I hold a degree from a European country, and at that time we didn’t have a system similar to the common “Bachelor + Master”. My degree has been considered as equivalent to a Master by the University of another European country, and in this other University I obtained a Doctorate.

Now, a non-European country has offered me a teaching position, and they want a statement of my undergraduate University, saying that that degree is equivalent to a Master. But this University (where I graduated) tells me that they can’t make a statement of equivalence, they can only certify that I have that degree.
So, who should be the authority that officially takes care of confirming the equivalence?

-addendum-

To complicate things, I graduated before the Bologna Process came into effect.

I hold a degree from an European country, and at that time we didn’t have a system similar to the common “Bacelor + Master”. My degree has been considered as equivalent to a Master by the University of another European country, and in this other University I obtained a Doctorate.

Now, a non-european country has offered me a teaching position, and they want a statement of my undergraduate University, saying that that degree is equivalent to a Master. But this University (where I graduated) tells me that they can’t make a statement of equivalence, they can only certify that I have that degree.
So, who should be the authority that officially takes care of confirming the equivalence?

How to find out if someone holds a Doctorate in Electrical Engineering from Technical University of Budapest?
I know that the university changed its name to Budapest University of Technology and Economics.

He claims he got a Doctorate in Electrical Engineering from that university in 1972. What I know is that he has a professional “engineering degree” from that university registered in the Engineer Association in my country. But the translation of his degree does not say Doctor nor PhD, just electrical engineer. The certificate is in Hungarian with a translation to Spanish, but translation has no word of “Doctor” anywhere.

Another thing is that I find no record of any article nor paper nor publication from him on any journal. Well obviously I can not look for in Hungarian language.

When I finished my PhD (in math), I was registered in math genealogy project and I have one paper published on a reputable math journal.

Is there a web-page similar to Math Genealogy Project for electrical engineering?

I have also written to the university but have no reply until now. I do not know also if Hungarian Universities may release records of former students.

Is there anyway to verify that person really holds a doctorate? Or how can I prove he does not have it?

How to find out if someone holds a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Technical University of Budapest?
I know that the university changed its name to Budapest University of Technology and Economics.

The person in question is “Hector Felix Villarroel Pedrazas”. He claims he got a PhD in Electrical Engineering from that university in 1972. What I know is that he has a professional “engineering degree” from that university registered in the Engineer Association in my country. But the translation of his degree does not say Doctor nor PhD, just electrical engineer. The certificate is in Hungarian with a translation to Sapnish, but translation has no word of “Doctor” anywhere.

Another thing is that I find no record of any article nor paper nor publication from him on any journal.

When I finished my PhD (in math), I was register in math genealogy project and I have one paper published on a reputable math journal.

Is there a web-page similar to Math Genealogy Project for electrical engineering?

I have also written to the university but have no reply until now. I do not know also if Hungarian Universities may release records of former students.

Is there anyway to verify that person really holds a doctorate? Or how can I prove he does not have it?

Thank you.

I am asking this question because I simply do not know.

The story is that some department (northern continental Europe for what is worth) is (unofficially for the moment) negotiating an Assistant Professor position. The offered teaching/research load is 50-50 which sounds OK in theory. In reality, this translates to a minimum of 3 courses per year plus supervision of bachelor’s and master’s candidates as well as administrative tasks.

On the other side of the spectrum, they do not offer any starting package whatsoever: no PhD students, not even basic equipment like laptop or traveling allowance, only a relatively good (for EU standards) salary with no additional benefits (married/child, whatever). They said that I should (imperative hint) apply for external funding (i.e., more work).

Thus my questions:

  1. Is this considered a true 50-50 research/teaching? I do not see how is this possible. It seems that for research would be only a modest 30% of the time and mostly during summer which is absurd for younger people (more ideas for new research)

  2. Is this considered a normal offer? I would like to see other people’s opinions/experiences.

The argument for the offer is basically: take any position that comes in the way, given that the academic job market can be brutal. But I am really afraid this would mean the end of my research at least in its current form, given also that I won’t be able to even have any PhD student at least in the next 3 or so years at least, if I ever have them.

