I’m posting on here becuase I’m at the beginning of my junior year of college and starting to have to more seriously consider my post-grad options. I love math and computer science, have taken a lot of challenging/interesting courses, am looking into starting to do some research with a professor, and starting to wonder whether I have a shot of getting into a respectable PhD program for either math or computer science (~top 40 school or better if possible).

Also, I’m would love to hear any suggestions you have of either

i). things I could do to improve my chances of admission. I will say, my biggest weakness is my GPA–I’ve enjoyed my time in college to the detriment of my grades at times.

ii.) good schools (outside of the obvious top 5-10) to consider

I appreciate your feedback! Some details below..

College: Dartmouth

Overall GPA 3.51 avg for college 3.438

Math Courswork: (GPA 3.13 avg for Math Majors 3.34)
Multivariable Calc, Probability, Linear Algebra, Probability and Statistical Inference, Functions of a Complex Variable, Topology, Real Analysis, Algebra, Measure Theory and Complex Analysis.

CS Coursework: (GPA: 3.62 avg for CS Majors 3.61)
Algorithms, Software Design and Implementation, Computer Architecture, Operating Systems, Computational Tools for Applied Science, Machine Learning, AI, Rendering Algorithms

In terms of experiences, I’ve helped build a tool to do cross linguistic analysis of classical texts for the Classics Department at my school and I just got finished interning for the summer at a tech startup doing some software dev work for them.

I have starting pursuing PhD in one of the universities in India. I was really interested in the subject but after joining PhD i realised that research is not for me. I like reading about the topics of my liking but not research. I feel frustated and wants to go back to school teaching. Above all I am from natural sciences background and pursuing PhD in International relations. What can be the best way to deal with the situation?

I have recently enrolled in M.Phil./PhD program in international Relations after leaving my high school teaching job. I was fascinated and interested in the field but after joining and attending classes for nearly a month, I have realised that I am not interested in research. I find the program monotonous, boring and at times frustrating. Though stipend is not an issue but it’s too less, approx $80/month.

I think reading about something passionately and researching about it are two different things. I miss my school teaching tremendously. I am in dilemma now. Should I continue with it and at least earn MPhil degree or leave it and again enter school teaching which I like.

From spending time here on Academia SE, I know that many researchers think that it’s wise to keep their work closely guarded, at least until it gets published or put on the ArXiv.

Does the same advice generally apply to someone who’s making progress on a masters thesis; of course, this is not at a professional level of research, but perhaps the thesis could turn out to be publishable or just…better-than-expected (but not publishable). Should a masters student also aim to keep his thesis work closely guarded and only talk about the research question with his advisor, until the work is completed?

Part of me feels that doing this kind of abandons relationships with other masters students, but I also don’t want to regret oversharing too early. What do you think?

Thanks,

I have not been a very good student while attending college. Whenever attendance was not mandatory I would probably miss class. My grades were a lot better than people attending every day but it has been cases I attended only few times a class over the entire semester. But my GPA has been 3.8 and did a double major (Both were science majors, 20 credits a semester, in a reputable school).

However, whenever I attended class I always tried to participate and made my voice heard, the professors knew who I was. I went to office hours and was respectful of them. But I am sure that all of them don’t think high of me, in terms of achieving a master’s degree. I also have high ambitions and I am applying for an ivy league school.

The problem is that I did not act in a very professional manner towards them. I had many personal issues and was still discovering myself at the time, but this is all excuses nobody will understand.

The recommendation letters seem to be one of the most important aspects of the application.

  1. First of, how will I manage to ask a professor to write a recommendation letter for 5 colleges I am intending to apply to?
  2. Does it make a difference for the professor what school I am
    applying to (ivy league or not)?

  3. What criteria should I use when picking the professors that will write a good recommendation?

  4. I live in a different country at the moment. Should I go and meet them in person to ask for this?

  5. I burned a few bridges, but how can I influence their opinion at this point and show them how much I have grown after college and how
    much better I have become and it is partially thanks to them?

I am really scared of asking them. Any tips or advice is greatly appreciated it.

I am in search of database of world universities like hotcoursesabroad.com

I have searched much on internet but didn’t find any API or database from where i cna fetch data of universities of UK, USA, CAN, AUS, NZ, Eurpoe.

There are few websites provide list of universities i mean Names but i didn’t find any one database to get the list of courses offered by universities with their fee/cost and intakes (summer/winter/spring)

I will be grateful if anybody can guide me on this matter.

I plan on attending office hours this week for a PhD class (in math, to be specific). This would be at a U.S. university, at a strong math department.

My question is: are the expectations different from undergraduate (and masters) class office hours, when the time is mostly spent on HW questions?

If you’re a professor for PhD courses, what do you expect to talk about with your PhD students during office hours, if you indeed have different expectations and rather not discuss homework?

I plan on attending office hours this week for a PhD class (in math, to be specific). This would be at a U.S. university, at a strong math department.

My question is: are the expectations different from undergraduate (and masters) class office hours, when the time is mostly spent on HW questions?

If you’re a professor for PhD courses, what do you expect to talk about with your PhD students during office hours, if you indeed have different expectations for your PhD classes office hours and rather not discuss homework?

I’ve just finished a conversation with a professor at University X. The majority of questions were on topics regarding the graduate admission. A quote that has both negative and confusing effects on me

It is almost impossible to get accepted normally. Aside from sending in all the required documents, passing the tests (GRE, IELTS), having a good GPA score, etc. the only chance to be admitted is to have ongoing, strong research and collaboration with the faculty.

However, the admission criteria states that only the particular set of documents is required. Can it be true that having no prior connections with the university makes me a less desirable candidate?

I’ve just finished a conversation with a professor at University X. The majority of questions were on topics regarding the graduate admission. A quote that has both negative and confusing effects on me

It is almost impossible to get accepted normally. Aside from sending in all the required documents, passing the tests (GRE, IELTS), having a good GPA score, etc. the only chance to be admitted is to have ongoing, strong research and collaboration with the faculty.

However, the admission criteria states that only the particular set of documents is required. Can it be true that having no prior connections with the university makes me a less desirable candidate?