I’m from Brazil and the metric system for grades here (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grading_systems_by_country#Brazil) is different from UK.
So, I’m an undergraduate student who wants to apply to a Master Degree in Physics – DAMTP.
But, I don’t know what exactly is the “overall grades” which they are requiring here https://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/international-qualifications
I mean, I must to have 9/10 in each of the subjects or just the “final grade of all the course subjects” (given by some sort of process like weighted average)?

I got mostly A’s during 9th grade. However, I mostly got B’s during 10th grade. I went to one AP class during 9th grade and one AP class in 10th grade, both of which I got B’s in all semesters. I mostly go to Honors classes. I attended the chess and robotics clubs during 9th grade and the chess and speech/debate clubs during 10th grade. I currently have a 3.7 GPA. I have still two more years of high school. Will I be able to get into a highly selective university?

Related: How to motivate students to complete low-point homework?

One of my undergraduate professors had a similar problem to the OP’s in the above question, that is, that students would skip many minor low-point assignments in favor of studying for big exams, and the professor felt that not completing every single assignment resulted in a lower-quality learning experience even though a student’s average still might be passing or even excellent.

The professor’s solution was a policy that any student who failed to complete all assignments would be automatically assigned a zero for the course. That is, the student did not have an opportunity to accept a zero for the assignment that was not done – they would instead get an automatic F for the course. There was no requirement that each assignment be perfect, or even good – the requirement was that you had to at least attempt and turn something in for each assignment.

Are there any problems with this strategy from a pedagogical or ethics perspective? Obviously, some universities permit this and some do not, and the instructor in question did announce this policy in the syllabus at the beginning of the course, but I’m asking from a more general or best practices perspective. It seems to me that this is a non-optimal solution, more specifically one that is using an academic assessment system (grades/GPA) improperly as a behavioral management technique. That is, this strategy is similar/analogous to dropping a student’s grade from a B to a C because they brought a weapon to class, or (in reverse) restricting a student from attending a campus dance because they did not demonstrate sufficient mastery of Boyle’s Law (implementing a behavioral intervention when an academic one such as a lowered grade would have been more appropriate).

Is this a fair assessment of the situation, or is such a strategy a legitimate tool?

Obviously, the minimum level of effort required to constitute “completing” an assignment was vague and something I did not actually inquire into – one might wonder whether or not turning in a piece of paper with “I like pie, here is Boyle’s Law, Boyle’s Law is great, the answer to all of the questions on this assignment is THREE.” would have sufficed (well, it would have been more than a blank page!). That also concerns me – whether or not being able to identify a boundary between making random guesses that effectively constitute not trying at all and an entirely incompetent, but sincere, attempt to complete the assignment (e.g. answers are all wrong, student failed to apply recent best practices covered in lecture, student confused Ohm’s Law with Boyle’s Law, student did not express all results to two significant figures as insisted upon in the instructions, answer was in French when English was required, student claimed that Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy was invented by Freud in 1543 and is generally considered effective in treating acute alcohol intoxication, student claimed that Orange is the New Black is a prime example of early twelfth-century Anglo-Saxon epic poetry, etc.), matters in determining whether or not such a penalty should be allowed.

This question has nothing to do with cheating or plagiarism.

Note: This was NOT Competency-Based Education (CBE). This was a regular engineering class that just happened to have this odd policy tacked on because the instructor was sick to death of students skipping his little 2 point assignments that he thought were critical. The course was otherwise entirely normal.

In response to @aeismail, yes, assignments could be turned in up until the date of the final exam, at least for purposes of not automatically failing the course for failing to turn something in.

It is said in a variety of sources that the graduate admission committee uses a grading system. For example, if the total score is 10, the adcomm will assign 6 points to research and recommendation, 2 points to GRE, and 2 points to GPA. It is also heard that GPA is only used for the initial screen because different school grades differently.

So my question is, where I can find an example grading scheme? i.e. How much is GPA, GRE, research, and recommendation weighted? I need to know what is the best thing to work on for the grad admission.

It is said in a variety of sources that the graduate admission committee uses a grading system. For example, if the total score is 10, the adcomm will assign 6 points to research and recommendation, 2 points to GRE, and 2 points to GPA. It is also heard that GPA is only used for the initial screen because different school grades differently.

So my question is, where I can find an example grading scheme? i.e. How much is GPA, GRE, research, and recommendation weighted? I need to know what is the best thing to work on for the grad admission.

Last week, I did a computer lab for a class. At the end of the instructions was a script that would verify that everything in the lab was done correctly. At the end of the lab, I knew I had done everything correctly; however, the verification script wouldn’t show that everything was done correctly.

The instructor didn’t mention that some additional changes would have to be made to all the lab files for the verification script to pass. I found that out by going to the TAs. I have proof that the professor took notice of this error last week only after I had brought it up, and that I submitted the lab on the same day he did so – albeit a few hours later.

However, I forgot to make the necessary change for one of the lab files, for which I was docked 3 points (out of 20).

The professor has thus far refused to give me those points back.
Assuming the evidence I have of the professor’s oversight and of my same-day submission of the lab satisfies the standard of evidence at the department/university level for a grade dispute/appeal, should I appeal the grade or just let it go?

Okay, what I did was bad. It feels like one of the deadly sins but it’s actually a physiological need… one that haunts me every minute that has gone by since. I slept through my 8am final last Thursday. Not only did I sleep through that, but I didn’t wake up until 11:50am and by the time I scrambled to remember what day it was only to realize just how bad I wish I never woke up…it was already noon. I frantically sent her an email telling her that I slept through it and asked if I could take it in her next section (the syllabus said no, but I was desperate). I found her at her office where she said she couldn’t meet with me unless the Head of Dept. of Marketing (her boss) was present….fast forward to now and the meeting is tomorrow at 12:30, after two other finals starting at 8.

A 0 is the grade you receive when caught cheating, I did not cheat, I did not lie…I slept. I don’t believe an F is a reflective grade of the knowledge and work that I put into that course is an honest one. I don’t believe that a student should learn and learn for an entire semester and then have one time slot to prove their knowledge, people make mistakes and I need a chance. I need to think of an innovative assignment to turn in after the meeting that may interest her in giving me a few points to pass. Or, I need to market to the marketers my case.

Does anyone know what I can do, what I can take upon myself to do even though my professor said there is nothing, to show her that I am willing to put forth the effort and that I am committed to learning.

I am curious about how final transcripts play a role in a graduate program that has already accepted you. For example, if a student with a 3.02 cumulative GPA was accepted into a Physics Ph.D. program that requires a 3.0 cumulative GPA, but does poorly during their last semester of undergraduate classes so their cumulative GPA falls to a 2.98 while still passing all their classes. Would this student be subject to rejection from the Ph.D. program if they were already accepted into?

I am not in this situation, I am just curious what the implications are for doing poorly on your last semester of an undergraduate degree after having already been accepted into a Ph.D./Masters program.

Thank you!