In case it varies between countries, by thesis committee I mean 2-4 professors who examine you on your MSc research after you submit your thesis, so except for your advisor, they are usually not familiar with your work prior to submission. Some of them might belong to other universities/departments and not be familiar with the student at all.

I am wondering whether such letters would be valuable. On the one hand, I feel they should be the next best thing after letters from people you’ve done research with, but on the other hand such letters can only refer to the quality of the outcome of your research and not your character.

What about letters from professors who have read your papers/thesis but haven’t met you in person and thus haven’t held a conversation regarding your research with you?

I want to apply to do my PhD at Melbourne University, where they require an honours degree with a “substantial research component equivalent to at least 25% of your final year.”

I’m about to finish with a first class honours (all A+), but my only research project is equivalent to 1/8th of my final year. I also will do a summer research project this December though.

Will I still have a chance at admission even though I fail to meet their minimum requirement? As far as grades and courses go I believe I’m a good candidate for the actual research area.

Currently my university is going through a transition where we have the option of changing from CSIT to CS. I am CSIT now with a concentration in Software Engineering and I plan on going to grad school (Phd or Masters) for human computer interaction; I am currently an undergrad. What would be the most appealing to an admissions officer. As of now I can see how CSIT may be more interesting to an employer if I were to go straight into the industry where business info tech is involved, but it may also come off as Computer Science ‘lite’ because it contains both disciplines.

I’ve just finished a conversation with a professor at University X. The majority of questions were on topics regarding the graduate admission. A quote that has both negative and confusing effects on me

It is almost impossible to get accepted normally. Aside from sending in all the required documents, passing the tests (GRE, IELTS), having a good GPA score, etc. the only chance to be admitted is to have ongoing, strong research and collaboration with the faculty.

However, the admission criteria states that only the particular set of documents is required. Can it be true that having no prior connections with the university makes me a less desirable candidate?

I’ve just finished a conversation with a professor at University X. The majority of questions were on topics regarding the graduate admission. A quote that has both negative and confusing effects on me

It is almost impossible to get accepted normally. Aside from sending in all the required documents, passing the tests (GRE, IELTS), having a good GPA score, etc. the only chance to be admitted is to have ongoing, strong research and collaboration with the faculty.

However, the admission criteria states that only the particular set of documents is required. Can it be true that having no prior connections with the university makes me a less desirable candidate?

During graduate studies online application submission period, is there any preference given for an applicant if he/she submits his application at the beginning of that period compared with someone who submits his/her application couple of hours before the deadline?

Or as long as the applications are complete there is absolutely no difference!

I’m applying for math PhD programs this year. I’m a junior at UCB, and I’ve taken standard grad math courses such as algebraic geometry in the last year. This year I’m taking grad seminars and topics courses, and the topics covered this semester include geometric rep theory, symplectic field theory, TQFT and microlocal sheaf theory. I have no time to do any meaningful research on them until the December, and I have no previous research experience. However, I’ll have given ten expository talks related to them since the last year until the end of this semester. I made a slide for one of them, but I have nothing to submit other than that, as I used blackboard in most talks.

To complement my lack of research experience, should I write an expository paper on a topic of my interest? Or is there anything else more effective for admission? I can write an expository paper within this semester, but I personally prefer studying recent topics to be up-to-date than writing such papers, which is often time-consuming.