school. I don’t know what project I would eventually finalize and the supervisor I would get, but as they say, the chances of things going wrong are lower at a good school.

My goal: I am looking at a career in academia afterwards. Some professors I spoke with have hinted that it is often the name of the graduating school that gets you noticed. Could the mention of Marie Curie fellowship compensate for any weaknesses of the specific school I attend? If so, how do I overcome the reputation and get noticed when the recruiters are said to be interested in shortlisting based on the recognition / popularity of schools?

I am a second-year assistant professor who is hoping to make a pre-tenure move to a school/location that is better for my family. It is not a situation where my current department is bad or toxic, but I think my partner (job) and kids (schools, time with relatives) would be happier elsewhere.

I read a lot of advice which suggests that it is best to make a move before tenure rather than after. However, no one seems to specify when pre-tenure one should be looking. I am inclined to begin looking even before my mid-tenure review because the departments I would be looking in are typically small and I can’t rely on the fact that they would have an opening in any particular year.

Is there a “normal,” “accepted,” or “typical” time to be make a pre-tenure move?

Here are some related questions:

What is a better point in an academic career to move to the U.S.: as an assistant professor or after tenure?

Job search when coming up for tenure