This question pertains to math graduate programs in the US. Suppose a school sent a financial offer (TAship) to a student A and put a student B on the waitlist in the event that A declines the offer. Student A then declined the offer by signing the letter, so the school sent the offer to B.

My question: is it possible that the school will rescind the offer from B if A changed his/her mind later on and decided the take the offer given that

i) B has not yet accepted the offer.

ii) B has already accepted the offer.

iii) The date that A signed the letter to decline was before April 15th.

this may seem like a silly question, as I know every institute is different. However, I was wondering how likely is acceptance to a PhD program when you have a supervisor on your side?
Background: I am applying for an incredible PhD in Ireland. I have very interested supervisors, who loved my proposal and I had two very promising meetings with them, one via Skype and one face to face. They offered me a desk and a new lab to set up, but they informed me it’s now down to the academic council. They informed me it’s a formality and there is a high chance of acceptance unless something dramatic happens.
I will add I do have a weak undergraduate degree, but a strong masters which resulted in a publication. I also have worked as a lab technician in Italy and London so have a good bit of experience outside academia.
I may be overthinking a bit as I am waiting for feedback from the college, and starting to feel the nerves.

I am applying for a Masters degree. An IELTS with an overall Band score of at least 6.5 and a minimum of 6.0 for each section is required. I have taken the test and my overall score is 7 but in particular my score is:

Listening: 8.5
Reading: 7.5
Writing: 7.0
Speaking: 5.5

  1. Would an application with the aforementioned results get rejected before it even reaches the academic evaluation stage?
  2. Would an Enquiry on Results (apply for my speaking to be remarked) help?
  3. Is retaking the test the best option?

During my masters degree, I was a teaching assistant for undergraduate course ‘X’ two times. The professors in charge of the course are titled ‘Senior Lecturer’ – they are not research faculty.

How would my PhD application look if I had a recommendation letter from one of them?

Bear in mind:

  • I have worked extensively with them: meetings, created lecture content, handled student issues, etc.
  • I have two other LoR’s from research faculty.
  • The other options I have (for my third LoR) are: Undergraduate faculty (from a different country) or graduate faculty who’s courses I took, but did not interact very significantly.

Thanks!

Recently I applied to a number of graduate program in the humanities. After applying to ten schools, I received an offer in late February for a full funding package, from one of the universities, which seemed rather early to me. This offer came from an advisor, not the actual graduate school – the official letter of acceptance from the graduate school came several weeks later. In the offer, the advisor stated that though I had been offered funding, they would appreciate an answer on whether I would accept the funding as soon as possible. Since this was late February, and I had only heard back from one school at the time, this put me in tricky situation, and I couldn’t really give her a deliberate answer. I would certainly accept the funding if I chose to attend, but that was not a certainty by any means. The school from which I received the offer was not my top choice, a good school, but not a top choice. As such, I told her I needed more time, without going into any details. Quite simply though, I just hadn’t heard back from most of my schools.

A couple of weeks later I heard back from this same advisor, and this time she again asked for an answer as soon as possible, but did notify me that the national deadline in which a decision can be made is April 15th, several weeks away. At this time, I was still waiting to receive a decision from a couple of other schools. I told her (the advisor that contacted me) that I needed more time. One to two weeks went by, and trying to expedite the decision, I contacted the one last school that I hadn’t heard from, and found out I had been placed on the waiting list. My waitlisted school said they needed to receive word from a couple of other students whom they had made offers to, and they could then possibly make an offer to me if these students declined. As such, after thinking myself into a rabbit hole with these complications, rashly, despite having thought of it for several weeks (which may be why I thought myself into a rabbit hole) I accepted the offer from the initial school that made the offer.

I have read elsewhere on these boards that accepting an offer and then withdrawing it after April 15th, for a waitlisted school is highly unethical and can cause dismissal from all schools. I certainly see the reasoning behind that, but if I were to rescind my acceptance before April 15th, hopefully a week or more, would this be considered unethical since they could still easily give the funding elsewhere? Moroever, would it be a disadvantage to the school I did receive the offer from? Finally, could it possibly have an effect on my long-term career if I rescinded the offer and accepted admission to the waitlisted school? Another question, which seems to be a personal one depending on who is replying: I have seen some people say that programs reaching out like this early isn’t necessarily right because they are applying pressure on a student earlier than maybe they should? I have also heard other people on these threads make strong points that these universities need to hear back as soon as they can so other students aren’t caught in a similar limbo as the the one I am in now. So I guess if anyone has to offer on this point, please feel free to do so. I did feel pressured because it was so early and I had received so few responses, but I also understand what the university is trying to do.

Regardless, is it ethical to rescind an acceptance of funding and admission before April 15th (hopefully a week or more before)? Would this burn a serious bridge that would hurt my career? Would another student not receive funding since I accepted the offer and then withdrew it? I understand that some programs will reach out to their highly-regarded candidates in order to recruit them, and I’m certainly not against the school, but it sounds like I have a solid chance of getting off of the waitlist. It was one of my top schools, for not just academic reasons but personal as well. Seeing how this is the next five years of my life, it’s a weighty decision to make. Please let me know what you think, or if you have any official procedures for going about these matters. Thanks!

Recently I applied to a number of graduate program in the humanities. After applying to all of my schools, I received an offer in late February for a full funding package, which seemed very early to me. This offer came from an advisor, not the actual graduate school. The official letter of acceptance from the graduate school came several weeks later. In the offer, the advisor stated that though I had been offered funding, they would appreciate an answer on whether I would accept the funding or not as soon as possible.

