I have an admission from Oxford University DPhil (CSE) . I also have a job in Silicon Valley with a startup that is a well funded late stage venture . Which one should I choose ? I am looking for insights in Visa differences , Rewards after the Dphil vs the current rewards I will get from the job. I am aware that I might not get the same salary in UK as in US . I am also aware that Oxford itself has great prestige. So my question also weighs prestige against money in my opinion.

I have a difficult situation about limit of absences during classes in my university.

The teacher of one subject made a rule that 3 absences with disrespectful reason during the course leads to fail grade. I’ve exceeded this limit because of my part-time job, which I need to perform in order to pay for my education.

One (and almost the only) respectful reason for absence is illness. Illness must be proven using a medical certificate from a doctor. The teacher asked me to show a certificate. Obviously I don’t have it.

However, I did all the tasks and presented them.

Now I have a dilemma:

Try to forge the document about illness OR try to explain my situation about work.

Each option is a risk. The risk of forgery is obvious. And the risk of trying to explain my situation is that the teacher can say that he doesn’t care about that, and then forgery will be impossible, and so I will automatically fail the course.

What should I do in this situation?

I have a difficult situation about limit of absences during classes in my university.

Teacher of one subject made a rule that 3 absences with disrespectful reason during course leads to fail grade. I’ve exceeded this limit because of my part-time job that I need to perform in order to pay for my education.

One (and almost the only) respectful reason is illness that I need to prove using medical certificate from a doctor. Teacher asked me to show certificate. Obviously I don’t have it.

However, I did all the tasks and presented them.

Now I have a dilemma:

Try to forge the document about illness OR try to explain my situation about work.

Each option is a risk. Risk of forgery is obvious. And risk of trying to explain my situation is that teacher can say that he doesn’t care about that, and then forgery will be impossible – I will automatically fail the course.

What should I do in this situation?

I recently completed my PhD and now I looking for my first postdoc. Right now I’m in a terrible situation.

During my PhD, I had the possibility to join a great research group in the US and before to leave, the PI asked me to come back for a postdoc.
He was a great mentor and I really would work with him again, because I’m interested in his research line (totally different from my education).
I thought about it a lot, and I decided to go! So I called him to get more information, but he told me that had had a great opportunity at NCI in another city and decided to relocate the lab there, but he said that if I wanted to go with him he would be happy!
Since he must officially sign in May and we talked in February, he suggested to me to do other application as well. Then we talked again in March, and he told me he could start the application process on May.
In the meantime, I did others applications. I had a good feedback and one of these already sent me the official offer.
I’m evaluating this offer, but I really want to work with the PI that I already know and admire.

What do you suggest? What I could say to the PI that I waiting for?
I’d very much appreciate your opinion and reflection on this topic.

Are there any studies that have compared the number of hours worked by faculty members who are teaching-focused vs. those at research intensive institutions?

I have the impression that faculty that balance teaching and research tend to work longer hours and on weekends more than faculty who do not have any research obligations. I don’t know where I picked this idea up and I’m suspicious that it is biased and based more on opinion than fact.

Any studies/surveys out there to support / refute this idea?

I’m interested mainly in science departments in the USA.

Although I do research in science as my day job, I spend most of my free time for my life-long hobby, drawing cartoon. But I keep this fact in secret to my research co-workers since the culture of scientific community and that of comics artists are quite different, and I’m tired of looking like a person with an exotic hobby. But recently my ‘career’ as an artist became more successful than I expected (made a contract with a publisher, etc.), I started to worry about my future choices. Would it be wise to pursue two very different careers in my life, researcher and artist?

Many famous comics (e.g. PHD comics, xkcd) from ex-scientists are mostly for the people who are already in the culture of science and maybe it would be OK to be that kind of artist and you could still be accepted in researcher community. However my art style is pretty different from that of other many famous scientist-comics artists. When I draw comics, I try to be like other usual professional artists so that I can draw more attention from the general audience. As a result, my works may contain stimulating elements that would be considered absurd or obscene when read out of context. I’m not saying that my works are particularly unhealthy; comics in general are for fun, and my works are just one of them. It’s just that my works are not very educational. Another concern is time and effort; drawing absorbs lots of time and energy when your art style is not simplistic.

