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I have written this paper and I would like to ask, via email, from some professors in other universities to give me feedback. How is the best way to write such a request? First, what should I write in the email subject box? Then, how do I write the body of email?

I recently finished taking an undergraduate class and I enjoyed it. I was thinking of emailing the prof and saying this, but I don’t know if it’s appropriate or not, for a few reasons…

1) I would have already said this in the class evaluations, which the prof will read.

2) More importantly, I recently received my final grade and it was good (A to A+). If I email now, it might come off as an implied “thank you” for giving me a good mark, even though I mean nothing of the sort.

My question is whether or not such an email would be appropriate. In the email, I would also express gratitude for the extra effort the prof put in (as they gave me resources to study the subject deeper on my own).

A postdoc has published some works that I am interested. I have some questions about the work, and I would like to share some idea about the topic.

Is it considered polite to send the email to the postdoc and CC his PI? If I email the PI only, I might have to wait for a long time. However, the postdoc could not even be in the city. So I am not sure what is the best and politest practice.

I’m an electronics engineering sophomore at an Indian university, particularly interested in quantum computing, quantum information theory and quantum engineering. However, the problem I’m facing is that we do not have the possibility to take up extra theory courses in computer science (e.g. complexity theory, analysis of algorithms) or mathematics (topology, differential geometry, discrete mathematics, etc). I feel these theory courses are extremely important to understand quantum computing properly (more so, with stuff like topological quantum computing and relativistic quantum information, coming up). By the end of the 4 years of my undergraduate course while I’ll likely be having sufficient background for further study in the area of quantum “engineering”, I feel I’ll be lacking in the theoretical aspects. For the record, I do have some experience with research in the area of quantum computing (I’m currently pursuing a undergraduate research project at a nearby university in my city). Also, I’ve been trying to learn some of the mathematics and computer science topics on my own, using various online resources.

For that reason I was thought if it would be possible for me to apply for a masters degree in computer science/mathematics, after my undergrad, before directly applying for a PhD in quantum computing. I feel that such a masters degree focused on the theory would make my PhD application stronger. A course like the one offered by Oxford: MSc in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science would probably be perfect for me (at least that’s what it seems from a reading of the course contents). But, I’m a bit worried because the acceptance rate in such courses is already very low (for example Oxford has only 17 places available in this course while on average 115 people apply for it per year).

So, in short my question is: Is it okay if I mail the head of the Math/Computer Science department head, asking whether they accept applications from electronics engineering students and what I can possibly do as an undergraduate, to improve my odds of getting accepted to such a course? (For example, the heads of activity of the Oxford’s Quantum Group are listed here). Also, if yes, how should I frame my email? Suggestions are appreciated. Thank you.

I’m an incoming grad student at a US university and I’ve been asked to set up my email alias. The university doesn’t have an explicit policy on what the aliases should look like, but I’ve noticed most faculty and grad students have gone with either of the following:

firstname.lastname@acme.edu
lastname@acme.edu

However, my first name is shorter, available, and easier to spell.
It’s an unusual name in the US (which helped me secure firstname.com), but it’s four characters and hard to get wrong.
Therefore, I’m thinking of going with:

firstname@acme.edu

Could that be interpreted as inappropriate/unprofessional/overly casual by some, or would it be fine? It’s one of the top-five programs in economics in the US – everyone seemed friendly on my fly-out and they’re probably among the less formal departments I’ve visited.

I recently sent a thank you note to one of my college professors via email and never got a reply from her. I have not heard from her in a week and being that she is retired I would have thought that as a courtesy, she could have replied to my email (i.e. thank you for your kind words). Is it normal for retired professors to not reply to these sorts of emails?

I’m an incoming grad student at a US university and I’ve been asked to set up my email alias. The university doesn’t have an explicit policy on what the aliases should look like, but I’ve noticed most faculty and grad students have gone with either firstname.lastname@acme.edu or lastname@acme.edu. However, because my first name is shorter, available, and easier to spell, I’m thinking of going with firstname@acme.edu — could that be interpreted as inappropriate/unprofessional/overly casual by some, or would it be fine?

I have been greeting all my professors as “Professor (last name)” in emails I send to them. I think this is normal, but at my university all the professors/lecturers use their first name when ending emails they send.

For example, if the teacher’s name was “Joe Smith”, they might end an email they send as follows:

Regards,
Joe

This behavior is the case with all of the professors I’ve had, so it seems to be something that’s global to the university. Should I be addressing my professors by their first name in emails? I would have done so already, but I don’t want to sound disrespectful. I’ve looked it up but haven’t found any guidelines my university gives on addressing faculty.

Also, I think this question is different from others because as far as I know, my university is an exception with all professors using their first name.