I wonder if anyone can help with the following question.

I’m doing research after a different professional experience, so I’m presently in an early stage of my new career – although I’m in my middle age. I would like to establish some sort of connection – possibly collaboration – with a researcher I admire, but who doesn’t know me.

How should I address this person in the best way in order to hopefully obtain a positive response? Unfortunately, there are no chances for me to get to know her directly through some kind of congress or conference for the moment.
I hope I shouldn’t simply give up the idea…

Any suggestion is welcome!

I am a 3rd-timer postdoc, and I often run into this issue. Over my career I have greatly benefitted personally of responsible peer review and participating in the elaboration of ‘Response to Reviews’. Moreover I am very wary of publishing ethics, and open discussion of papers after publication.

This is often what happens: the 1st author of a paper where I am a co-author assigns a PI as last corresponding author. This PI is usually older and actually less invested in the project, but wishes to handle the submission. This person will however not share any correspondence with editors or submission files with authors other than the first (and I suspect even then not in full). I am thus left in the dark about discussions over papers where quite often I made a major part of the writing and experiments, and the only specialist about core topics being discussed.

I have tried asking for the details of peer review and was ignored, every time this happened. On a most recent case I received editorial notification of submission of same paper from two different journals within the time span of just 5 days, and now I fear somebody pulled a duplicate submission! This kind of attitude has made me reluctant of handing the position as corresponding authors to others, particularly to PIs, which is politically not good.

Is this widespread? I am too intolerant, or just particularly unlucky with my collaborations?

I’m a student and I’ve been visiting a collaborator of my advisor to work on a project. The visiting period ends in a few days and it has been productive and enjoyable. We have worked well together, but the professor has no shortage of students or collaborators.

What is a more “refined and professional” way (for lack of a better term) to phrase the following message:

Keep me in the loop in case you have some other projects I may be able to contribute to.

Few months ago I contacted with a person who conducted a research in a topic that could easily be combined with my own work.

For this reason, I sent him an e-mail exposing my research and why it could be interesting to develop a common work, taking into account his results.

He answered me and showing interest in the work (that is what read between lines). Furthermore, he recommended me some literature.

When I read about half of the documentation, I sent him a mail with the insights I got and several self-publications, justifying my points.

He answered me again, discussing some points and glad to have my work pending to read.

I finished his readings and I sent back my impressions. He continued the discussion and excuse himself because of not having read my papers.

After two months, I have no reply from him. What should be my next step towards the collaboration?

I developed a survey and my study using the survey is still under review for a publication. However, my friend wants to use the survey and data for her study. I collected the data only in my school; she wants to collect additional data from a different school.

My concerns are:

  • If her study is published before mine, my study could be meaningless.
  • Also, the two studies could be very similar.

Is it okay to allow her to use my survey as well as my data?

I’m a student and I’ve been visiting a collaborator of my advisor to work on a project. The visiting period ends in a few days and it has been productive and enjoyable. We have been well together, but the professor has no shortage of students or collaborators.

What is a more “refined and professional” way (for lack of a better term) to phrase the following message:

Keep me in the loop in case you have some other projects I may be able to contribute to.

I have received my MSc degree and I want to apply for Ph.D. programs.

I have an idea for an invention (this idea came from my master’s thesis), but it is not completely related to my field – I will need help from people of other fields to design this application.
The idea is new and it is not registered yet.

Since I am graduated, I don’t have any access to the university.
How should I approach a professor to team with me for this work? Is it possible?
If yes could you please give me a piece of advice or sample emails?

BWY, I’d like to study in a foreign country as well, e.g., in the USA.

I’ve talked a surprising number of graduate students in several disciplines, all in the same bind:

  • They have a very senior and well respected academic as a coauthor
  • That coauthor has been sitting on the manuscript for a year or more
  • They have written several followups with no luck.
  • They can’t (or feel they can’t) pull that person from the paper,
    partly for desire to benefit from the glow of fame, but largely for fear of offending this kind of person, who so often functions as a gatekeeper to their discipline.

I don’t know what to tell them, besides keep following up, or give up on getting the paper published. Any better advice?

Last year, a researcher produced a nice dataset that happens to be uniquely well-suited for use in a study I plan to carry out. At this time, I am in the process of applying for funds. Does it make sense to contact him asking if he would be interested in a future collaboration which, provided the project is funded, would commence in 2019? The advantage of doing this now would be to mention the potential collaboration in my proposal. Note that the data is open access, so I could just use it without contacting him. Nor is he anyone famous, but I feel that a connection would make my project appear more concrete and realizable. I wonder how all this might be perceived by him however, what would you expect?

Earlier in my undergrad I co-authored a paper with one of my professors. Initially it was supposed to be just a class project, but on his suggestion I did some more work and went with it at a student conference and then with substantial help from his part we managed to further expand the topic and write an article which has been published on a (small) national journal.

A few months ago I took part in a problem solving contest for undergrads. Among the problems there was one which was quite interesting, basically made out of two parts. I got the highest score on the problem, but barely did any work on the second part. I tried looking in the literature and while there are many references about the general concept, nothing about the specific version presented on the contest (I should point out that there is nothing trivial about it, i.e. the solution and the implications are different from anything I found so far). This seems like a nice opportunity for a paper, and I think I could actually get it solved with some additional help. I was thinking about proposing this to the professor that was my co-author on my first paper, but I’m not really sure how to approach him, as the synopsis for the first one was totally different from this case. To make matters more complicated, we got some money out of the first paper (not much and it was his initiative to apply for the prize), and I also received a scientific performance scholarship for it, and I don’t want him to feel/think that I’m trying to do research for the sake of money.

So, how should I formulate my e-mail in order to make him understand that I see an opportunity for an article but without seeming like I’m desperate?