I remember reading in The Professor Is In that the tenure-track references should be from external members, not only your past advisors/supervisors.

That book is written aimed at social sciences, maybe, so, for Computer Science, in Canada (and the US), how important is it really?

I imagine that it would not be a dealbreaker for a rockstar, and that exactly how much impact would depend on the case/institution/competition, but what can I expect the impact to be?

I am wondering if there is anything I can do (besides going back in time) to be accepted into the likes of Berkeley, Carnegie Mellon, MIT, or the University of Toronto.

I double majored in Mathematics and Computer Science at a top 5 computer science program in the United States, but my GPA is a 3.05. I received Cs in several introductory classes like “Global Cinema” and “Introduction to Object Oriented Programming”, but received A’s in advanced classes like “Advanced Algorithms”, “Computer Simulation”, and so on. I received B’s in the majority of my upper-level mathematics courses. I also have a publication in machine learning, of which I am not a first author. I did not interact with any professors in a meaningful enough manner to gain a strong recommendation, but I did do extensive research with a PhD student who is now a professor.

I’m working on the implementation of an original idea that integrates some findings in pure math with deep learning, which I hope to submit to NIPS. If the paper was accepted and I was the sole author, would this be sufficient to gain admission? I plan to continue my work regardless of whether I am accepted to a program or not (it is my passion), but I am hoping to read of a path that I can get on which will give me a fighting chance, so I can be more productive throughout my lifetime. I wish to begin study in the field of regular/quantum reinforcement learning.

The only idea I’ve come up with is to move to a foreign country where the cost of living is much lower, work a job that requires very little time and effort (i.e teach English), and place the rest of my time & energy into my research. I did not prioritize grades in my undergraduate degree, but I am capable of learning concepts and applying them in novel ways.

I know it’s a long shot, but I am willing to take whatever risk and put in as much work as my body will allow.

I know many of you already post similar questions about quitting before, and I have read many of them. But I actually don’t wanna quit…

And I need some advice how to write a formal drop-off email to the department and my advisor in my situation

Here is My current situation

I have talked to my current advisor, told him I can’t do research in such stress and painful life, he approved. However, the department really unhappy about it.(I have my Ph.D. funding for being TA for the department)

I’ve asked informally and got an answer “They will tell you No, unless, you and your advisor can provide a very good reason. Because you are not the only one quitting your lab”.

From inside, I don’t want to quit. I have passed the qualifying exam with a top grade and have been here for 3 years. But I have made no progress since the beginning of the year. I couldn’t finish my coursework because of a “one-class-one-semester” rule. I finished nothing according to my CV, and I felt all my peer is laughing at me. I’m very stressed, every day, I sat in front of the computer doing nothing.

I don’t think I can switch advisor, because my current advisor will over-thinking things and will end up very bad from my expectation. And I don’t think I am qualified for anything or anyone would accept me.

Here is what lead to my current situation:

I was a bad student:

I am computer science major, I have a GPA of 3.5/4. I have no gift in math and programming was my only strength. I have zero backgrounds in research, so I can’t make a research paper or find a suitable conference myself. I joined the current program only because of a referring letter from my current advisor.

And I got upset easily if I did badly in my class.

My relationship with my advisor:

He a very nice man, but I can’t say he is good at helping me. So the lab has no focus, he allowed everyone attacks any possible directions. He got his Ph.D. in EE but works as a CS advisor in my department

He thought I am smart, but he hates people doing programming because he thinks do programming is kind of wasting time. Our focus should be on math. He doesn’t like me to do any programming before he approved, because he thinks “thinking as a programmer” is toxic to my research. There are several times that he laugh at me in public saying it is bad I can only do programming.

And he cares a lot about our personal lives. And earlier time, when I still trust him, I told him some of my non-academic concern.(It ends badly….)

Currently, I am just about to finish my sophomore year in an undergraduate school studying computer science. I am worried about my current school impacting whether or not I will get in to a prestigious graduate school.

Without giving away too many details, my school is fairly well known and has an undergraduate class size of around 30,000. Also, the school is ranked around the 80s of schools in the US.

My growing ambition and love for computer science has grown greatly during my time here and I would to continue my education at a prestigious graduate school.

As of now, I have a 4.0 GPA and I have been and will be involved with internships during my summers. If I continue my current path, what are my chances at getting into a top 10 american graduate school?

I am a computer-science PhD student. I like to work on things and I enjoy doing computer science. But here is a problem: I am not that much into debates. When I meet with my supervisor, he asks me some questions and I try to answer those. I don’t go into debates on the research questions. I like to do research independently, also in a collaboration, but only to a small extent. Many of my friends ask me to enter into debates, but I don’t like it much. I like mostly objective sorts of questions. I like subjective questions also, but to a small extent.

Question: Is it possible for non-debating person to survive in research?

My professor let us study our marked midterm papers. I photographed my paper, so that I could discover my mistakes and learn from them. My professor freaked out when I photographed my marked paper.

What’s wrong with photographing a marked midterm paper?

My professor didn’t forbid photographs in advance and other professors don’t mind photographs being taken, some even provide model answers.

I am a computer-science PhD student. I like to work on things and I enjoy doing computer science. But here is a problem: I am not that much into debates. When I meet with my supervisor, he asks me some questions and I try to answer those. I don’t go into debates on the research questions. I like to do research independently, also in a collaboration but only to a small extent. Many of my friends ask me to enter into debates but I don’t like it much. I like mostly objective sorts of questions. I like subjective questions also but to a small extent.

Question: Is it possible for non-debating person to survive in a research?

My professor let us study our marked midterm papers. I photographed my paper, so that I could discover my mistakes and learn from them. My professor freaked out when I photographed my marked paper.

What’s wrong with photographing a marked midterm paper?

My professor didn’t forbid photographs in advance and other professors don’t mind photographs being taken, some even provide model answers.

Suppose, a university is committed to provide a PhD studentship (i.e tuition waiver, and monthly stipend) for 5 years to a student once he is admitted.

What happens to that advantage when the student can’t complete the PhD in those designated 5 years?

  • Is he expelled from the program, or is he expelled from the monetary aid?

  • What can he do next to complete the degree?