The Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) degree is widely discussed as a potentially bad investment as a graduate level degree at this time because few programs are funded, it is rather specific, and it is notoriously difficult to actually get a job in the field of librarianship with an MLIS. One of the major reasons I’ve seen cited for this is the number of graduates versus available positions, and lack of practical work experience among new MLIS graduates.

However, I may have the opportunity to work in a library for over a year during my undergraduate degree. If lack of practical work experience is indeed (?) a major factor in the difficulty of the library job market post-graduation, would an MLIS be a more practical investment for me considering I could gain this experience before beginning the graduate program, thus leaving with both a degree and experience? In general, when deciding whether to apply to or enter an unfunded Master’s program in a given field directly out of undergrad, should presence or lack of existing work experience in the field (or a related one) during undergrad be a major consideration?

I’m getting way ahead of myself, but being nervous on the job market I asked an advisor what happens should a candidate receive zero job offers. To which the reply was, “That never happens.”

I’m sure that some people have had this experience before. I’m in the social sciences in a discipline that is very competitive with fewer than normal options outside of academia. I still have a ways to go time wise for job expectations, but I am curious about what options others may have gone for in situations where they either received no offers or none that were more appealing than something else that wasn’t planned.

My assumption is that people will shoot for adjunct positions or similar options should nothing else come along, and try again in following years. Can anyone speak to being in this kind of position, or knowing someone who has gone through it?

Of course I expect and hope not to be in this position, but I am planning for everything. Others have told me that they apply for upwards of 70 positions in a year, which to me is insane (I don’t know how assured I could be in the quality of that many applications). I have probably applied for 20-25 positions thus far, so I don’t know if I should be approaching the process differently. And in the worst case situation, where to go from there?

I’m getting way ahead of myself, but being nervous on the job market I asked an advisor what happens should a candidate receive zero job offers. To which the reply was, “That never happens.”

I’m sure that some people have had this experience before. I’m in the social sciences in a discipline that is very competitive with fewer than normal options outside of academia. I still have a ways to go time wise for job expectations, but I am curious about what options others may have gone for in situations where they either received no offers or none that were more appealing than something else that wasn’t planned.

My assumption is that people will shoot for adjunct positions or similar options should nothing else come along, and try again in following years. Can anyone speak to being in this kind of position, or knowing someone who has gone through it?

Of course I expect and hope not to be in this position, but I am planning for everything. Others have told me that they apply for upwards of 70 positions in a year, which to me is insane (I don’t know how assured I could be in the quality of that many applications). I have probably applied for 20-25 positions thus far, so I don’t know if I should be approaching the process differently. And in the worst case situation, where to go from there?

It seems that I can’t find any evidence of just teaching positions in universities across Europe, aside from the temporary position for a semester or two. I am mainly interested in Italy, France, Switzterland but let’s make this a bit more broad so it applies to more people.

Every job ad I have seen requests publications and then asks to have a strong research agenda, raise funding, etc.

Do those positions still exists in Biology/Environmental Sciences and related fields? Or perhaps positions with minimal research pressure?

I am currently concluding my PhD in England and I’d like to do a postdoc preferably in the US or Canada. I want to know what is the best approach to find and apply for a postdoc position in the US/Canada? In specific, I’d like to know that:

1) Should I contact the supervisors directly when I find an interesting project or should I only contact PIs who advertised a postdoc position?

2) What should I include in my emails to potential recruiters? (obviously apart from my CV!)

3) If my publications are still pending [submission/review/publication], how should I mention them in my application?

4) If I want to apply for a position that is related to my PhD project, but I don’t have enough experience in the field how I should construct my statement letter? (Let say for example I worked in the field of genomics and I’d like to do a postdoc in machine learning!)

I am under the impression that holding a European style PhD (3 year research) already put me in disadvantage for getting a postdoc in the US/Canada? Is that true? how best this could be dealt with?

I have a tenure track position in the top 10 universities. My husband joined the department as a lecturer. Being on a promotion I applied everywhere as well as my husband did. Right now we’ve got an offer from another place for 2 tenure line positions. The place is ranked around 50th. Not sure if the ranking actually helps while you read this.

I know my husband wanted to have a tenure track position all the time and got discouraged that he didn’t. In fact he stopped to publish 3 years ago. Technically we’ve been offered these positions as the university wants to hire me. My main issue is that I think my husband is very talented if not a genius, and needs a push in his career. On the other hand, it feels that going to a small place in the middle of nowhere will not make me any good. Also he will not be able to accept the position without me, as we come as a package.

I am writing to ask for opinions on this situation. My husband also closes himself from discussions. But the decision has to be made somehow.

I’m very early in my PhD (just past 6 months) and out of interest I was looking at some post-doc positions that I could aim towards.

I found a recently advertised position that is in the exact field I am aiming for. Essentially it sounds like I’d be a perfect match… in three years time.

I was thinking of sending one of the Chief Investigators an email introducing myself and expressing interest in positions like this one for the future (obviously not applying though) so he would be aware of my name and perhaps keep me in mind so I could apply if a similar position came available at a more appropriate time.

Is this a common thing to do? Would it be positively or negatively received?

For reference, the field is mathematical biology.