Today I saw a photograph of an upcoming exam at my university. At first I thought it was last year’s exam; so I took a closer look at it as I think it is okay to see last year’s exams even if they aren’t officially published.
Anyway, later someone revealed to me that it was the upcoming exam which we’ll take in about three weeks.
It was taken by another student in my course, who took it while the teacher was on a break outside the room.

I feel bad and unethical about seeing it, as it seems to be cheating for me, and even more I’m worried about my further career if this ever comes out.
On one hand I don’t want to harm the other student who took the photo, on the other hand I don’t want to risk my career.

It is a semi difficult exam; I would say you should pass it quite well if you learned for it.
So what should I do? If I tell the university I’d probably have to reveal the identity of the person who took it, which I don’t want to do under any circumstances.

First things first. I am not a good person – I have never pretended to be. But I tried to make my parents (more importantly my dad) proud. Today I screwed up. I sat for an exam that I don’t understand the work for, despite trying my best. I got desperate (this module is a prerequisite for everything next year), and I cheated. I had all the tutorials on my phone (I study using my phone, not my laptop, I didn’t plan to cheat) and I tried to scrape together some answers. I was caught. Whatever happens I will not make credits this year (if I’m not expelled – which I deserve). I am so disgusted with myself. I have already taken full responsibility for my actions. No point in lying. I have struggled with engineering ever since I started (I’ve already taken 3 years to do 2 years worth of work). My question is, how do I handle myself going forward? What is the point of trying anymore?

Imagine this scenario: you’re in an exam. Somebody asks for your help to answer a question. You help them (whisper the answer, slip them a note, whatever). You get caught. You get punished.

That’s fine. You’re not allowed to help others cheat. You broke the rules. The university is liable to punish you. All of this makes perfect sense so far.

But.

In my experience, it is often the case that this student who, remember, did not cheat on their own exam, often receives a punishment directly related to that exam, i.e. they fail the exam.

This does not seem to make any sense at all. The wrongdoing of the student has nothing to do with their performance on the exam. They did not cheat. Therefore, their exam is a separate thing entirely, and punishing them by failing them seems like an arbitrary thing to do.

Let me give you an example. Say a student punches a teacher. Would this student ever receive a punishment like “oh now you have failed your exam in Abstract Algebra!”?

No. The punishent will be general (suspension, etc), but the exams are not touched.

So, in the above example, why is the student who helped others cheat being punished on their exam, when their exam performance involved no cheating at all? What is the justification for this?

Imagine this scenario: you’re in an exam. Somebody asks for your help to answer a question. You help them (whisper the answer, slip them a note, whatever). You get caught. You get punished.

That’s fine. You’re not allowed to help others cheat. You broke the rules. The university is liable to punish you. All of this makes perfect sense so far.

But.

In my experience, it is often the case that this student who, remember, did not cheat on their own exam, often receives a punishment directly related to that exam, i.e. they fail the exam.

This does not seem to make any sense at all. The wrongdoing of the student has nothing to do with their performance on the exam. They did not cheat. Therefore, their exam is a separate thing entirely, and punishing them by failing them seems like an arbitrary thing to do.

Let me give you an example. Say a student punches a teacher. Would this student ever receive a punishment like “oh now you have failed your exam in Abstract Algebra!”?

No. The punishent will be general (suspension, etc), but the exams are not touched.

So, in the above example, why is the student who helped others cheat being punished on their exam, when their exam performance involved no cheating at all? What is the justification for this?

In my freshman year of undergrad I was a chemistry major. However, I hated it and because I hated it I did not do well in my chemistry classes. Because of this, I cheated on a midterm as well as a problem set by over collaborating with another person. I got caught and was called in – but long story short, I ended up confessing and was put on leave for a term. During this term I spent a lot of time thinking about what I did, volunteered at a summer camp, and spent my time productively. I truly regret what I did but I cannot change the past. When I came back, I switched my major to math because I hated chemistry and I wanted to pursue my true passion. However, I now soon will apply to graduate school for math. I am planning on disclosing the academic dishonesty I committed during my freshman year. Nonetheless, I am worried that my application will be dismissed entirely because of my cheating incident. Obviously cheating is a big red flag in any student’s application. But will I even have a chance at being accepted at say a mid tier math graduate school? Will it help if I manage to get the undergraduate dean whom I confessed to, to write a letter on my behalf?

