In the classroom, one of the students asked me about Sci-Hub. I answered that I like the idea as I am against the tyranny of publishers. As a fun fact, I added that I have even donated to Sci-Hub.

Then, I received a notice from our department head referring the case to the disciplinary committee since Sci-Hub is illegal and any direct and indirect support of an illegal activity is against the university policy.

I am not prepared to give details in a public forum – I think I need to ask academia.se’s research higher studies community help, in particular senior faculty members, if any.

I would like to explore returning to the pursuit of a terminal degree sometime 2020++ in a field related to my accumulated research work and career credentials with publications and products. I have a major blemish in my overall academic record at my last institution based upon an off-campus incident several years ago which ended in a sentence. At the time of my projected return as a doctoral candidate, the faculty committee recommended suspension, and the admin decided on termination after it became clear I had failed to report it per student policy. Elsewhere on Stack Exch. I have already described the good that came out of that research, and that chapter of my life is now finished.

Can I ask the community if there is any practical chance of pursuing a doctoral program again? If so, When could I approach that, and how could I broach the subject to a new institution?

Thank you.

I just received a confirmation from my graduate program adviser that I successfully completed my two-year-long master’s program. I had a negative experience in my second year because of a mandatory group project that I had to do in order to graduate.This group project was done under a certain level of guidance by a professor. The first semester of this group project was only one credit, while the second semester of this course was three credits. Much of the drama occurred in the last two days before the due date of the group’s final paper, which was via email. I did not get along with two out of four former group members because those two bullied me and badmouthed me behind my back. It was evident to me that their actions were coordinated. Out of these two perpetrators, one was a female who was around my age (mid-20s), while the other one, the male, was 33 years old. I will only talk about the male here.

There were three different paper drafts that we had to submit in the second semester of this group project class. Both of these individuals referred to were procrastinators and felt like the rules of the group did not apply to them. However, they were the most domineering ones in the group and consistently used foul language in group settings. The 33-year-old male was the group editor, but he was an extreme procrastinator who would literally wait until the last moment to do things. He did not do much editing in the first two drafts, and right on the day before the due date of the third and final paper, he suggested to the group to make huge changes. He hardly communicated with me, so I wasn’t even expecting any form of communication from him. Besides, I had another paper that was due at exactly the same day and time as this group project paper. By the time that he started communicating via email to the entire group to make significant changes, I was already much more focused on my other paper and I looked at his email much later. He had sent me an angry message asking if I “still wanted to be a part” of the project. Excuse me, I was involved in this project, but he chose to be actively involved at the very end. I replied to his email, politely asking why he could not make his suggestions much sooner, despite his angry tone in the email that he personally sent to me. What he did in his response was that he broke down every single sentence that I wrote, and commented on how I was ‘wrong’ or did “not know what I was talking about.” In the process, he even dropped the F-bomb twice at me and called me “passive-aggressive” for “challenging him.” He was clearly the aggressive one.
He attacked me, saying that he was “not expecting me to make an effort.” Despite his abusive words, I still made the changes that he demanded.

Just one day after the due date of this paper, I scheduled an appointment with the professor and the associate dean at my school. I explained the behavior of this male. Their response was that his behavior was very unprofessional. I needed to have this meeting because no one, especially in a higher education setting deserves to be treated the way I was treated. This male referred to was interested in further pursuing a PhD. Besides, he was formerly in the US military, which is very surprising to me, considering his character issues and him physically being very out of shape.

I was able to talk with the professor and the associate dean long before the conferral of degrees. However, I did not receive any updates after this meeting, which kind of made me angry. I don’t know if the school took any measures or disciplinary action against this particular student. I don’t know if the school actually took this issue seriously. Is it possible that no disciplinary action took place? Is it possible that students who exhibit such behavior get dismissed from the program for such unprofessional behavior?

I just received a confirmation from my graduate program adviser that I successfully completed my two-year-long master’s program. I had a negative experience in my second year because of a mandatory group project that I had to do in order to graduate.This group project was done under a certain level of guidance by a professor. The first semester of this group project was only one credit, while the second semester of this course was three credits. Much of the drama occurred in the last two days before the due date of the group’s final paper, which was via email. I did not get along with two out of four former group members because those two bullied me and badmouthed me behind my back. It was evident to me that their actions were coordinated. Out of these two perpetrators, one was a female who was around my age (mid-20s), while the other one, the male, was 33 years old. I will only talk about the male here.

