I am currently an international undergraduate studying in the US. When I was in school, I applied to a few different universities, including some in the UK. Two universities in the UK accepted me and I ended up rejecting them both. I am a freshman but I am strongly considering applying to their graduate schools after I graduate here. I understand that GPA, recommendations etc are very important, but would the fact that I had previously applied and rejected an offer from their undergraduate schools have any effect, negative or positive, on my chances of admission to a postgraduate course? Have I burned any bridges?

I can post the names of the specific universities if it’s relevant.

I’m asking this question in the spirit of the question asked here:

I’m a senior-year non-physics major at a university in Pakistan. I will be graduating in 2017, and I have planned to take an year off and apply to graduate school in physics, most probably in the theoretical/mathematical physics research groups.

How many credit hours of physics does an average successful student take before applying to graduate school?

Note: My case, and perhaps the case of other students who find themselves in similar situations is unique: even though I am not a physics major, I have been actively taking physics courses over the last two years. By the time I graduate, I’ll have about 12 under my belt.

For example, Let’s say an American person wants to attend a French university F. F explicitly states that French is the main language of instruction. Why would they require the student to take a language proficiency test for admission? Any prospective student should be aware that he or she has to know French in order to follow the lectures or when taking oral/written exams. Why don’t they simply trust the student? And when he or she thinks to attend even without knowing one single French word, then it’s his or her own fault. (And it doesn’t even matter if it is undergraduate or graduate school)

There are 4 spoken languages in Switzerland (mainly German, French and Italian) and all Swiss students can take an exchange semester at another Swiss university. Swiss universities don’t require for example a French-speaking person to show German language proficiency, if he or she wants to attend a German-speaking university. They explicitly state that it’s in a student’s own responsibility to know German (in this case)

Good morning/afternoon/evening and good night

I am a psych major-undergraduate senior and have actively engaged in being part of and/or conducting research for past 2 years.

My past undergraduate projects are, in a good way, “interdisciplinary”: developmental psychology, cultural psychology (immigrant’s cultural identity development) quantitative (machine learning approaches in big data analytics) psychology, cognitive psychology (priming studies), educational psychology (academic performance), health psychology (drug addition)etc.

This may also means that I am just very-all-over-the-place, indecisive, impulsive, ADHD, and so forth.

I look forward to applying to graduate programs for cognitive psychology or developmental psychology (and if I can pursue developmental clinical psychology later on the way).

However, as you can see, my undergraduate research experience lacks “any kind of” focus in neither discipline.

I am concerned whether this counts as minus.
I just enjoy doing research & running analyses, but perhaps I should have been certain with what kind of research I wanted to be part of in past years.

Thank you as always,
I appreciate any comments!

I have been researching universities and I’m really interested in pursuing Master’s at ETH Zurich in Bioengineering. I noticed a plethora of information in their website and it differed from the information found in the websites of U.S. and Canadian universities (e.g. they didn’t mention obtaining a supervisor before applying to the program).

I have a bachelor’s degree in Biology from Canada (with a somehow low GPA). My question is, how is it hard to get into ETH? I realize it’s competitive, but what is the general portfolio of attractive candidates?
I noticed they required GRE, is it absolutely necessary for students who studied in North America?

Suppose a college senior has made arrangements to do an independent study project with a professor, in order to learn more about a particular topic, with guidance. When it comes to the graduate admissions scrutiny of the transcript, are there any advantages to getting credit for the independent study, as opposed to keeping things informal? Note that an independent study course would not count toward the gpa.

If you want more context, see question.

I have been researching universities and I’m really interested in pursuing Master’s at ETH Zurich in Bioengineering. I noticed a plethora of information in their website and it differed from the information found in the websites of U.S. and Canadian universities (e.g. they didn’t mention obtaining a supervisor before applying to the program).

I have a bachelor’s degree in Biology from Canada (with a somehow low GPA). My question is, how is it hard to get into ETH? I realize it’s competitive, but what is the general portfolio of attractive candidates?
I noticed they required GRE, is it absolutely necessary for students who studied in North America?

I’m Brazilian and am currently trying to apply to this scholarship in New Zealand. However, when asked which “level of study” I will apply for, I see the following list:

  • PhD
  • Masters course
  • Masters thesis
  • Post-Graduate Diploma
  • Post-Graduate Certificate

I only understand what a PhD is. To me, both masters sound like the same thing (in Brazil we have a masters course that you conclude when you present the thesis), and I haven’t the faintest idea of what is the difference between a post-graduate diploma and a certificate.

So what’s the difference between these four categories and are they known as such throughout every English speaking country or are they specific terms used only in NZ?

(also I’m not sure which tags to use here, so correct me if necessary)

This is an unusual situation where I want to take classes and receive credit for my transcript at a particular university but I am not currently a student there.

At some point in the next few years I will applying for a program that I actually do plan to complete, either PhD or master’s, but not until taking more classes at this university.

What are the considerations I should be aware of if I were to apply, be accepted, matriculate, etc and drop after an academic year, i.e. two semesters? I assume that if anything this would make it more difficult, from an ‘ethical’ standpoint, to be admitted to a program in the future if I were to explain my reasoning for having dropped out, but I’m not sure if it would be that important.

In particular, it will be clear that I matriculated and dropped in order to preserve continuity with my previous studies (just completed). i.e., it will be obvious to a program that I apply to in the future that I do not intend to matriculate and drop again as I would do here.

To clarify, I would not be transferring to another school, but dropping out entirely and recommencing my degree from scratch at another time, likely at least a year after dropping, but with the additional courses in my transcript.

EDIT:
I should also clarify that this university does not offer a ‘non-degree’ program so that is not an option.