I took a test today morning and I saw that the person sitting next to me used her phone repeatedly, I believe it was to check the power point slides for answers. The fact that this student also asked me for the answer to a question before I left also raises my suspicious slightly.

I don’t know this person. I decided not to report it this morning because I don’t feel quite alright accusing anyone, at least not in person. I am tempted to send an anonymous email and explain what happened, although I don’t think it will make any difference. I’m not happy at all with the incident, because the test wasn’t exactly trivial and some of us might fail, while other people could pass simply copying the answers from their phone.

What should I do?

Although my question can’t be answered absolutely, I’ll try to state it in a way that’s as close as possible.

I’m considering earning an entirely online SE bachelors degree from a school which also has an on-campus equivalent. But, most importantly: my exams will be all closed book.

It’s very easy to cheat with closed book tests, I expect; even if they try to prevent it, just use a second PC or a virtual machine.

Because of how easy it is to cheat with this method of testing, is it a strong indicator that potential employers will place little value on my degree?

Disclaimer: Quite a lengthy, subjective question by a non-academic but I didn’t know what other website where I can receive legitimate responses, sorry to clog your feed.

I am currently a second-year undergrad student doing an English degree. Recently I had 2 assignments where I plagiarised in a lapse of judgement. For assignment 1 (essay) I self-plagiarised a bit and am going through motions with my university to have a meeting to solve this and it seems like a minor thing as it is my own work and my first offence.

However, assignment 2 (creative writing, worth 25% of the course) I plagiarised a creative that belonged to a high school student I tutored last year. I submitted through Turnitin and was NOT caught and have already received my marks and feedback. The ex-student I copied is doing a music degree (so quite unrelated to me/no subject crossover) at my university so I am scared he will somehow submit his work and it will come up as plagiarised off me or some other scenario and I will be caught.

I feel so incredibly guilty and ashamed and scared of the consequences of what could happen if I do admit my fault especially since it would be my second offence.
Some questions I have are:

1) Since I got away with it, will my university or Turnitin somehow recheck its database and find out? Is the first time your work is submitted the only time it is checked? If I got away with it that’s the end of it? (Assuming the original work is never submitted through Turnitin and triggers an investigation, etc.).

2) What do you think will happen if I do nothing? Do you think I will get caught or not? (Not karma stuff but realistically).

3) What would you do in my situation?

Sorry for the amount of questions, any answers are greatly appreciated.

Some universities have a rule that, for example, “if it appears that a student in your class may be guilty of academic misconduct, you must promptly ask the student to meet with you informally to discuss your concerns.” The quote is taken from one such university, the University of Wisconsin. UW’s Academic Misconduct Guide for Instructors goes on to say: “You can discuss the matter with the student in person, by telephone, or online. During this meeting, you should explain why you believe the student may have committed academic misconduct and give the student an opportunity to respond. It is not necessary to inform the student in writing before this meeting.”

What is the rationale behind this type of requirement?

Bonus: How common is this? When did universities in the US start instituting this type of requirement?

So I lecture at a university on the department of mathematics and statistics, and this year I am teaching calculus for future mathematicians. One good thing about the mathematics course is that very seldom I have seen students cheating, since people who choose the academic path are more bound to be interested in learning the subject rather than just trying to obtain a diploma.

Well… At least until now.

There is this small group of students who sometimes whisper during the tests. The other times their class had tests I thought they were asking for an eraser or something like that. But this time they were whispering more than usual and they started stopping after I glared at them. I thought it was suspicious so I waited until the end of the test and went to check their sheets and ditto. They all wrote the exact same thing. (For those familiar with maths they didn’t copy a thing or two, but two actual entire theorem proofs.)

Now next time we have tests I could try separating those guys, asking them to sit on other chairs, staying behind the class in order to make it difficult for the students to cheat and stuff like that, but in all seriousness… Those measures make it look like I’m dealing with kids. I’m not a teacher. I’m a professor. I shouldn’t be dealing with kids.

Basically I want to do something about this but I don’t want to start making the class look like a high school. Those guys are future math teachers/professors and I’ll be damned if I have to organize the class preventing future professors from cheating like this was a normal occurrence.

So what should a professor do in this situation? Are there any things you fellow professors have done and worked? Thanks in advance.