There were three different paper drafts that we had to submit in the second semester of this group project class. Both of these individuals referred to were procrastinators and felt like the rules of the group did not apply to them. However, they were the most domineering ones in the group and consistently used foul language in group settings. The 33-year-old male was the group editor, but he was an extreme procrastinator who would literally wait until the last moment to do things. He did not do much editing in the first two drafts, and right on the day before the due date of the third and final paper, he suggested to the group to make huge changes. He hardly communicated with me, so I wasn’t even expecting any form of communication from him. Besides, I had another paper that was due at exactly the same day and time as this group project paper. By the time that he started communicating via email to the entire group to make significant changes, I was already much more focused on my other paper and I looked at his email much later. He had sent me an angry message asking if I “still wanted to be a part” of the project. Excuse me, I was involved in this project, but he chose to be actively involved at the very end. I replied to his email, politely asking why he could not make his suggestions much sooner, despite his angry tone in the email that he personally sent to me. What he did in his response was that he broke down every single sentence that I wrote, and commented on how I was ‘wrong’ or did “not know what I was talking about.” In the process, he even dropped the F-bomb twice at me and called me “passive-aggressive” for “challenging him.” He was clearly the aggressive one.
He attacked me, saying that he was “not expecting me to make an effort.” Despite his abusive words, I still made the changes that he demanded.

Just one day after the due date of this paper, I scheduled an appointment with the professor and the associate dean at my school. I explained the behavior of this male. Their response was that his behavior was very unprofessional. I needed to have this meeting because no one, especially in a higher education setting deserves to be treated the way I was treated. This male referred to was interested in further pursuing a PhD. Besides, he was formerly in the US military, which is very surprising to me, considering his character issues and him physically being very out of shape.

I was able to talk with the professor and the associated dean long before the conferral of degrees. However, I did not receive any updates after this meeting, which kind of made me angry. I don’t know if the school took any measures or disciplinary action against this particular student. I don’t know if the school actually took this issue seriously. Is it possible that no disciplinary action took place? Is it possible that students who exhibit such behavior get dismissed from the program for such unprofessional behavior?

I graduated from my master’s program in the US, but I have a question. My master’s program was two years long, and in my second year, I had to work on a two-semester long group project, which was a requirement for students in my program. This experience was a very negative one for me because I felt bullied by two out of four of my former group members. Much of this harassment was done via email and those two group members coordinated with each other in attacking me. Both of them were very foul-mouthed and had condescending attitudes. One of the students used the F-word at me twice in an email, while the other student tried to omit my name from the final group paper.
I talked with the professor of this course and an associate dean at the school. Both of their reactions were that their behaviors were unprofessional, however, I don’t know what happened because I was never updated with what the school’s course of action would be in relation to those two students. The student who used the F-bomb at me had plans to continue on to a PhD program (even though I don’t actually know if he got accepted into one).

In cases where a student, especially one in a graduate school program demonstrates extremely unprofessional behavior towards another peer, how does the school take action? I would like to know because it seems to me that my school never cared about my situation.

There have been stories recently of students who were expelled from university for derogatory things they said online. It got me wondering if a student would be expelled for saying something derogatory online, except when they were a minor. In this scenario the student wouldn’t have been 17 (right before they entered college) but more around the age of 13-15 when they made the comments (many years before enrolling).

I know this probably depends on each university’s own code of conduct, but I have no specific institution in mind. Answers based off your own university are fine, and I’m more interested in Canadian universities (although members of universities in the US, Europe, etc are also welcomed to share any info).

To me it doesn’t make much sense for a student to be punished for something they said years ago as a young teenager, but I digress.

Attention has been drawn recently to an incident that occurred at a scientific conference and its sequelae described in this article:

The fuss started when [Prof. X] and [Prof. Y] ended up in the same crowded elevator during a conference at a Hilton in San Francisco last month. [Prof. Y] said she offered to press the floor buttons for people in the elevator, whom she described as mostly conference attendees and all, except one other woman, white middle-aged men. Instead of saying a floor, [Prof. X] smiled and asked for the women’s lingerie department “and all his buddies laughed,” [Prof. Y] wrote in a complaint, the details of which [Prof. X] disputed.

[Prof. Y] […] then wrote to the association’s executive director, who forwarded the complaint to the group’s Committee on Professional Rights and Responsibilities, which determined that [Prof. X] had violated the conduct code.

[Prof. X] insists it never should have gotten to that point because he tried to resolve the problem informally, as the association’s conduct code recommends. After being informed that his conduct was under investigation, [Prof. X] wrote [Prof. Y] an email assuring her that “I certainly had no desire to insult women or to make you feel uncomfortable.” He suggested that [Prof. Y], who was born in Romania and raised in Israel, might have misinterpreted his remark. When he was young, in the 1950s, he said, it was a “standard gag line” to ask the elevator operator for the hardware or lingerie floor as though one were in a department store.