I am asking this question because I simply do not know.

The story is that some department (northern condinental europe for what is worth) is (unofficially for the moment) negotiating an Assistant Professor position. The official teaching/research load is 50-50 which sounds OK. This translates to 3 courses (minimum) per year + bachelor + master student supervision + some administrative tasks.

On the other side of the spectrum, they do not offer any starting package: no PhD students, not even equipment, only a relatively good (for EU standards) salary with no additional benefits (married/child, whatever). They said that I should (imperative hint) apply for external funding (i.e. more work).

Thus my questions:

  1. Is this considered a true 50-50 research/teaching? I do not see how is this possible. It seems that for research would be only a modest 30% of the time and mostly during summer.

  2. Is this considered a normal offer?

The argument for the offer is basically: take any position that comes in the way, given that the academic job market can be bruttal. But I am really afraid this would mean the end of my research at least in its current form, given also that I won’t be able to even have any PhD student at least in the next 2/3 of years at best, if I ever have.

I am asking this question because I simply do not know.

The story is that some department (nortern condinental europe for what is worth) is (unofficially for the moment) negotiating an Assistant Professor position. The official teaching/research load is 50-50 which sounds OK. This translates to 3 courses (minimum) per year + bachelor + master student supervision + some administrative tasks.

On the other side of the spectrum, they do not offer any starting package: no PhD students, not even equipment, only a relatively good (for EU standards) salary with no additional benefits (married/child, whatever). They said that I should (imperative hint) apply for external funding (i.e. more work).

Thus my questions:

  1. Is this considered a true 50-50 research/teaching? I do not see how is this possible. It seems that for research would be only a modest 30% of the time and mostly during summer.

  2. Is this considered a normal offer?

The argument for the offer is basically: take any position that comes in the way, given that the academic job market can be bruttal. But I am really afraid this would mean the end of my research at least in its current form, given also that I won’t be able to even have any PhD student at least in the next 2/3 of years at best, if I ever have.

I had a brief skype job interview for the position of department head at a mid-size/rank university in England. One of the key questions was about my plans for the international student recruitment. Contrary to other questions, I felt that they are not satisfied with my answer because I really didn’t have a special plan for this. Still, I think a department head can support this but cannot think of any new plan to do so.

Do you have a convincing answer to this interview question?

I plan to enter graduate school (MA+PhD) in September 2018, which means I have something of a ‘gap year situation’ ahead of me [not in a strict sense, as I’ve been working for a number of years now]. I want to use this unstructured time ahead the best way I can.

If you were in my position, how would you spend these spare 12 months before grad school officially begins and the clock starts ticking? How would you prepare for what’s ahead, what would you focus on?

It goes without saying that I have already given these questions a lot of careful consideration, but I’m very curious to learn how others would approach this topic; especially, current PhD candidates, postdocs, and lecturers/professors. Knowing what you now know, if you could go back, how would you spend a spare year like that?

Some background:

  • My field is social/cultural anthropology.
  • My ultimate goal (grad school and beyond) is to prepare a CV and a research portfolio, which will aid me in launching an academic career in Europe.
  • I have a BA in anthropology and an unrelated MA,
  • I currently freelance (unrelated field); I have plenty of spare time, and can arrange my schedule in whatever way I see fit.
  • I live in a mid-size European city (not a capital); can’t move anywhere this year, but can likely do some limited traveling.
  • There’s a small anthropology department here, but I’m not affiliated with it, and never was. My degree is from the US.
  • I can speak the local language fairly well.
  • The grad school (next year) will be in a different county, and learning the new language will be one of my key objectives this year. The language of instruction will be English, however.

Note: Not sure if I made this clear, but I’m not looking for suggestions such as “travel for fun,” or “get a new hobby.” I want to use these 12 months in the most productive way possible.

In response to feedback from comments: I would like the advice focused on: setting myself up to do outstanding work in grad school and beyond (postdocs, etc). I am not concerned with the “getting into grad school” part here.