How can a job applicant tactfully tell a hiring committee that they particularly want to live in the location where the school is located?

I am applying for a faculty job in the city where my wife’s family lives. I would love to move there to be close to her family when she and I have kids.

The school might be concerned that I would take another offer over theirs. I want to communicate that I would be particularly likely to accept their offer if they made one.

What is an appropriate way to communicate this? I want to avoid inserting unnecessary personal information, like my marital status or sexual orientation.

I’m thinking of something like this toward the end of the cover letter:
“I am particularly excited about this position for both personal and professional reasons. Most of my family lives in [city] and I would be thrilled to live there.”

I’m a PhD student in statistics in Europe, but I’m looking into the possibility of applying for jobs in academia in the US once I finish.

I am wondering what the job market looks like, generally speaking.

  • Is there a lot of competition for every position, or is it fairly “easy” to find a position somewhere?
  • How does the answer to the previous question change by type of position (tenure, assistant professor, lecturer, etc)?
  • How difficult is it for a European to get a position?

I know that the questions are very general, but it’d be very helpful to hear from anyone with experience from statistics departments.

I am a PhD student in one of the social sciences going on the market. A large organization funded part of my dissertation research, as part of a research partnership. I wrote a report for them with some of the data in return. The total funding was a couple hundred thousand dollars, which is a lot in my field.

I was hoping to list the funder and the amount in my CV and cover letter to demonstrate my record of linking my research with funding.

The organization however insists that specific funding figures are confidential and I cannot use the precise number of the total funding.

Without the ability to put the specific number, what is a tasteful way to indicate in my job application that I received this large amount of research support?

I am a postdoc applying for a research-level tenure-track assistant-professor position in 1st-world English-speaking or German-speaking countries. The area is Computer Science. The Web is full of recommendations on how to write an good job application of this type. Now, I’m spending about a week on a single application. I have my templates, which I adapt to the institution in question, but the adaptation process and the submission process takes really long, since the processes of the institutions differ. It ranges from different web sites for submission and ends with different names of documents (e.g., Reseach Plan vs. Reseach Statement vs. Research Objectives, …) and their lengths. You know how bad it can get, even if the types of all institutions are the same (e.g., CS departments at R1 universities). I’m not the strongest person in my subfield, so, I have to apply a lot (200+ applications) and widely to get a chance of, say, 50%. Therefore, I’d like to reduce the time from 1 week to, say, 1 hour.

  • What strategy could you propose to reduce the time while maintaining the quality?

  • If you have gone through this process already, what was your personal way of reducing the application effort?

Partial answers specifying, e.g., the time you take for different stages of the process, are also accepted:

  • adapting the cover letter,
  • adapting the CV,
  • adapting the teaching statement,
  • adapting the research statement,
  • adapting the publication list,
  • filling the forms on the Web page of the prospective employer,
  • getting informed about the prospective employer,
  • asking questions via e-mail or phone and receiving answers regarding the advertised position,
  • requesting reference letters,

I am a postdoc applying for a research-level tenure-track assistant-professor position in 1st-world English-speaking or German-speaking countries. The area is Computer Science. The Web is full of recommendations on how to write an good job application of this type. Now, I’m spending about a week on a single application. I have my templates, which I adapt to the institution in question, but the adaptation process and the submission process takes really long, since the processes of the institutions differ. It ranges from different web sites for submission and ends with different names of documents (e.g., Reseach Plan vs. Reseach Statement vs. Research Objectives, …) and their lengths. You know how bad it can get, even if the types of all institutions are the same (e.g., CS departments at R1 universities). I’m not the strongest person in my subfield, so, I have to apply a lot (200+ applications) and widely to get a chance of, say, 50%. Therefore, I’d like to reduce the time from 1 week to, say, 1 hour.

  • What strategy could you propose to reduce the time while maintaining the quality?

  • If you have gone through this process already, what was your personal way of reducing the application effort?

Partial answers specifying, e.g., the time you take for different stages of the process, are also accepted:

  • adapting the cover letter,
  • adapting the CV,
  • adapting the teaching statement,
  • adapting the research statement,
  • adapting the publication list,
  • filling the forms on the Web page of the prospective employer,
  • getting informed about the prospective employer,
  • asking questions via e-mail or phone and receiving answers regarding the advertised position,
  • requesting reference letters,

I wonder what is your job after finishing PhD. in humanities or social sciences?
I’m a Phd student of social anthropology and this is my 4th year. I have always wanted to stay at the university as a professor, but I can see it’s pretty hard to get a job there.
The other option for me is to work in some NGO, integration center for foreigners or research center. Last 2 months I’m searching for a job like crazy, because my research grant will expire soon and I need money and something to do. All situation makes me quite stressed and I reproach myself that I haven’t done things differently.
So, what is or what was your career path during and after PhD?

