As they do every year, my department is running multiple searches for faculty hires. After all the talks for a given position, the committee solicits feedback on the job candidates.

When submitting feedback on job candidates to a committee is it best to say good things about the candidates you liked and stay silent on the ones you didn’t like? Or should I submit comments with both the good and the bad?

Ex. 1 — Just positive: “Candidate A’s talk was impressive in the ways that it does x, y, z. Their work is great….etc.” The letter ends there, and I do not mention anything negative about Candidate B

Ex. 2 — Positive and negative: “Candidate A’s talk was impressive in the ways that it does x, y, z. Their work is great….etc. I was less enthusiastic about Candidate B’s talk. I found the theory and empirics a bit fuzzy…etc.

The people on the committee are my peers and will assess me in the future through reference letters, tenure letters, informal channels, etc. I am not sure what professional etiquette is for feedback on potential hires, and how negative comments will reflect on the writer.

Note: I am a PhD candidate in political science, although I hope that this questions is relevant to grad students and faculty.

Not so long ago an Austrian institution posted a job ad titled “Assistant Professor Position (Tenure Track) for a female Researcher”. The description says further

As part of a special measure towards increasing female employment in scientific positions and promoting young researchers, the Faculty of [censored department] at the [censored institution name] invites applications for an Assistant Professor position (tenure track) for women expected to begin on May 2, 2018.

My understanding is that it is unlawful to ask for a particular gender in a job ad unless the gender is strictly necessary to perform the job duties. For academic tasks, the gender of the researcher is irrelevant. Does the institution run into legal issues with this ad? Could someone legally generate profit from such an ad by suing the institution (or the goverment behind it) for discrimination? Have such attempts been already undertaken in academia? (Outside academia, we see successful lawsuits at least in Germany.) An aside: I’m not asking whether the job ad and the institution should be condemned or not, but I’m wishing to know more about the legal&financial part of the story.

Not so long ago an Austrian institution posted a job ad titled “Assistant Professor Position (Tenure Track) for a female Researcher”. The description says further

As part of a special measure towards increasing female employment in scientific positions and promoting young researchers, the Faculty of [censored department] at the [censored institution name] invites applications for an Assistant Professor position (tenure track) for women expected to begin on May 2, 2018.

My understanding is that it is unlawful to ask for a particular gender in a job ad unless the gender is strictly necessary to perform the job duties. For academic tasks, the gender of the researcher is irrelevant. Does the institution run into legal issues with this ad? Could someone legally generate profit from such an ad by suing the institution (or the goverment behind it) for discrimination? Have such attempts been already undertaken in academia? (Outside academia, we see successful lawsuits at least in Germany.) An aside: I’m not asking whether the job ad and the institution should be condemned or not, but I’m wishing to know more about the legal&financial part of the story.

Not so long ago an Austrian institution posted a job ad titled “Assistant Professor Position (Tenure Track) for a female Researcher”. The description says further

As part of a special measure towards increasing female employment in scientific positions and promoting young researchers, the Faculty of [censored department] at the [censored institution name] invites applications for an Assistant Professor position (tenure track) for women expected to begin on May 2, 2018.

My understanding is that it is unlawful to mention the gender unless a particuar gender is strictly necessary to perform job duties. For academic tasks, the gender is irrelevant. Does the institution run into legal issues with this ad? Could someone legally generate profit from such an ad by suing the institution for discrimination? Have such attempts been already undertaken in academia?

I have applied to a postdoc position in aerospace at a US school. The advertisement was posted in May’17 and review of applications began in October’17 and will continue until the position is filled. Until November end, I hadn’t heard from anybody and my online application status was “in applicant pool.” So I sent an email to an administration person to check if my application is still under consideration or a final selection has already been made. I got a reply saying that applications are still being considered (not specifically confirming or ruling out MY particular application).

This is a very good project. I find it hard to believe that the PI hasn’t still found the perfect fit. I am also wondering where do I stand? Am I still in the running?

If any body has any ideas as to what to make of this situation, please do share.

I came across an advertisement for a postdoc position at a US school. While I have a PhD from a (different) US school, currently I am in India (my home country). I had contacted the PI to check with her to see if visa support is available for this position. She replied saying that she will support my visa if the fit is right. She also gave me a small problem to work on and asked me to return my solutions in a week. I did. It’s been two weeks since and I haven’t heard anything back.

While I realize that there could be any number of reasons for not replying (such as she’s busy, or no longer interested or waiting for more people to apply), a simple reply confirming the receipt of my solutions would help.

If anybody has any ideas as to what to make of this situation, please do share.

I’m planning to finish my PhD in Educational Psychology in the next 1 – 1.5 years or so and thinking about future job prospects. I’m not positive that I’d like to pursue the traditional tenure-track faculty job at a research university, but I’m considering looking for postdoctoral researcher positions. Will admitting that I’m not sure I want to ever be a PI or tenure-track faculty hurt my chances of getting a postdoc position? Do people hire PIs partially because they are hoping to train up prestigious colleagues who they can continue to work with? Or will I be just as likely to get hired if I admit that I might prefer pursuing lab manager and research coordinator positions in the future?

I have heard that while recruiting in faculty member positions people look at the career of the applicants very critically and if someone has a year without a paper might face difficulties in getting permanent positions. I was wondering how important the issue really is in the context of securing permanent teaching/research positions.

Edit : I am asking this as a theoretical high energy physics postdoc.

I am interested in pursuing a particular program and I find the name of some of the past students from professor’s website.
Is it odd to write an email to these past graduate students and ask about the job and their future career?
could you please tell me what should I write to be natural?
I am particularly worried about finding the job and future career.