I’m a postdoc in the sciences.

My supervisor submitted a grant renewal to the NIH recently and listed me as “key personnel” on it. The renewal received very high marks and is likely to be approved.

Although I have received fellowships in the past, I’ve never applied for a grant, and I’ve never been key personnel on a grant before.

Would it be appropriate for me to list on my CV that I’m key personnel on this grant (if the renewal is officially approved)? If so, how should this be stated? Examples from actual CVs would be much appreciated. (To be specific, I’m not sure whether I should list this alongside my fellowships, in my “Awards” section . . . or start an entirely new section for “Grants” or something like that.)

EDIT: This question is similar in flavor to this one, but I’m looking for a more specific answer than that question received . . . It’s possible this should be marked as duplicate.

I had been invited to give a talk at a summer school abroad, but had to cancel due to a complex visa issue that could not be foreseen at the time I accepted to give the talk: it turns out that I’ll be transitioning between two visas because of a job change, and will be unable to leave the country at that time. I had already spend time preparing and had bought airplane and train tickets. I’ve explored possible solutions to be able to attend in person, none of which panned out; I’ve offered the summer school to give the talk remotely, but this wasn’t an option; I have since been working with the summer school to find a replacement and have offered to help them if needed. At this point I’ve invested a fair amount of effort, energy, and money into this invited talk that is not even going to happen. As a not particularly fancy postdoc, I only get very few invited talks. I was also looking forward to this particular summer school (which doesn’t help with me having trouble letting go of this CV entry).

Is it OK to list this talk on my CV under the invited talk section, with some unambiguous qualifier e.g. “withdrawn for visa reasons”, or perhaps something similar? Or would it do more harm than good?

Related question: Invited to give a talk but could not attend, can it be on CV? –> it seems the answer might depend on the specific reason for not being able to attend

Is the creation of youtube content/lectures in your field worth showing off on an Academic CV?

In the most extreme case: if someone who is considering hiring for a teaching position in a university/college is looking at two candidates who are identical in qualifications except for one candidate having a youtube channel which teaches topics in his/her field (with somewhat decent content) would that candidate be considered more “qualified” (in the broadest sense of the word).

I’m still early in my scientific career, with only 2 papers published. However, I’ve discovered a typo in a non-critical equation of my paper, and one of the graphs in the same paper should have smaller values (but exactly the same trend). It’s important to say that it does not change any of the conclusions drawn in the paper. I’ve requested to issue a erratum to fix these errors.

At the moment, I am feeling extremely stressed and saddened thinking about how bad this erratum would reflect on my CV and in my integrity as a researcher… I would like to hear some opinions of people who have been through this process… Did you notice editors becoming more harsh on accepting other works from you because of a past mistake? Was it possible to still get grants and partnerships in projects even if you have a ‘flawed’ record?

I’m still early in my scientific career, with only 2 papers published. However, I’ve discovered a typo in a non-critical equation of my paper, and one of the graphs in the same paper should have smaller values (but exactly the same trend). It’s important to say that it does not change any of the conclusions drawn in the paper. I’ve requested to issue a erratum to fix these errors.

At the moment, I am feeling extremely stressed and saddened thinking about how bad this erratum would reflect on my CV and in my integrity as a researcher… I would like to hear some opinions of people who have been through this process… Did you notice editors becoming more harsh on accepting other works from you because of a past mistake? Was it possible to still get grants and partnerships in projects even if you have a ‘flawed’ record?

This year I have been pursuing my second Master’s degree in pure mathematics. It is a one-year program in which the final score is determined 100% by the final exams. I have excellent scores at my previous degrees, but this year I faced a health issue which resulted in me making very little progress, to the point that I’m pretty certain I will fail my upcoming exams. Assuming that I will be able to overcome my health issue and apply for a PhD* in the future:

  • Would it look better in a PhD application if I pulled out of my upcoming exams completely or if I took them and failed them?

  • What would I write in my CV in each case?

The second scenario sounds a bit worse to me because there will be a transcript with extremely poor grades which I will have to attach to any future PhD application. But maybe I’m missing something. Any advice is welcome.

*: I haven’t decided whether I will be pursuing a PhD or not, so I’m posting the analogous question at workplace.SE as well. I don’t think this is cross-posting since the option that is best for pursuing a PhD might not be best for job hunting (for example I’m not sure whether you are supposed to attach your academic transcripts in a job application).

What is a neat way to include “ongoing research projects” in a mathematician’s academic CV?

By this, I mean something that is narrower than a generic “research interest”, but not quite as defined as a “paper in preparation”.

One colleague of mine uses the following notation:

Cubic Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation

main objectives: study of such and such properties;

in collaboration with Dr. X and Dr. Y