I’m an assistant professor at an undergraduate institution with significant research expectations. A number of my colleagues insist on calling our school director their boss, which I find bizarre. In my training,
the head of an academic unit is a distinguished colleague to whom we are indebted to — they sacrifice research time to perform necessary but tedious bureaucratic work — but not a ‘boss’. What is the norm at most institutions? Is there a division between primarily teaching and research institutions?

Many of my peers in my program, Computer Engineering, are of the opinion that what you do in school is a “head-fake”, that you take all this intense math and science essentially to prove that you can accomplish difficult tasks quickly. A “real job” doesn’t actually use any of that junk except for a few select classes.

I suppose I understand that sentiment, but my issue is that after something like 20 years of math, Stockholm Syndrome has kicked in and I really enjoy it. I will miss it. I just finished one of the hardest classes at my University with an A because Fourier Transform just makes sense to me. Learning how to operate some software program is not the same as learning how to build a differential amplifier. Not all learning is equal. I have had two fantastic Co-Op (internship) rotations with some big name companies working on great projects, but the most intense math I used was division and that makes me sad. While my peers cannot wait to graduate and start their lives, it feels like it is the end of mine.

It seems that industry, for every 1 person actually producing something, there are 20 people doing documentation, management, talking to the customer, supply chain, etc etc. (edit: and I do not mean that in a derogatory manner, I am actually getting an MBA as well at the moment. I just mean that the one person who uses their academic knowledge is followed by a slew of people who do not use it).

So, the obvious answer is to go through a PhD and enter Academia but I do not think that is the right path for me considering I have no desire to teach and I also really enjoy making the money I do now. Putting my fiscal life on hold for another 4-5 years seems like quite a lot as I am already in debt.

My question then, is, how do I use what I learned in school while in industry? Or should I leave industry and pursue academia? Should I still go for a PhD but do industry research? How can I continue to learn while I am working in industry?

Apologies if this question is unclear, it’s very nebulous and if this gets removed or -1 I understand.

Looking at the different tech related bachelor’s degrees, such as computer science, information technology, info/cyber security, software engineering, etc, how different, if at all, are the job prospects for people who have these degrees? By job prospects, I mean considering factors such as number of jobs available, number of job types/career paths available, new grad unemployment rates, entry-level and mid-career pay, and number of graduates per year versus annual job growth.

If this is not the appropriate place to ask this question, please advise where I should look for an answer. Thanks!

I am trying to apply for a job in a university research office, administering Honour’s, Master’s and PhD thesis submissions. The selection criteria requests:

1. Demonstrated ability to apply theoretical knowledge, 
at degree level, in a straightforward way.

2. Ability to solve problems through the standard application 
of theoretical principles and techniques at degree level.

Can anyone tell me what they are asking for, and examples of how one could demonstrate these skills?

Thanks

I am asking this question because I simply do not know.

The story is that some department (northern continental Europe for what is worth) is (unofficially for the moment) negotiating an Assistant Professor position. The offered teaching/research load is 50-50 which sounds OK in theory. In reality, this translates to a minimum of 3 courses per year plus supervision of bachelor’s and master’s candidates as well as administrative tasks.

On the other side of the spectrum, they do not offer any starting package whatsoever: no PhD students, not even basic equipment like laptop or traveling allowance, only a relatively good (for EU standards) salary with no additional benefits (married/child, whatever). They said that I should (imperative hint) apply for external funding (i.e., more work).

Thus my questions:

  1. Is this considered a true 50-50 research/teaching? I do not see how is this possible. It seems that for research would be only a modest 30% of the time and mostly during summer which is absurd for younger people (more ideas for new research)

  2. Is this considered a normal offer? I would like to see other people’s opinions/experiences.

The argument for the offer is basically: take any position that comes in the way, given that the academic job market can be brutal. But I am really afraid this would mean the end of my research at least in its current form, given also that I won’t be able to even have any PhD student at least in the next 3 or so years at least, if I ever have them.

I am asking this question because I simply do not know.

The story is that some department (northern condinental europe for what is worth) is (unofficially for the moment) negotiating an Assistant Professor position. The official teaching/research load is 50-50 which sounds OK. This translates to 3 courses (minimum) per year + bachelor + master student supervision + some administrative tasks.