Since this was late February, and I had only heard back from one school at the time, this put me in tricky situation, and I couldn’t really tell her anything. I would certainly accept the funding if I chose to attend, but that was not for sure by any means. The school I received the offer from was not my top choice, not a bad school by any means, but not a top choice. As such, I told her I needed time, without going into any details. Quite simply though, I just hadn’t heard back from most of my schools. A couple of weeks later I heard back from this same advisor, and this time she again asked for an answer soon if possible, but did notify me that the national deadline that a decision can be made is April 15th, still several weeks away. I was still waiting to hear back on a couple of other schools. I told her (the advisor that contacted me) that I needed more time.

One to two weeks went by and trying to expedite the decision, I contacted the one last top school that I hadn’t heard from, and found out I had been placed on the waiting list. My waitlisted school said they just needed to hear back from a couple of other students whom they had made offers to, and they could then possibly make an offer to me if these students declined. As such, after thinking myself into a rabbit hole with these complications of matters, rashly, despite having thought of it for several weeks (which may be why I thought myself into a rabbit hole) I accepted the offer from the initial school that made the offer. I have read elsewhere on these boards that accepting an offer and then withdrawing from it after April 15th, for a waitlisted school is highly unethical, can cause withdrawal from all schools, and I certainly see the reasoning behind that, but if I were to rescind my acceptance before April 15th, hopefully a week or more, would this be considered unethical since they could still easily give the funding elsewhere?

Moreover, would it disadvantage the school I did receive the offer from? Finally, could it possibly have an effect on my long-term career if I rescinded the offer and accepted admission to the waitlisted school? To be frank, I’ve been trying not to second-guess the decision and take responsibility for the decision I made, but as I’ve thought more and more about it, I don’t exactly feel like it was fair to place that pressure on me so early in the decision process. They have to know that I probably haven’t heard back from other schools, that I’m not in a position to make an informed decision, and that it is unorthodox to personally reach out to student who is trying to make the best decision for him/herself as they can. Of course, I did accept the offer, so I clearly need to blame myself as well. Regardless, is it ethical to rescind an acceptance of funding and admission before April 15th (hopefully a week or more before)?

In your opinion, is it right of them to use this tactic in trying to get an early decision? Would this burn a serious bridge that would hurt my career? Would another student not receive funding since I accepted the offer and then went back on it? I understand that some programs will reach out to their highly-regarded candidates in order to recruit them, and I am flattered by it, and I’m certainly not against the school, but it sounds like I have a solid chance of getting off of that waitlist, and that was one of my top schools. Seeing how this is the next five years of my life, it’s a weighty decision to make. Please let me know what you think, or if you have any official procedures for going about these matters.

Recently I have finished my Masters. My relation with my thesis supervisor is very bad. He is a professor. I am very disappointed with his mentoring. He is very lazy and always kept himself busy in works except researching. I expressed my dissatisfaction toward him directly. That makes him furious on me. I have planned to pursue my Masters degree from university in North America region. Three reference letter are required. I don’t want my thesis supervisor as a referee. Other faculty members in our department are agree to refer me. But will it affect negatively in the admission procedure if I don’t submit any reference letter from my thesis supervisor?

I have a predicament. I am about 4 weeks shy of graduating from a small Virginia (USA) school with a BA in English literature and I received a D in an upper-level research class in linguistics, which I do not intend to study in the future. I want to apply to a graduate program for English lit in the future, and I am otherwise qualified (otherwise great grades/GPA, great test scores and letters of recommendation, four conference presentations, and a highly prestigious award for an undergraduate research paper in literature). I am very nervous that this class will kill my chances of getting into a good masters/PhD program. I plan to explain that the class was in linguistics, which was very far out of my comfort zone and I had very little prior knowledge of the subject or research methods required to succeed in this class. I felt like my professor expected more from me than I was capable of because I won awards for my research in literature, and she assured me that I would be qualified to perform this research without realizing that my research had been exclusively literary until that point and that I would need extra help to succeed (which she was never willing to provide despite me practically begging for help). Do you think this situation would kill my chances of getting into a good school? Or do you think they would be willing to overlook the abnormal grade since it was not part of my area of study?

It might also be important to note that I failed a literature class and retook it and earned a B+. The “F” is still visible on my transcript but doesn’t factor into my GPA. I received the grade because I could not turn in my final paper due to a one-time extenuating circumstance, but my performance was excellent in that course until that point.

This is a super long and complicated question, but I’m taking a gap year to figure myself out and gain professional experience, so I’m not looking at any urgent upcoming deadlines. I just don’t want to set myself up for failure by applying to schools that wouldn’t give me a chance. I’m more than willing to go into an MA program at a smaller school to work hard and prove myself to a big shot university. I just don’t really know what to do and professors at my school are not being up front with me about my situation because they don’t have the full story. Everyone I work with says I have a great chance, but I am having doubts.

I am a prospective PhD math student. This year’s application season has brought me down to two schools to choose from:

  1. Medium-sized department, ranked <80 on US News (whatever that means), very welcoming people, potential advisor is very young but seemed like we would “click”, surrounding area and city is beautiful, program looks awesome.

  2. Larger department, top 20 program, potential advisor is famous in his field, current advisor says I would work well with him/he’s a cool guy, don’t know much else since I’ve not visited.

I am waitlisted at university 2. University 1’s initial offer to me included the standard stipend along with a decent fellowship. I made a visit to university 1 and talked with many professors and my potential advisor. After this visit, they offered me a ~17% increase in my stipend due to some professors advocating for me who were apparently impressed (whom I do not know other than my visit). I feel that this is a good sign, but I am ultimately pursuing a career in academia. So I know prestige plays a big roll in future jobs. Assuming I have an offer from university 2 as well:

Questions:

  1. Is this late stipend increase offer typical?

  2. Based on your experience and insight in the job market for academics, which university is the better option?

Thanks for your time to read.