I am from a country where this is quite a decision.

Whether or not to get a job right away graduating is something most engineers, like myself, fear.

I just graduated and I couldn’t get a job so far despite having a high-quality curriculum (speaking 3 languages, programming, experience abroad).

But I have this good offer to start a Master’s Degree at a top university.

What should you recommend?

A professor of mine once told me graduate studies pay in the long term. He decided to go for a Master then PhD studies because of it last longer. According to him, you got to sacrifice a few more years of your life but once you finish it, you are certain your life is going to be better.

I am from Brazil. Tell me about similar situations in your countries.

According to Sean Carroll, a famous cosmologist and tenured professor,

Don’t be too well known outside the field. I hate to say this, but the evidence is there: if you have too high of a public profile, people look at you suspiciously. Actual quote: “I’m glad we didn’t hire Dr. X; he spends too much time in the New York Times and not enough time in the lab.” And that’s the point — it’s not that people are jealous that you are popular, it’s that they are suspicious you care about publicity more than you do about research. Remember the Overriding Principle.

According to an opinion piece by Manil Suri published in the New York Times, in science it is also not appropriate to talk about hobbies. Manil Suri is a famous scholar, his description of the situation in academia is worrying, and gives the impression that behavior is constrained and under close scrutiny. Being too expressive of personal identity can be viewed as running counter to scientific neutrality. In competitive venues, where complete immersion in one’s field might be the promoted ideal, the mention of an extracurricular pursuit can even be seized upon as a lack of commitment. I remember a young mathematician at a prestigious research institute sharing his love for piano playing after hearing I wrote fiction. “Don’t tell anyone in my department I own a piano,” he requested in the next breath. This is a shock to me because I perceived the STEM field as most openminded.

Am I hurting my chances by answering honestly about hobbies and extracurricular and social engagement activities? I work in a STEM field.

According to Sean Carroll, a famous cosmologist and tenured professor,

Don’t be too well known outside the field. I hate to say this, but the evidence is there: if you have too high of a public profile, people look at you suspiciously. Actual quote: “I’m glad we didn’t hire Dr. X; he spends too much time in the New York Times and not enough time in the lab.” And that’s the point — it’s not that people are jealous that you are popular, it’s that they are suspicious you care about publicity more than you do about research. Remember the Overriding Principle.

Don’t be too well known outside the field. I hate to say this, but the evidence is there: if you have too high of a public profile, people look at you suspiciously. Actual quote: “I’m glad we didn’t hire Dr. X; he spends too much time in the New York Times and not enough time in the lab.” And that’s the point — it’s not that people are jealous that you are popular, it’s that they are suspicious you care about publicity more than you do about research. Remember the Overriding Principle.

according to an opinion piece by Manil Suri published in the New York Times, in science it is also not appropriate to talk about hobbies. Manil Suri is a famous scholar, his description of the situation in academia is worrying, and gives the impression that behavior is constrained and under close scrutiny. Being too expressive of personal identity can be viewed as running counter to scientific neutrality. In competitive venues, where complete immersion in one’s field might be the promoted ideal, the mention of an extracurricular pursuit can even be seized upon as a lack of commitment. I remember a young mathematician at a prestigious research institute sharing his love for piano playing after hearing I wrote fiction. “Don’t tell anyone in my department I own a piano,” he requested in the next breath. This is a shock to me because I perceived the STEM field as most openminded.

Am I doing wrong to myself, by answering honestly questionnaire about hobbies and extracurricular and social engagement activities?
STEM field, US related.

I the United Kingdom there is a very useful website (jobs.ac.uk) which allows researchers to search academic jobs, including postdoctoral positions, lecturer’s posts, and so forth. I have been looking for similar search engines for other countries, in particular France, without much luck. If anybody with some experience of looking for academic research positions, fellowships and contracts in France could share their experience it would be great.

I was wondering whether there’re job sites that post jobs in applied/interdisciplinary mathematics, more specially, say postdocs or higher positions in mathematics and medical imaging, mathematics and computer vision. I’m aware of mostly all the popular job sites, mathjobs, euro math jobs, jobs.ac.uk, nordic math jobs etc etc, but most of the jobs there are of ‘pure’ nature, with very few for applied/interdisciplinary. I find it a little strange, since it seems (I might be mistaken) that they’ve more funding in the interdisciplinary areas, which should mean they’d have more available jobs too, but I don’t see any!

For my particular case, I’m trying to find postdoctoral position in mathematical imaging problems, which would use significant amount of conformal/quasiconformal mappings, Riemann surfaces, differential geometry etc. I guess looking into individual group’s webpage is an option, but that’s just too much work, since you’ve to google them first, then see what groups actually work in your areas, then look at their sites etc. But if there’s an webpage containing all the information, that’ll be much better!

So, if you know any such website for the above (for Europe and the US), I’d appreciate if you could pass them onto me. Thanks! And sorry for having sounded so shameless about the funding comparison.

Context:

I am on my third year doing a PhD in Engineering in a North American University. The norm in my institution is that a PhD is 5-6 years long. I was funded through the past period of time through a scholarship. The “understanding” is that the advisor funds students after the initial three years but nothing is formal.

Situation:

My advisor found an internship opportunity for me and “strongly” suggested that I take it. In this case, the company pays me while I am there. During that time, he gets matching funding from the government. The idea is that he would use the matching funding to pay me after the internship ends. He basically takes the money and gives to me back later. I trust that he will do that. I am not sure if this is considered normal or not in acadima but that is not my question.

The problem:

The problem is that some aspects of this specific internship seem abnormal to me and I want to get feedback from the community about these aspects.

Questions:

1- The internship is for 9 Months. It is full-time internship and I will not have time to work on my PhD. This means that my PhD is extended by 9 Months (5-6 Years + 9 Months). Is this a normal period of time for a PhD internship? I have seem people go on a 3-4 Months internships and even 6 in one case but never 9.

2- The tasks of this internship seems to be a long the lines of a Full-time engineering job. There does not seem to be any research involved. My thinking was that a PhD internship would help me develop my research skills and this seems to be an internship for a masters student or an undergrad. Is it normal for an PhD internship to be a full-time job in disguise?

3- The internship is located in another city. I have to move there for 9 months. This would require me to completely change my living situation twice in 9 months. Is this considered normal?

I am considering passing on this opportunity and finding a more suitable one myself. I just wanted to get feedback from experienced people before doing so. I would appreciate any input.

I am a lecturer having 6years of experience in Bangalore India . I have completed MSc Computer Science and currently pursuing M.Phil in Computer Science. I wanted to know what term is used in Germany for lecturer and the different ranks or designation given and will I get a job as professor or lecturer in Germany.I have knowledge of research. And what is the minimum salary I would get

I am currently a masters student that is due to finish early next year. I have a scholarship which covers costs and pays me a modest wage up until and including PhD. I would like to do my PhD but I am concerned about the job opportunities that will be available to me after graduating due to my age and skill set. I would be in my mid 30’s when graduating and would like to work in a non academic, non laboratory environment after graduating. At some time later in life I would like to return to academia but at least after graduating I would prefer to not do so.
How are somewhat older PhD’s perceived by employers outside of academia ? Do they have a harder time being employed ? I have read PhD’s are often considered over qualified or to focused in their knowledge making them not as desirable to employers, is this still the case ?