I am a French citizen who is interested in a PhD in the US, Canada or Australia, in the field of geography, water management and protection, environmental problematics, land management…

But it seems really hard to find PhD offers, especially when you are a foreigner. I wonder if this is because we are in a bad period, where most of the offers are closed at the beginning of the year?

I get the feeling that most PhD candidates are recruited internally. Any advice is welcome.

I am writing here in hopes of obtaining good recommendations. I obtained a BSc in honors astrophysics in 2016 and after a lot of soul searching, came to realize that my real passion lies in the philosophical foundations of physics. My plan is to obtain a Masters in the philosophy of physics before moving on to a PhD in the theoretical foundations of physics. I already applied to the MSt program offered by Oxford and have two more choices I am currently applying for as well, but I have been told that I should apply to ~6-7 universities to be on the safe side.

These are the programs I am applying to so far:

  • MSt in Philosophy of Physics, Oxford University
  • MA in Philosophy of Physics, University of Bristol
  • MA in Logic and Philosophy of Science, Ludwig-Maximillian Universitat

I would very much appreciate it if somebody here could point me to similar programs. Because my end-goal is to go into theoretical physics proper, I am looking for a Masters program with a strong emphasis on the mathematical foundations of physics. This means that I am considering programs that don’t have the words “philosophy of physics” explicitly in their title provided that the faculty is strong enough in mathematics or physics. I am particularly enthused by the “mathematical philosophy” approach of the group at LMU and would like to learn about similar programs.

I am not interested in applying to institutions in the U.S, so I am placing most of my emphasis in UK, German, or other European institutions. Thanks a lot for your help!

I am a French citizen who is interested in a PhD in the US, Canada or Australia, in the field of geography, water management and protection, environmental problematics, land management…

But it seems really hard to find PhD offers, especially when you are a foreigner. I wonder if this is because we are in a bad period, where most of the offers are closed at the beginning of the year?

I get the feeling that most PhD candidates are recruited internally. Any advice is welcome.

I am interested in topic X, and I would like to find a supervisor for that topic. At one particular uni, there are quite a few people interested in my topic, and I need to find out who might be a fit and whose interests are maybe not so aligned with mine.

Should I just message all of these people at the same department? Would it potentially reflect bad on me? I am also worried that in case two of these people are interested, I am facing a dilemma when applying.

How should I proceed, how do these things usually work?

I admitted to a master degree program in Canada. I have applied for the visa. I have been waiting for 2.5 months now.
I lost the winter semester. what should I write to visa section? how can I ask them to speed up the process? spring semester is my last chance to get there if I get the visa late, I will lose my acceptance completely. 🙁
My question is about writing a letter and letter samples.

should I apply to other universities now? to prevent wasting time?

I cheated at a language exam when I was eight years old. I finished early and noticed that I had accidentally left a dictionary in my drawer. I double-checked my answers and promptly got caught.
The incident is probably unverifiable at this point: The physical evidence is long gone; the teacher probably retired; the school probably didn’t keep records or has already destroyed it. I might be the only person on the planet who still remembers it.

  • Should I mention this incident when being asked about academic integrity in job interviews or similar?

  • Should I tell graduate admissions?

I suspect the answer is no since it was so long ago and I was eight years old, but I’m afraid I might be rationalizing.

I’m about to write a statement of purpose for graduate admission and my advisor passed along to me the following pieces of advice to keep in mind while writing (based on his style and experience in admission commitees).

I completely agree with every point he has made. However, I’d like to have further insight and suggestions and yet another reality check on the soundness of these pieces of advice.

Advice from my advisor:

  • Don’t try to sell me my own research area by explaining to me how fascinating it is. Do show your interest by showcasing your previous
    experience working on (or studying) related topics (not necessarily
    very closely related).

  • Don’t tell me how amazing, prestigious, perfect my institution or research group is. I know more than you do about that. Also, chances
    are that you are applying to a lot of schools and don’t have
    inflexible interests yet, which is fine. Just tell me that you may be
    willing to work with a certain research group that seems more or less
    in line with your previous experience or future directions.

  • Don’t tell me a cute story about how you fell in love with my field when you were a kid (or high school senior or college freshmen). I
    just don’t care. I want to hire a soon-to-be professional to join my
    research group, not a little boy with a cute story. I only need to
    know factual information that show your commitment to the field (for
    example, courses/conferences attended, projects undertaken).

  • Ban ill-crafted, pseudo-literary, flowery, cheesy narrations. Just write facts. Straightforwardly. Succintly. Accurately. I’ll draw conclusions for myself.

  • Ban any buzzwords, meaningless adjectives and adverbs. If they don’t add concrete information, but are there just an ill-advised attempt
    to impress, cut them!