“Like you, I am strongly opposed to the exploitation, coercion, or humiliation of women,” [Prof. X] wrote. “As such evils continue, it seems to me to make sense to direct our attention to real offenses, not those that are imagined or marginal. By making a complaint to ISA that I consider frivolous — and I expect, will be judged this way by the ethics committee — you may be directing time and effort away from the real offenses that trouble us both.”

[Prof. X] was told to write an “unequivocal apology” to [Prof. Y] and submit a written copy by May 15 to the association’s executive committee. The apology should focus on [Prof. X’s] actions, rather than [Prof. Y’s] perceptions of them, it said, adding that if he failed to comply, the executive committee would consider appropriate sanctions.

As a male member of academe, I am worried. I feel bewildered and fear that I might also offend someone some day.

How can I avoid committing an equivalent faux pas in an academic environment, such as an international conference?

Attention has been drawn recently to an incident that occurred at a scientific conference and its sequelae described in this article:

The fuss started when [Prof. X] and [Prof. Y] ended up in the same crowded elevator during a conference at a Hilton in San Francisco last month. [Prof. Y] said she offered to press the floor buttons for people in the elevator, whom she described as mostly conference attendees and all, except one other woman, white middle-aged men. Instead of saying a floor, [Prof. X] smiled and asked for the women’s lingerie department “and all his buddies laughed,” [Prof. Y] wrote in a complaint, the details of which he disputed, to the association later that day. […]

After being informed that his conduct was under investigation, [Prof. X] wrote [Prof. Y] an email assuring her that “I certainly had no desire to insult women or to make you feel uncomfortable.” He suggested that [Prof. Y], who was born in Romania and raised in Israel, might have misinterpreted his remark. When he was young, in the 1950s, he said, it was a “standard gag line” to ask the elevator operator for the hardware or lingerie floor as though one were in a department store.

“Like you, I am strongly opposed to the exploitation, coercion, or humiliation of women,” [Prof. X] wrote. “As such evils continue, it seems to me to make sense to direct our attention to real offenses, not those that are imagined or marginal. By making a complaint to ISA that I consider frivolous — and I expect, will be judged this way by the ethics committee — you may be directing time and effort away from the real offenses that trouble us both.”

This incident has escalated to the point that the academic organization that organized the conference has decided to sanction Prof. X.

As a male member of academe, I am worried. I feel bewildered and fear that I might also offend someone some day.

How can I avoid committing an equivalent faux pas in an academic environment, such as an international conference?

I copied (and failed to cite) two lines of code from the OpenJDK source for an undergraduate Data Structures project. Yet, the code comparison shows an alarming amount (40%) of similarity. Here is the side-by-side comparison with my file.

Based on these grounds, my professor wants to give me a -100% on the assignment, which would bring down my overall grade by 15% total, probably causing me to not make the C-wall (depending on how well I do on the final exam). For this reason (and my conscious), I decided to appeal.

However, I believe that most of the similarity in the report comes from my copying of lines 142-152:

static int hash(int h) {
    h ^= (h >>> 20) ^ (h >>> 12);
    return h ^ (h >>> 7) ^ (h >>> 4);
}

I did not cite these two lines, but I did intend to delete them later.

In fact, this whole function can be removed without affecting the program at all, which results in this file comparison.

Then, only lines 114-126 are a problem:

MyEntry<K, V>[] newArr = new MyEntry[newSize];
// Copy
for (int i = 0; i < data.length; i++) {
    MyEntry<K, V> e = data[i];
    if (e != null) {
        data[i] = null;
        do {
            MyEntry<K, V> next = e.next;
            int j = e.hash % newSize;
            e.next = newArr[j];
            newArr[j] = e;
            e = next;
        } while (e != null);

However, this snippet is my own. I wrote these lines without referencing HashMap.java, and this is a common algorithm for chaining that I can explain thoroughly, and have known about for years.

Yes, I know the fact I copied the other two lines compromises my integrity and made the 20% into 40% to begin with, so how can I prove this?

I’m not sure how to defend this whole case before a Student Conduct Board who knows very little about programming. My board hearing is in a month. Does these two snippets of code constitute plagiarism of my entire project? Is -15% to my overall grade fair?

Sidenotes:

  • Our projects are pretty extensive since we aren’t allowed to use java.util.* (like 1k+ lines for each project in 8 days), and I did not copy any other code. I’d say the actual data structure implementation is only meant to take about 1/5 our time spent per project.
  • Over 30% of the class has been reported for academic integrity violations on projects over the semester, and the newly graduated professor doesn’t seem to think himself or his assignments are the problem. I should have caught onto the warning before this last project of the semester…