A PhD student of my advisor (I am a master student), having been enrolled the doctorate program for less than a year, is now unsure about whether or not to finish it.

One of his concerns is that if he continues, but eventually quits the doctorate program, and applies for a normal job, the future interviewer, during interview, may suspect his lack of ability due to the record of an unfinished PhD program.

However, if he does not write on his CV about the years during PhD program, the interviewer may further question about the absent years.

So, does a record of an unfinished PhD program makes employers doubt a person’s ability? Or are there other negative consequences in it (besides, of course, the opportunity cost of the time interval)?

In addition to helping me reassure him, such information also helps me to decide whether to get a PhD in the future.
(Not being anglophone, if I misused some terms in English please correct me.)

I did my Phd in mathematics in Europe and am at the end of my second year of postdoc in Europe too. I plan to apply for jobs in the US in the fall (ideally tenure track, but I wouldn’t mind too much doing a second postdoc, as I finished my phd early). I think it’s the best place for me, as most of the researchers in my field are in the US. But I’m not familiar with the american system at all, so I would be happy if you could help me answer a few questions:

  • I know most applications go through mathjobs.org and that there are hundreds of applications for a every position. What is the best technique for an application not to be overlooked? Is it common in the US to email a professor at the university which offers the job and let them know that you applied/tell them that you would like to work with them? If yes, is it even ok to email a professor that I don’t know personnaly but who I think knows my work or would be interested in it? In Europe it is very common and even necessary, at least in the countries I know, but I wouldn’t want to do something that is weird or unethical in the US.

  • Someone told me that US universities tend to favor people who are already working in the US, especially for tenure-track positions (something about not wanting to pay a flight from overseas for the interviews). Is that true? Is it the same for postdocs?

  • Is it weird to apply for both a tenure-track position and a postdoc position at the same university? If I did so, would they automatically think that they’d rather give me the postdoc as I’m ok with both, and give the tenure-track to someone who applied only to tenure-track?

  • Are the chances of getting hired in an university where no one works on the same things as I do very low? Of course I would prefer to be in an university with nice collaboration opportunities, but just in case I was thinking of applying to others too.

Thank you very much in advance for your replies!

In the United States it is not uncommon to apply to academic jobs all over the country. Personally, I do not know a single person who limited his or her search to just one state (i.e. Massachusetts). That being said, the language of instruction and the key aspects of academic culture remain the same coast to coast.

In comparison, what is the situation like in Europe, particularly Scandinavia and Switzerland?

For example, given that the population of Denmark is comparable in size to that of Massachusetts, how does this affect the academic job market? Is it standard practice for PhDs & lecturers/postdocs located in Denmark to search for their first career placement across Europe [and beyond]? Or do they search for employment primarily on the national academic job market? How do the national differences in language/academic culture fit into this equation?

Background: I’m considering PhD/Academic Career in Europe. Ideally, I would like to learn the local language and assimilate as much as possible during the PhD. Given this long-term effort, I would prefer to continue on in the same country following graduation.

I’m especially interested in hearing from those with experience in the social sciences and humanities (working or studying in Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, or Switzerland/Austria). However, please consider contributing even if you do not fit this particular set of criteria. My own experience is in Cult/Soc Anthropology (USA).

I am a tenured professor planning about seven years past the Ph.D. Over the past few years, I’ve applied to a handful of jobs (I haven’t been looking aggressively — just applied to the good opportunities that came up, along with 500 other people).

My references usually come from:
1) My Ph.D. advisor (who has moved to a new institution since I finished my Ph.D.).
2) another professor who taught me in graduate school.
3) a mid-career professor from another institution who has read some of my publications. He’s not a super-star academic that anyone from any field inmy discipline will know, but he is established and well known within my particular field.
4) (for jobs requiring four reference letters) another professor from my graduate institution.

This is basically the same set of letters I have used since I was on the market as an ABD student seven years ago. They worked back then for finding a tenure-track job, but I’m wondering now if I should shake things up — perhaps get away from having any letters from people at my graduate institution other than my Ph.D. advisor, for example. I worry that the letters from professors who only knew me in graduate school will seem stale (and frankly, I haven’t had much contact with these people since I graduated, so they probably can’t comment in detail on what I have been up to since I was a student).

If I don’t continue to rely largely on letters from professor at my graduate institution, whose letters should I replace them with? People who I think were anonymous reviewers for my books and articles? People who I think wrote letters for my tenure review? People in my current department whom I trust (this is tricky, of course, since I don’t want to advertise too loudly within the department that I am applying for new jobs)?

I’m in the humanities, for what that’s worth.