When looking at adverts for postdoc positions, I often see examples from the US that say something like “the position is for one year, with the possibility of extension for another 1-2 years”.

Literally, and contractually, the meaning of this is obvious, but I am interested in guidance as to whether it consistently means anything in practice.

For example, I can imagine that it could mean “I only have funding for one year, and I’m hoping the successful applicant will find themselves funding to stay longer”. But I can equally imagine that it is “I have funding for three years of a postdoc, but I want to see if I like them before committing”.

Is there a “usual” subtext? Or is it not possible to read anything into this?

When considering an intercontinental relocation, it would be helpful to have some idea of how likely the longer duration is!

It’s in a scientific field, in case that’s relevant.

I’m coming off of a 1 year visiting position. I’d like to focus more on teaching than research, but to still keep research active if possible.

Two positions open to me are a 1 year VAP (possible 2 year) at a liberal arts school or a lecturer at a large public school. Both are similarly ranked in their respective categories (~top 40).

The lecturer position is essentially a permanent position, but there is a higher teaching load and not much room for research. I have to admit however that I don’t want to be on the market forever, and given the cost of living there I think I could still be comfortable. Additionally, even without research I imagine it would be helpful for teaching-oriented positions if went back on the market. On the other hand, I have the impression that the nature of the VAP, (2/2 or 2/3 load, with research potential) would be better looking for more blended potential tenure-track positions.

I know the decision is mine based on what’s best for my particular needs (for example, the VAP is much closer to family) but objectively for a career trajectory, does one make more sense than the other? Just trying to get ideas at this stage. Any similar experiences, anecdotes, cautionary tales etc. would be helpful!

I am looking around to land on a tenure track position in the area of systems and control (engineering) and I would be grateful if anyone can suggest a good strategy to identify possible opportunities. I keep seeing people around me getting interviews for positions I have never heard of, so I guess my search strategy needs some improvements.

My main target is the US, but I am open to positions in UK or Canada as well.

I am looking around to land on a tenure track position in the area of systems and control (engineering) and I would be grateful if anyone can suggest a good strategy to identify possible opportunities. I keep seeing people around me getting interviews for positions I have never heard of, so I guess my search strategy needs some improvements.

My main target is the US, but I am open to positions in UK or Canada as well.

I am looking around to land on a tenure track position and I would be grateful if anyone can suggest a good strategy to identify possible opportunities. I keep seeing people around me getting interviews for positions I have never heard of, so I guess my search strategy needs some improvements. Especially, I am looking for positions in the area of systems and control.
My main target is the US, but I am open to positions in UK or Canada as well.

Thanks!

I had a job interview (Skype) for a post-doc at university A last Thursday, which I think went well. They say they would take 1 week to 10 days to get back to me.

I had applied to other positions before, and got a much less attractive offer from university B. I just received an email from university B saying that they’d really need to close the hiring process by the end of this week and would expect an answer from me in the next couple of days.

Would it be too aggressive to send an e-mail to University A to inquire about my chances when it’s only been a few days after the interview? On the other hand, it is pretty late in the job hunting season so I feel it would be understandable?

I had this included in another question that I asked, but was advised to make it a standalone question, due to its complexity. I worked under a professor whose research was funded by a non-profit organization. They were released from the university for some inappropriate behavior. The research that they have been publishing has been solid so, were it not for this incident, I would happily put it on a resume or application. The incident does not involve plagiarism or really anything that would make someone suspicious of the validity of their findings or published works. I understand that this is vague, but it is intentionally so for privacy and security reasons.

Until now, I have been putting down the name of the research program that the professor led that I was a part of. However, I am worried that employers may research the program, the professor, and the incident that resulted in their termination and make judgments about my character and work.

I am trying to finish the work that I started either alone, or with a professor at another university. I plan on acknowledging the university that I am enrolled at and the non-profit for providing the equipment and grant money, respectively. If I am able to continue the work with another professor at another university or simply publish on my own, then I may just discuss that aspect of the process in applications and interviews, but until the work is completed, any advice on how I should proceed?

I am about to submit my thesis. At the moment, I am looking for jobs, but my relationship with both of my Ph.D. supervisors is not good. Now I am facing another complication where I have to find a recommender for a job. I am too scared to get them to be my recommender, yet I will probably have a reason as to why not them.

My supervisors have showed many reaction which indicates that they dislike me, for example, scolding, ignoring emails, blaming, and talking behind my back. Nevertheless, I always act nice to them and say that I agree with them that it was all my fault.

I did not change the supervisors because of my stupidity thinking that nobody will accept me as my research field is tiny. These results in me feeling as if they all tried to dish me off from this program, but I was too stubborn.

I am about to submit my thesis. At the moment, I am looking for jobs, but my relationship with both of my Ph.D. sups is not good. Now I am facing another complication where I have to find a recommender for a job. I am too scared to get them to be my recommender, yet I will probably have a reason as to why not them.

My sups have showed many reaction which indicates that they dislike me, for example, scolding, ignoring emails, blaming, and talking behind my back. Nevertheless, I always act nice to them and comply with that it was all my faults.

I did not change the sups because of my stupidity thinking that nobody will accept me as my research field is tiny. These results in me feeling as if they all tried to dish me off from this program, but I was too stubborn.

I’ve been offered a side job working to answer submitted student questions (at my own discretion) related to my field of expertise for a study website. Seems pretty harmless as a way to earn very minor extra cash.

Would this have any implications for my prospects through the academic job market? I probably wouldn’t list it on a CV, but would a committee seeing this kind of activity see it as a bad thing?