I’m about to start interviewing for tenure-track computer science positions in the US. I’ve read various bits of advice online [1,2,3] about meeting with graduate students in the department I am visiting.

I can see the value in getting the student perspective on the department. (Although it’s also a bit scary. I’m not much older than the students and sometimes the students can be overzealous and ask tougher questions than the faculty.)

I’m told that most places will organize such a meeting automatically. However, should I ask for a student meeting anyway when setting up the job interview?

I worry that, if this is not standard, then it might be an awkward request for them. One school of thought is that this is a bad sign I should be aware of, but I don’t think I should read too much into it.

I’m a computer science student at Stony Brook University. As the undergrad final project next semester, I am to do a research project under the supervision of a professor, whom I have to find this semester.

I have not yet taken any classes with professors whose research I am interested in, How can I show that I’m “competent enough” for them to spend time on me? It feels like standards for computer science are different than say, biology. I also currently don’t know a lot about the area I’m interested in (data systems/mining), though I will be taking the database course this semester. Would this be a major negative factor?

Specializing the question
Who to address on the cover letter?,
let’s assume that you apply for a tenure-track position in the US in computer science, that the job announcement has no particular individual listed, and that Google/Bing/Yahoo led you to, say, “recruiting committee” (as opposed to “search team”). Then, which opening would be proper:

To Whom It May Concern

or

Dear Recruiting Committee

or

Dear Representative of the Recruiting Committee

or

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen

?

How about the punctuation after the opening? No punctuation, a comma, or a colon? I.e.:

〈Whatever opening〉

〈Whatever opening〉,

〈Whatever opening〉:

All are o.k. according to the broad English grammar, but, in academia things might be more special.

Specializing the question
Who to address on the cover letter?,
let’s assume that you apply for a tenure-track position in the US in computer science, that the job announcement has no particular individual listed, and that Google/Bing/Yahoo led you to, say, “recruiting committee” (as opposed to “search team”). Then, which opening would be proper:

To Whom It May Concern

or

Dear Recruiting Committee

or

Dear Representative of the Recruiting Committee

or

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen

?

How about the punctuation after the opening? No punctuation, a comma, or a colon? I.e.:

〈Whatever opening〉

〈Whatever opening〉,

〈Whatever opening〉:

All are o.k. according to the broad English grammar, but, in academia things might be more special.

Recently I’ve implemented a pipeline given from a paper, there are three main steps two of these are offline and the third one is real time. The real time part was particularly difficult to implement, and mainly because of lack of details. More specifically the problem was the authors provided a function and they said “we minimize this function”. The problem with that is that is wasn’t explained how they actually solved the problem and I had in the first place work out all the mathematical details by myself. I’ve done a detailed analysis that wasn’t provided by the original paper, like predicting solution in some cases, computational complexity. Given that this algorithm was real time then this analysis can be useful for whoever would like to implement it.

The question is, given a paper that tells you “we solved our problem using this and we have obtained these numbers” can be worth publishing all the analysis that can theoretically justify those numbers?

In my mind this could also be useful for validation purpose of whoever wants to implement it.

Also, it would be nice to have some example of this if it happens.

I am graduate student from India who is planning apply for masters in machine learning the next Fall(2018).

My background is as follows:

1)Graduated from India from IIT Mandi(ranked 13th in India) with 8/10

2)Internship in Microsoft India and worked for 1 year as Software Developer after my graduation there.(Got a pre placement offer from Microsoft).

3)One Major Technical project under a Professor in my college in the field Coding theory.

4)I quit my job and presently working as research staff in IIT Bombay(ranked 1 in India) in the field of deep learning.I will be working for 1 year here can get a paper published easily as second author and also contribute to other research.

5)I’m also doing a probablistic graphical model course(with certification) of Daphne Koller

I have not done much coursework in the field of machine learning.I have one year in my hand(Jan,2018 to November,2018).

I need advice as to how can I plan this time effectively(doing online courses,kaggle..etc) which can show my expertise in the field so that I can get into top 10 grad colleges.
Thanks a lot for your time.

I’m currently studying Computer Science at an Australian university.

About 4-5 months ago, I submitted what the university calls a “Credit for Prior Learning Application” which is a form that allows one to claim specified or unspecified credits based on one’s own prior studies (self or formal) or professional or volunteer experience. (Specified credit basically equals not having to take that subject.)

Each subject at the university has specific learning outcomes that must be demonstrated in order to receive credits for the class.
I applied for 4 subjects and spent a lot of time filling out the forms and addressing each individual learning outcome by providing (numerous) specific examples in great detail from my previous workplaces along with software I developed. I also submitted a lot of evidence to support my claims such as my previous employers’ phone numbers, links to the software I developed, etc.

About a month ago I decided to meet with the Head of Faculty to discuss my application since I hadn’t heard anything about my application after all this time. He said the university didn’t like that I applied for four subjects for specified credits. He said they might get me to take a supervised exam to demonstrate my knowledge in the subjects but nothing had been decided yet.

Earlier today, the university came back to me and said they had decided to implement a new rule stating that undergrad students of Computer Science would not be able to claim specified credit for prior learning. Needless to say, I am a bit upset about it and feel my application should be considered as normal since I submitted it prior to any such rule existing. I am an international student and pay a lot of money per subject as well so I feel this might have had something to do with it.

What can I do to get the university to recognize my past professional experience and self-study?