Because of these reasons, I ask for advices from researchers who also have large passion for their asrtistic desire; how do you manage to do both of them? Would being a commercial artist give you disadvantage as a researcher in academia?

I am a first-year Master’s student in biomedical sciences (neuroscience track) and am contemplating whether to pursue a PhD or apply for a job in industry after I graduate. The reason I am having this dilemma is that although I really enjoy working in the lab, I know I don’t want to stay in academia forever and I am not even sure if I want to be doing benchwork/research for the rest of my life (what if I want to explore the business side of things…). I’m gaining a lot of knowledge in my master’s program but I have no clue what it’s like in the corporate world. But in industry I feel like I would hit a glass ceiling with just a M.S and not be able to go up the ladder…
So my main question is, do I go for a PhD and spend the next 5 years in an academic lab and then apply for industry jobs or do I go straight to industry and explore different options (probably start in R&D and work my way to different fields if possible)?

I am looking for Job change somewhere in Australia, currently working in India!

I have done B.TECH, M.tech and Ph.D. degree in the field of Mechanical Engineering along with 10 years of teaching experience in different position!!

Is there anyone in this community, who have gone through a similar phase?

Any input would be greatly appreciated !! Thanks in advance

I personally see no practical difference between dropping out of a PhD program and quitting a regular job, at least considering the way PhDs work in the US, especially in STEM fields, but I’m sure many people will disagree. Please let me elaborate why I think that way, and let me know if I’m being too naive or missing an important difference. I really want to see a difference, but so far I can’t find any meaningful one.

At least in the US, PhD students are often employees of the university, they hold a research assistant position, get paid a salary and declare it as taxable income. Most people I’ve talked with in academia agree that the main point of doing a PhD is working on your own research rather than taking classes, which should just be a complement. That sounds pretty much like what you do at a regular job than what you do in a master’s or undergrad degree; you have a main project to work on, and maybe some ocasional training sessions that might be useful for your work. Some people like to point out that dropping out of a PhD program has some sort of stigma attached to it because it means that you couldn’t finish something you began. However, I see no difference between that situation and quitting a regular job where you had a long-term project that you realized was going nowhere, had no future or was needlessly stressful, and you decided not to waste your time trying to finish it and find something better. My view is that if you leave a PhD program with no degree, but you worked for some years as a research assistant, you can still write it down in your resume as a research assistant position you had at the university, so it’s pretty much just another job for practical purposes, I don’t understand why the fact that you didn’t get the degree is such a big deal for some people.

Something I should emphasize is that I’m biased in my thinking towards STEM fields and people who enter PhD programs, but have no intention to stay in academia. If one wants to become a professor, dropping out of a PhD program is obviously a big deal, since it’s often a requirement, but I’m talking about people who do PhDs mainly to get better jobs in industry. I know some will point out that that’s probably a bad reason to do a PhD to begin with, but honestly, I’ve met many PhD students who think that way, especially in computer science and other STEM fields. Regardless, many people also begin a PhD because they are really interested in working on a specific area and that area happens to be developed more in academia than in industry at some point in time (machine learning is a good example), but they don’t have any intention of staying in academia and plan to get a job in industry afterwards. Still, they might get disappointed about the area or the environment along the way, the same way one might serious negative aspects of what seemed at first as an interesting job.

I’m especially interested in reading people who disagree with any of the specific points I mentioned before and why they are not valid analogies between dropping out of a PhD program and quitting a job. If this looks more like an open-ended discussion rather than an appropriate question for this site, feel free to put it on hold, but I’d appreciate if you can point me to a more appropriate site where this kind of discussion can take place. This site is the only one I know where well-informed academics congregate.