On the other side of the spectrum, they do not offer any starting package: no PhD students, not even equipment, only a relatively good (for EU standards) salary with no additional benefits (married/child, whatever). They said that I should (imperative hint) apply for external funding (i.e. more work).

Thus my questions:

  1. Is this considered a true 50-50 research/teaching? I do not see how is this possible. It seems that for research would be only a modest 30% of the time and mostly during summer.

  2. Is this considered a normal offer?

The argument for the offer is basically: take any position that comes in the way, given that the academic job market can be bruttal. But I am really afraid this would mean the end of my research at least in its current form, given also that I won’t be able to even have any PhD student at least in the next 2/3 of years at best, if I ever have.

I am asking this question because I simply do not know.

The story is that some department (nortern condinental europe for what is worth) is (unofficially for the moment) negotiating an Assistant Professor position. The official teaching/research load is 50-50 which sounds OK. This translates to 3 courses (minimum) per year + bachelor + master student supervision + some administrative tasks.

On the other side of the spectrum, they do not offer any starting package: no PhD students, not even equipment, only a relatively good (for EU standards) salary with no additional benefits (married/child, whatever). They said that I should (imperative hint) apply for external funding (i.e. more work).

Thus my questions:

  1. Is this considered a true 50-50 research/teaching? I do not see how is this possible. It seems that for research would be only a modest 30% of the time and mostly during summer.

  2. Is this considered a normal offer?

The argument for the offer is basically: take any position that comes in the way, given that the academic job market can be bruttal. But I am really afraid this would mean the end of my research at least in its current form, given also that I won’t be able to even have any PhD student at least in the next 2/3 of years at best, if I ever have.

I am an undergraduate student that majored in Financial Mathematics. I come from China and is pursuing bachelor’s degree in the United States. I plan to pursue my master’s and doctor’s degree in Mathematical Logic (or Logics in Math as shown on USNews ranking website) for the next 10 years (still in US). I am not quite sure whether I will go back to China or stay in America (maybe even go to Germany since my cousin is there). Let’s say I want to stay in foreign countries and be an instructor in universities, what should I do to achieve my goal? Furthermore, my ultimate goal is to be a professor, what requirements I need to meet?

I know this question may be too silly for lots of people, but the situations in occident and China are significantly different so I really want to hear something from you guys (wherever you come from). What I learned is that once I got doctor’s degree in America I would definitely find an instructor position in universities in China (but I’m not sure with Mathematical Logic major). As a result I do not worry too much about my future if I go back to China. But I think US and other countries may have rules that are more strict than China’s.

Thank you very much for your time and efforts reading this and expressing your opinion. I would be appreciated if you could show respect and patience to others. Have a nice day!

I am an undergraduate student majored in Financial Mathematics. In fact I come from China and is pursuing bachelor’s degree in the United States. I plan to pursue my master’s and doctor’s degree in Mathematical Logic (or Logics in Math as shown on USNews ranking website) for next 10 years (still in US). I am not quite sure whether I will go back to China or stay in America (even go to Germany since my cousin is there), let’s say I want to stay in foreign countries and be an instructor in universities — what shall I do to achieve my goal? Furthermore, my ultimate goal is to be a professor, what requirements I need to meet?

I know this question may be too silly for lots of people, but the situations in occident and China are significantly different so I really want to hear something from you guys (wherever you come from). What I learn is that once I got doctor’s degree in America I would definitely find an instructor position in universities in China (but I’m not sure with Mathematical Logic major). As a result I do not worry too much about my future if I back to China. But I think US and other countries may have rules that are more strict than China’s.

Thank you very much for your time and efforts reading this and expressing your opinion. I would be appreciated if you could show respect and patience to others. Have a nice day!

I came across some job advertisements for faculty positions that stated

Strictly No Agencies

This implies that some agencies apply on behalf of the applicants. Is it common? Is it possible at all? I mean do open positions without the above statement accept applications sent by agencies rather than the applicant?

I know that the recruitment for senior industry positions is outsourced and handled by agencies, but this should be a different case.