In mathematics, it is usual to call terminal results “theorems” and intermediate results “propositions” or even “lemmas” depending on importance and place in the overarching proof. Suppose that one is refereeing a paper where the authors have decided to call almost all their results “theorems”, making a paper with a large number of “theorems” that even emeritus professors don’t usually reach by the end of their career. (Such theorems include computation that could conceivably given to as end of year exams to master students. Not to diminish the importance of the paper, the actual theorems are good, but the 20 others are not theorems. There are more theorems than pages.)

Would it be acceptable and well-received to suggest toning it down? Or would it be overstepping and rude? This is not just a philosophical question: I truly believe that it makes the paper harder to reader, because it is difficult to separate the wheat from the chaff, so to say. A reader does not know what is important and what is not.

In mathematics, it is usual to call terminal results “theorems” and intermediate results “propositions” or even “lemmas” depending on importance and place in the overarching proof. Suppose that one is refereeing a paper where the authors have decided to call almost all their results “theorems”, making a paper with a large number of “theorems” that even emeritus professors don’t usually reach by the end of their career. (Such theorems include computation that could conceivably given to as end of year exams to master students. Not to diminish the importance of the paper, the actual theorems are good, but the 20 others are not theorems. There are more theorems than pages.)

Would it be acceptable and well-received to suggest toning it down? Or would it be overstepping and rude? This is not just a philosophical question: I truly believe that it makes the paper harder to reader, because it is difficult to separate the wheat from the chaff, so to say. A reader does not know what is important and what is not.

I had a class last week and I was 10 minutes late. I missed part of the class, and I want to write an email to my professor to arrange a time to meet.

I prepared this email:

Dear …..

I’ve missed part of the previous session and this part is not clear for me. Could I meet up with you this week so you can explain it to me?

Thank you

Is it appropriate?

P, a postdoc applicant, lists 3 referees (A, B and C) on her strong application.

  • A knows P‘s work best and gives a mixed (guarded) assessment.
  • B knows P‘s work moderately well and gives a great assessment.
  • C knows P‘s work least and gives a great assessment.
  • S and T, a recent supervisor and a recent employer, are not listed as referees.

Can the recruiter contact S and T for further feedback? On the one hand, they are not listed as referees, but on the other hand, the applicant has not requested not to contact these people.

But I don’t understand if it is ethical because he was the one who identified the problem. I wouldn’t have thought of the answer if he hadn’t asked the question. I am an undergraduate and this is my first time in research. I do not understand the process, I think. But is this how research works? What is the proper way to proceed now?

But I don’t understand if it is ethical because he was the one who identified the problem. I wouldn’t have thought of the answer if he hadn’t asked the question. I am an undergraduate and this is my first time in research. I do not understand the process, I think. But is this how research works? What is the proper way to proceed now?

I am applying to a PhD program. I worked in the past with researcher A from research team T who was my bachelor thesis supervisor. Now, I am applying to a PhD progam within the research team T and also to another universities.

Researcher A would be a perfect candidate to ask for a reference letter, since my internship under his supervision went really well. However, I am wondering whether or not it would be appropriate to ask him, since I would use it to apply to other universities (he would know that of course).

Details:

  • I already applied at team T and am waiting for news.
  • A is not the team director but the team is quite small and A knows I applied there.
  • A is not the one who would supervise the PhD I applied to.

I am afraid that asking him for a reference letter could make him think that I am not that much interested in that lab L and that this could have a negative impact on my application at this lab.

I have been rejected by a particular university for MS two times now. I really want to get into it to work with a professor. I am thinking of emailing him to ask him what I can do to improve myself to become acceptable. I am trying to improve myself on various fronts that I can think of, so I would like ask him if I am on right path. I am a first generation student and I have no guide to ask, so he is that only one I can think of, to ask these questions. What would be the proper subject line for this? Right now I have “Help needed to improve myself” as subject. In the body, I will explain my situation and ask him if he could give me some of his time. What would be the proper way to proceed in asking for his help?