I am an international student from Egypt applying this cycle to PhD programs in the US. I have majored in Physics and minored in math at the American University in Cairo, the best school in the country. My major GPA is 3.82 and I have a cumulative of 3.72. I had a summer opportunity at Harvard, and I have done research at my school. No publications! I haven’t done as expected in the Physics GRE; I scored 630.

There are schools where GRE is optional like Harvard Astronomy. In such a case, is it better to send a lower score than no score at all?

Universities in European Union countries have the possibility of issuing a PhD degree that is certified as “doctor europaeus” if the PhD student fulfills a certain list of 4 requirements, although this university reports a slightly different list of requirements.

Regardless of the requirements, is there any advantage of having such certification? I am referring to practical advantages, for example a certified degree can be accepted in other EU countries with less bureaucracy. And career advantages (for example more prestige or points gained in postdoc grant applications).

I am an international student and I have already a bachelor degree and want to apply for a second one in the United States. Three of the universities I am interested in, use the common application and they require a recommendation letter from a teacher. Should my recommendations be from professors or my old high school teachers?

I’ve completed my Masters in Computer Science in India. Here we’ve had no specialization as such and the subjects assigned have been as per University rules. Now I feel the need to specialize in my area of interest and have found Universities in the US that will allow me to choose subjects that align with my interests. Am I eligible for applying to said universities?

Note – These subjects are still in the Computer Science department in these Universities 🙁

Will the fact that they’re in a different country be the exception wherein pursuing a second Masters isn’t a problem?

I am a young postdoc at a large crowded university in the USA. Also, I am not from the USA, so my school experience has been very different from the high school experience of my students.

Since I am teaching mathematics classes, I wonder whether there is a good and comprehensible summary the American students have seen in their high school mathematics classes.

Given the fractured education system in the USA, good and comprehensible may be mutually exclusive, but the question is worth a try.

While the Nobel laureates are announced each year, are there any online resources that list who was nominated?

In particular, I am asking the Academic side of Nobel prizes, especially in Chemistry, Economics, Literature, Physics, or Physiology-Medicine.

For example, Wikipedia says that Kazuhiko Nishijima (西島 和彦) was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1960 and 1961, but it is not clear where can we find the official/secondary information about other “short-list” nominees.

When the Nobel prizes are announced, we can find the names of Nobel prize recipients/laureate. Are there online resources that we can find the list of people who are nominated as strong candidates for Nobel prizes, even though he/she may not win the prize in the end?

In particular, I am asking the Academic side of Nobel prizes, especially in the Chemistry, Economics, Literature, Physics, or Physiology-Medicine.

For example, it is said that Kazuhiko Nishijima 西島 和彦 is nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1960 and 1961 in Wikipedia, but it is not clear where can we find the official/secondary information about the nominees who are strong candidates.

Background: I was born and raised in the United Kingdom and have a number of GCSEs and A-Levels. I am now living in the United States (by marriage/green card), and am looking to apply for jobs. Some of the jobs that have just caught my eye was Tutoring either Writing or Study Skills, at a community college. One job has the following requirement:

Documented two-year degree from a regionally accredited institution or its equivalent (junior level status at a college or university)

So, I am wondering, could my A-levels could be considered the equivalent of a US Associates degree?. I realise this is somewhat ambitious (especially as I only have two A-levels and a one-year BTEC roughly equivalent to an AS; but I do have other educational work experience)

I am aware there is no official rulebook for equivalency, the US Department of Education states it (source), but I am hoping there may be some unofficial but persuasive equivalency out there – like an agreement made by all the Russell Group universities or their US equivalent, or a court case, or something else quite decisive.

A summary of my reasoning and research so far is as follows:

Arguments For A-Level = Associates

  • The University of Michigan will accept Freshmen who only have 5 GCSE’s (source), putting the beginning of A-levels on par with beginning a Bachelor’s as a Freshman. (However they add that “IF A-levels are being taken”, give predicted grades…)

Arguments For A-Level = High School

  • A-Levels are completed at 18 years old, the same as the US High School Diploma

Arguments For A-Level = Something In Between High School and Associate’s

  • UCAS in 2013 listed the US High School Diploma as being equivalent to GCSEs, but gives UCAS points for US Advanced Placement Tests anywhere between 20 and 120 points (on the old UCAs system, 120 was one A-level at A grade, source), without giving points for Associate Degrees (presumably because they are too high?) (source from University of the Arts, London)

  • Various students have stated that their institutes have treated A-Levels as being equivalent to US Advanced Placement courses (anecdotal sources)

  • Chavagnes Private School (UK) states without source that UCAS treat AP as A-level; and also mention that a student with A-levels could expect to find themselves discounted for some of the first year’s work of a ‘university’. (source)

  • A US Associate’s Degree is listed as being equivalent to a UK HNC, that is, equivalent to the first year of a UK Bachelor’s Degree. (source from an e-learning provider) That is, above A-levels, but not by much.

I have asked my American wife, who completed two AP’s while in high school, what the different grades and groups for the Advanced Placements, given in the UCAS document, actually mean, and she doesn’t know.

If there is any more evidence I can use in addition to the above fragments, especially statements by a university like my one from Michigan, I would be very grateful for them to be provided.

I am awaiting my evaluation of my degree by the KMK (Kultusministerkonferenz). I paid the 200 Euro fee a month ago and am still waiting for a response. It is mentioned on their website that it takes three months for processing. Does anyone have any experience with this? Will it really take that long? And what is the probability of failing the evaluation? What are the criteria that they look into? Any help would be much appreciated.

I am awaiting my evaluation of my degree by the KMK (Kultusministerkonferenz). I paid the 200 Euro fee a month ago and am still waiting for a response. It is mentioned on their website that it takes three months for processing. Does anyone have any experience with this? Will it really take that long? And what is the probability of failing the evaluation? What are the criteria that they look into? Any help would be much appreciated.