I’ve never delved deeper into this but I’m still curious: do I need to be enrolled in a PhD to publish scientific papers?

I have a MSc but I regularly read research papers of not-so-great-a-quality and think “I might write better stuff than this”. It doesn’t happen with the majority of papers but the point is: I don’t think those authors are all smarter than me.

How does a ‘private citizen’ not enrolled in any PhD course publish a research to a journal?

The following links explains the “Guide for Authors” for the “Computers & Security” journal:

https://www.elsevier.com/journals/computers-and-security/0167-4048/guide-for-authors

However, I cannot find a latex template for this journal. Does it mean that I can write the paper in any template format ?

Here is an example of a paper that is published in Computers & Security” journal. However, I need a latex template:

Example Paper in PDF

Usually for the journals we have impact factor and for the conferences we have acceptance rate.

Now, is it possible to guess the acceptance rate of a journal using its impact factor ? For example, for this journal:

https://www.journals.elsevier.com/computers-and-security/call-for-papers/special-issue-on-blockchain-and-cryptocurrency

whose impact factor is 2.650

I am a Phd student in Applied probability looking for postdoc jobs after submitting thesis. My question is that what is the value of arxiv papers (not yet published in a journal) compared to papers published in a journal while applying for postdoc. For example, If I have 2 journal papers and 1 arxiv paper whereas someone has 3 journal papers, will he gets any benefit over me.

Thanks in advance.

Usually for the journals we have “impact factor” and for the conferences we have “acceptance rate“.

Now, is it possible to guess the acceptance rate of a journal using its impact factor ? For example, for this journal:

https://www.journals.elsevier.com/computers-and-security/call-for-papers/special-issue-on-blockchain-and-cryptocurrency

whose impact factor is 2.650.

Just wondering: I read the words ‘mediocre journal’ several times by now. When selecting journals I see different types of indices. Sometimes journals have for example higher SJR-scores and lower H-rankings and vice versa. How should I interpret these variety of indices and when (or why) is a journal a mediocre one?

What steps does a manuscript typically go through from submission to publication (or rejection) in a typical journal? How are these steps referred to, in particular by editorial systems, and how long do they each typically take?

Note that this question is about the typical situation and hence not about:

  • Journals with an atypical workflow, e.g. those that allow for an instantaneous reviewer–author interaction.
  • Exceptional steps or rare occurrences such as withdrawal or clerical errors.

This is a canonical question on this topic as per this Meta post. Due to its nature, it is rather broad and not exemplary for a regular question on this site. Please feel free to improve this question.

What steps does a manuscript typically go through from submission to publication (or rejection) in a typical journal? How are these steps referred to, in particular by editorial systems, and how long do they each typically take?

Note that this question is about the typical situation and hence not about:

  • Journals with an atypical workflow, e.g. those that allow for an instantaneous reviewer–author interaction.
  • Exceptional steps or rare occurrences such as withdrawal or clerical errors.

This is a canonical question on this topic as per this Meta post. Due to its nature, it is rather broad and not exemplary for a regular question on this site. Please feel free to improve this question.