As you know, there are journals -predatory journals- which are just publishing scams, without actual peer review, etc. but look like genuine ones, and it is a problem for the honest researcher to avoid them.

Until recently there was a free blacklist, Jerry Beall’s (which had flaws), and now there is Cabell’s list, which apart from being behind a paywall, may not distinguish predatory journals from new ones (see this review).

As the number of publications seems ever-increasing, I feel new, legitimate journals will play an important role in next years. I would be willing to publish in one of them sometime, but I don’t know how to identify them. For the moment being, each time I receive an email promoting a starting journal (as some may in good faith do), I just dismiss it as being a predatory one.

So the question is: Are there good ways of knowing that a new journal is legitimate? Perhaps is there some kind of white list?

I am at a loss of what to do. I had started working on this project, a systematic review and meta-analysis back in undergrad. I was a senior. Long story short, for a while my manuscript was going well. Come August 2016, my mentor stopped communicating with me in the final stages. Weeks of no responses predominated, and as a result I emailed the Chair of the department on 3 separate occasions (over a total of 7 months). I was promised 3 different deadlines, all of which went unfulfilled. I finally emailed the dean in April when we got close to my final deadline of May 1, 2017. I got my edits, but I was 3 days away from leaving the area because I was heading off to graduate school.

I ended up telling my mentor I didn’t want to publish or take this situation into a new institution, but if I found someone who could advise and help me with the situation I would reach out to her. I expressed I had felt we had failed to meet the deadline and the outlook was bleak. She responded positively saying we hadn’t missed the deadline, but if I were open to forfeiting my primary authorship stance then she’d be glad to completely finish the manuscript. I took this as a direct offense to the work I had done because I had decided on the topic, done the data extraction, results, conclusions, and limitations of the paper.

I have found someone but am worried my old mentor will not follow through or will hinder the process again. My new adviser suggested I send her an ultimatum and deadline for her final comments for the manuscript and submit to a journal. However, as I am not a researcher, am going to grad school to be a clinician (current graduation 2019), and only have a bachelor’s degree, I am scared if I do this then I may lose her support for the manuscript.

How should I proceed?

Recently, the journal where my paper was published got blacklisted in a so-called blacklist. I was very surprised since the journal existed more than ten years.

My questions:

  1. How to drop the paper from the indexing databases, such as Scopus. What will be the consequences and what are the procedures?

  2. If I will keep the paper in this journal, how it will affect my academic career?

Jeffrey Beall removed his list of predatory journals from the internet this past Sunday. While the reasons for his doing this are not yet public, this is a real loss of a valuable service. Does anyone know of similar services available to the general public?

Edit: This other question is definitely relevant, but that approach is more appropriate for finding top journals rather than identifying bottom ones. I.e., following that method would probably exclude lots of valid, lower-tier journals. Are there any approaches to easily identifying a predatory publisher?

A colleague and I recently submitted a paper to a journal with an impressive-sounding name, the “International Journal of Artificial Intelligence and Computational Research”. According to their website,

IJAICR is a referred [sic] journal in the field of computer science, artificial intelligence and soft computing methods.

It was accepted two days after we submitted it. That’s too fast. We were suspicious. Although the journal said that all papers are peer-reviewed, we could not see how that was done in two days. Plus, we received no comments from the reviewers. Also, the submission guidelines didn’t ask for a “blind” copy (without our names or any references to who we were).

But wait, there’s more.

The acceptance letter asked us to send them US$300 to publish it. We did not. We’ve withdrawn our submission and will submit a new version of the paper to a more reputable journal in the coming months.

How might we make a better choice of respectable journals before we submit next time?

I constantly receive emails from editors asking me to submit papers for their journals.

However, only a handful of them originate from a trustworthy source. The vast majority are just scams — journals with no reputation at all, willing to publish an(y) article for a fee.

My biggest problem with that is that I lost one or two real good opportunities to publish because I dismissed the email, thinking it was a scam.

Is there a list that I can use to easily check the reputation of a journal, in order to avoid this to happen?

I’m an inexperienced researcher and I made the stupid mistake of submitting my article to a predatory journal. I realised the journal was fake when they failed to provide the reviewers comments.

I then requested that the article be withdrawn. I received an email back from the ‘editor’ saying that the article had been withdrawn and guaranteeing that they wouldn’t publish the article without my permission. I didn’t sign the transfer of copyright, pay any money and the article hasn’t appeared on their website.

My question is whether my article is now a write off? Can I resubmit it elsewhere or just write off as a bad learning experience? I would really like to salvage if if possible.

I’m an inexperienced researcher and I made the stupid mistake of submitting my article to a predatory journal. I realised the journal was fake when they failed to provide the reviewers comments.

I then requested that the article be withdrawn. I received an email back from the ‘editor’ saying that the article had been withdrawn and guaranteeing that they wouldn’t publish the article without my permission. I didn’t sign the transfer of copyright, pay any money and the article hasn’t appeared on their website.

My question is whether my article is now a write off? Can I resubmit it elsewhere or just write off as a bad learning experience? I would really like to salvage if if possible.

Is there a readily compiled, contiunously updated list of email addresse and/or domain names used in spam messages from predatory journals or conferences, or phrases or keywords that could be used to safely filter out such spam messages in email clients (without removing non-spam emails)?