I graduated from college with a BS in Civil Engineering a bit more than 10 years ago. My GPA was about 3.0, but I think that was pulled up more by some electives and liberals arts classes that I excelled in because I recall struggling a bit with some of the more advanced technical courses and walking away with an A+ in History of Rock and Roll I and II.

Since graduating, I’ve since tested for and passed the PE exam and am licensed to practice engineering in addition, I’ve since become a lot more proficient at advanced technical aspects of engineering via practice.

I’ve never before attempted an application to grad school, but more and more I’m finding professionally that there are a lot of advantages to having a broader knowledge in engineering than the narrow specialization that my BS prepared me with.

What are the typical steps I would need to complete in order to gain admission to grad school. Is it necessary to take the GRE? Would a GPA below 3.0 in technical courses pretty much bar me out?

I just finished my master’s degree and I want to do a PhD in a specific multidisciplinary field. So, I started searching for the professors who work in this research area. I worked as a research assistant in a lab in a lower rank school and I was working in the same research area that I was doing. So, I do have an experience with this field and I don’t have to start from scratch (I took this as an advantage for me over other students) Should I start contact professors directly so if they find me a suitable students they can support my application in those top universities (like Stanford, CalTech, UCSD, etc.)? or professors in those top universities already having the best students to choose from and they don’t bother themselves with recruiting from the outside? Another question, in those top universities, can professors get involved in the admission process or at the end it’s just about the admission people and no say for professors on the admission processes no matters that student is good?

This question already has an answer here:

I am applying for the Masters in the US for the Spring 2019 session. I don’t understand the concept of GPA.
I have done my masters in Physics. My doubts are as follows:
1. For my three-year undergrad degree in Physics do I need to calculate the score of the last year or all the three years (as in my country what you scored in the final year matters for admission)
2. My Master’s is calculated on a 7 point scale. Like my GPA is 4.33/7. How to convert this on 4 point scale?
3. I come from a lower middle-class family and applying to the US universities will come costly to me. So I wish to email shortlisted university for my profile evaluation. Will they help out? How do I approach them?

Is there any benefit of applying in October as opposed to late December right up against the deadline? Do committees just meet after the deadline once all reviews are in? This is what I thought, but I have heard from a few professors that they sometimes look at applications as they roll in, and so it may be advantageous to apply early because they could remember yours.

Edit: One thing that I would have to weigh applying early against is the fact that I work at a research org, so waiting an extra 8 weeks or so could allow a new publication to come out and add that to my CV, or I could get on a new project in that period which would be relevant and look good to the programs I’m applying to.

I am currently an American undergraduate student who is pursuing a B.S. in Mathematics. Upon graduation, I want to work in industry and pursue a masters degree at Indiana State University online. The degree is simply: M.S. in Mathematics.

The link is to that program is here.

I eventually would like to pursue a Ph.D in Mathematics (hopefully from Stevens Institute of Technology or Rutgers).

Since there is an in person version of this degree, my question is, wold a university be able to tell that I received my degree from doing the work online? The classes are the same I believe, and seemingly up to par with other masters programs in terms of courses.

Would there be any indication that the degree was completed online, or would I receive the same diploma? Accordingly, would an institution like Rutgers or Stevens Institute of Technology know that I pursued my degree online? Is there a marking on transcripts or diplomas that makes note of this? Are programs less likely to admit students who received degrees online (regionally accredited, of course) than traditional residential programs?

I would appreciate different insights from all, but am especially interested in responses from those who have received degrees from completing work online from regionally accredited universities with decent rapport within the academic community.

Without naming the university (to protect my privacy), I attended one of the top 20 universities in the US for my undergrad and graduated in 3 years with honors. While graduating from this school in 3 years isn’t impossible, it’s certainly rare. On top of that, I have a good GPA and finished a humanities-based CogNeuro major, a Writing minor, and all my pre-med coursework.

Now I’m applying to grad school for CogNeuro, and I’d like to highlight the fact that I graduated in 3 years on my CV, for 2 reasons. First, I genuinely think my accomplishments are made more impressive by that fact. And second, because it explains why I have less research experience than some of my peers. So I guess my question is twofold: Should I even bother mentioning that I graduated early, or am I just being arrogant in doing so? And if that’s a good thing to mention, how can I do so without being heavy-handed?

Currently I have my high school name and graduation year listed under my “Education” section, not because my high school matters, but because it’s the only way I can think of to show that I graduated from college early.

I recently applied to a graduate engineering program at a university and was contacted by a professor who was interested in my application. We discussed the projects that he is undertaking and seems to think I would be a good addition to the team. A week after the interview, he reached out stating that he has instructed the university to offer me the MASc position in the program I was applying for, and discussed the courses he would be interested in having me taking and the total funding he is willing to provide for the program. I replied back stating that I would love to join his team.

My concern so far is that I have not received an official letter of admission from the university and I am not sure if it is practical or ethical to apply to other universities in the meantime in order to ensure that if things won’t work out I have a backup plan.

My question: is this the right thing to do or should I wait for the decision to arrive from the main university I applied to?

I recently applied to a graduate engineering program at a university and was contacted by a professor who was interested in my application. We discussed the projects that he is undertaking and seems to think I would be a good addition to the team. A week after the interview, he reached out stating that he has instructed the university to offer me the MASc position in the program I was applying for, and discussed the courses he would be interested in having me taking and the total funding he is willing to provide for the program. I replied back stating that I would love to join his team.

My concern so far is that I have not received an official letter of admission from the university and I am not sure if it is practical or ethical to apply to other universities in the meantime in order to ensure that if things won’t work out I have a backup plan.

My question: is this the right thing to do or should I wait for the decision to arrive from the main university I applied to?

I am going to take the GRE soon. My practice tests end up being at V: 158 (80%) and Q: 162 (80%). I didn’t care too much about the quantitative section in the practice test so my real score should be higher. However, my Verbal seems accurate. I don’t know about the writing, but I’d guess to around a 5 if things go well.

Question: Are these scores good enough for a PhD in electrical/computer engineering or computer science (not decided yet, something in EECS) at schools like MIT/Stanford/Berkeley? Should I be wasting my time preparing for the GRE? I had thought that GRE was completely useless, but after some searching online it seems it actually carries weight.