I will be working in Munich, Germany for a relatively small engineering company. I have always wanted to obtain an engineering PhD on a part-time basis.

I have been intrigued by the “individual doctorate” option in Germany, which seems to allow the flexibility to work full-time or part-time and thus continue to move forward in one’s career.

My questions are:

  1. Is this option of an individual doctorate generally available to anyone who can find a professor/supervisor to work with them throughout the research agenda?

  2. If one’s current project at their job qualifies as original work and one can find a willing supervisor, can one simply proceed with their work at their current job and simultaneously earn a PhD?

  3. Is it generally feasible to work full-time and obtain a PhD via the “individual doctorate” path? If so, how common is this?

I want to mathematically model reality and use these models to solve problems. Will a degree in Computer Science Engineering allow me to do this?

Additional background. Reading the overview of a master’s graduate degree (MSC to be exact) in modelling mechanical engineer, it really spiked my interest. I am not a mathematical genius though, and I need to at least see applications and more or less concrete problems/implementations. Also relevant could be that I am a senior in high school and I learned programming all by myself.

Systems I would find interesting to get to know better by creating mathematical models

I am most interested in physics and general mathematical patterns, like the approach found in Albert-László Barabási‘s book Network Science.
I am not interested in specializing in any particular field just because of the field itself.

I am interested in other academics’ experiences with large experiments (especially something like the LHC). To what extent do the “engineers” who design and build the machine (solder electronics, assemble quadrupole magnets, etc) interact with “scientists” who determine the program (who might want to test their 11-dimensional model etc)? Do the two sides take an active interest in each other’s work and give constructive suggestions to one another? Are the technicians all hired locally? How many in the “engineering” camp have PhDs?

(It’s also possible to label the two groups “experimentalists” vs “theorists”, though for the former I really mean people involved in the construction and day-to-day operations – I’m not interested in semantics here)

While the Higgs was at a sigma of ~4, I heard that postdocs and PhD students at CERN could volunteer for maintenance and similar tasks, and that those who did would have their names on the “Higgs paper” (hence the notoriously large author lists). Was this true and is it still the case?

I am interested in other academics’ experiences with large experiments (especially something like the LHC). To what extent do the “engineers” who design and build the machine (solder electronics, assemble quadrupole magnets, etc) interact with “scientists” who determine the program (who might want to test their 11-dimensional model etc)? Do the two sides take an active interest in each other’s work and give constructive suggestions to one another? Are the technicians all hired locally? How many in the “engineering” camp have PhDs?

(It’s also possible to label the two groups “experimentalists” vs “theorists”, though for the former I really mean people involved in the construction and day-to-day operations – I’m not interested in semantics here)

While the Higgs was at a sigma of ~4, I heard that postdocs and PhD students at CERN could volunteer for maintenance and similar tasks, and that those who did would have their names on the “Higgs paper” (hence the notoriously large author lists). Was this true and is it still the case?

We are currently using Moodle in rather primitive way, for sharing assigments, uploading homeworks, sharing pdf course materials and similar. Most examples of implementing elearning in eg. traditional mechanics courses I have heard about or saw involve extensive programming language skills and are done through large projects.
Effort needed to make such elearning systems is greatest obstacle in better use of elearning in my department.

How to implement elearning in higher engineering education? How much time did you spend to build your classes? Can platform change bring benefit or just the way you use it is most important?
Using some opensource or commercial platform or building your own system, which is best approach?

Which e-learning or distance learning tools or platforms are used in engineering courses, university, college or specialists programs? How to implement elearning in higher engineering education? How much time did you spend to build your classes? Can platform change bring benefit or just the way you use it is most important?

Some good practice examples and links to published works are also welcome. We are currently using Moodle in rather primitive way and I would like to learn about alternatives educators from engineering field use. Most examples of implementing elearning in eg. mechanics I have heard about or saw involve extensive programming language skills and are done through large projects.

I’m interested which e-learning or distance learning tools or platforms use teachers in engineering courses, university, collage or specialists programs.

I would like to get feedback from lecturers, professors, asociates teaching engineering courses. Please write which courses mentioned tool is used for, some good practice examples and links are also welcome. I’m also interested in published works on this topic (but only for engineering courses).

I’m currently finishing my coursework in a PhD program in a moderately quantitative social sciences program at a good university in the United States. However, due to both meagre job prospects and the realisation that I have a strong affinity more hands on kinds of work, I have been thinking that I may want to change career trajectories by pursuing a degree in either geotechnical or petroleum engineering.

However, I do not have too many science credits from my undergrad, which I finished in three years before moving on immediately into my graduate program. Would it be better to reapply for admission to an undergraduate program for a BSE, or directly petition a graduate program for admission as a Masters student, while perhaps taking some science/engineering credits as a non-degree student at my current institution?

If it matters, I am currently 23.

Thanks!

This question already has an answer here:

I have submitted a manuscript to a reputed Elsevier journal. After 2 months of peer review process, the response was “moderate revision has been requested” and they told me that the new version is required within 1 month.
After making the necessary adjustments, I have resubmitted the revised manuscript back on the 14th of October 2017. On the 21st of October the status changed from “with editor” to “under review”. To date (16th December) the status is “under review”.
In fact, I had made some readings about late reviews, I found that reviews are normally due 14 days after the invitation is accepted by the reviewer.
Should I worry about manuscript rejection?
Thanks in advance for your help