Part of my job is creating learning materials (such as example questions) mostly for first year undergraduate students in Engineering, and i find it difficult to believe that there does are no free online resources for example questions based on topics. It is crazy to think that every time an institute wants example questions they have to make them from scratch instead of having an online place for people to post to and look at when needed.

I know that MIT open course ware now has some assignment materials, however you cant search by topic (ex: search for “eigenvalues” to get a list of problems to test eigenvalue knowledge) as well as its only MIT and there aren’t many assignments per topic (and some require you to have the book which defeats the purpose).

Is there anything similar out there I could use to get examples from and even put my own examples out there for others to use?

(Keep in mind it has to be official, I know there are some places where students can upload materials from their courses but those are not always gotten with permission)

What is the more efficient way of self-teaching, when the return is diminishing? Keep on trying? or study more basic stuffs?

I am currently teaching myself a few subjects, but I have noticed that the learning curves are quite tricky now and then. Sometimes, it gets steep at the beginning, then it gets quite sucky later on (especially when I am in lack of some background knowledge. usually, I have to either look it up or make my own assumptions). Some other times, I have a humble beginning, but then it goes like rocket (e.g. for mathematics, when I tried to understand it, instead of memorizing it).

More specifically, I am learning writing in science on coursera. I am quite satisfied by the general tips (e.g. one main idea in each paragraph, and I had not known that at all), but when it comes to how “abstract”, “method”, “result”, etc. the suggestions sound quite alien to me (I have little experience in research), and I am also not making good progress. Therefore, I am not sure if it is normal for someone learning something completely new, or simply because my English is too lousy even as a non-native English speaker (hence, I had better to switch to basic English)

So what is the more efficient way of self-teaching, when the return is diminishing? Work harder as no pain no gain? or switch to more fundamental things? While I am looking for a scientific answer (backed-up by researches), I would also love any personal experience or insight as an answer.

What is the more efficient way of self-teaching, when the learning curve seems less and less steep? Keep on trying? or study more basic stuffs?

I am currently teaching myself a few subjects, but I have noticed that the learning curves are quite tricky now and then. Sometimes, it gets steep at the beginning, then it gets quite sucky later on (especially when I am in lack of some background knowledge. usually, I have to either look it up or make my own assumptions). Some other times, I have a humble beginning, but then it goes like rocket (e.g. for mathematics, when I tried to understand it, instead of memorizing it).

More specifically, I am learning writing in science on coursera. I am quite satisfied by the general tips (e.g. one main idea in each paragraph, and I had not known that at all), but when it comes to how “abstract”, “method”, “result”, etc. the suggestions sound quite alien to me (I have little experience in research), and I am also not making good progress. Therefore, I am not sure if it is normal for someone learning something completely new, or simply because my English is too lousy even as a non-native English speaker (hence, I had better to switch to basic English)

So what is the more efficient way of self-teaching, when the learning curve is less and less impressive? No pain no gain? or switch to more fundamental things? While I am looking for a scientific answer (backed-up by researches), I would also love any personal experience or insight as an answer.

I knew from some newspapers that Taiwanese education system prefers rote memorization over creativity. This culture was imported from Japan. This problem is also present in Singapore, Hong Kong, and Korea.

Although late, China seems to be the only country which is reforming its rote learning culture.

  • How can rote learning, in the universities of those countries, affect someone who is not used to with rote learning?
  • How do they maintain their quality of higher education with rote learning (apparently, a lot of universities from South East Asian countries are sitting in the top 50 positions)?

Note. I am talking about computer science.

I am wondering if anyone knows of any studies that indicate whether students read online texts more or less than hard copy texts.

I am in the midst of trying to “reboot” the intro stats class I teach and a big question in my mind is how effective the text is. Active learning (like the flipped classroom) requires the students read the material beforehand, and I’m not convinced (from the results I saw this year using a Pearson Learning Management System (LMS)) that the students are reading the online text very much.

I have a suspicion that students read the online texts less (and I plan to give my students a survey to check) but I’d like to know if there is any research supporting my limited observations.

I am currently a Software Engineering apprentice, doing a related degree as the academic side.

I have noticed that despite how passionate I am about software, things never ‘click’ with me when I first read about them or when someone explains them to me. This can be both academic and practical.

It sometimes takes me so long to get a grasp of a simple theory concept because I overthink and get muddled in my head, I am not that good at math and situations requiring intense thinking (as an example of basic situations that perplex me). And I’ve noticed my practical knowledge at work isn’t up to standard, I’m not as ‘good’ as I should be for this for how far into my job I am (almost a year).

It’s becoming increasingly embarrassing having to watch 4 different videos on basic topics so I can understand, or worse getting someone at work to keep varying their explanation so I understand. I find myself mapping technical concepts out on paper a lot which works but it shouldn’t be required of me for basic things and I can’t go about my life having to set aside pen and paper every time someone explains something to me.

I believe with effort I can achieve anything and am not phased by people who say you are ‘born an engineer’. Instead I guess I should to better my skill of learning.

I am seeking an answer as to how one can get better at learning, techniques, methodologies, books etc.

I’m curious about the pros/cons of including extra flavor text in quiz/exam questions.

For example, which would be better?

  1. What is the product of this reaction?

  2. The following molecule is found in a marine plant species, and has shown to inhibit cancer cell growth. One possible reason is due to the following reaction of this molecule. Provide the correct products of the reaction.

I’ve jumped back and forth between the two options. One on hand, I think it is beneficial to have students learn to parse text to determine important pieces of information. On the other hand, am I primarily interested in their passage reading skills or the content of the course (I realize the answer could be both)?

I also want to consider english language learners in this. Does it make things more equitable for students if there is less text to process through to get to the “actual” question?

I’m a recently admitted in a masters program in mathematics. My question is about “strategy” of learning. Should I focus on learning many things or should I pick an research area and start learning only stuff about that area? This is a problem because some scholars told me that if I want to get hired in academia, I must start publishing as early as possible so I better start to deepen my knowledge in certain area. However, actually I have not decided with area I fit the most, and I think that broadness is useful as well, because diversity is a necesity for creativity, just as professional musicians doesn’t just hear say classical music, but rock music, or latin music to get inspiration, I think that mathematicians must not just read about their own area, but related areas as well.

In your experience, which “strategy of learning” is better for a begginer in graduate school? I must say that I have freedom for choose courses.

I’m a recently admitted in a masters program in mathematics. My question is about “strategy” of learning. Should I focus on learning many things or should I pick an research area and start learning only stuff about that area? This is a problem because some scholars told me that if I want to get hired in academia, I must start publishing as early as possible so I better start to deepen my knowledge in certain area. However, actually I have not decided with area I fit the most, and I think that broadness is useful as well, because diversity is a necesity for creativity, just as professional musicians doesn’t just hear say classical music, but rock music, or latin music to get inspiration, I think that mathematicians must not just read about their own area, but related areas as well.

In your experience, which “strategy of learning” is better for a begginer in graduate school? I must say that I have freedom for choose courses.

I’m a recently admitted in a masters program in mathematics. My question is about “strategy” of learning. Should I focus on learning many things or should I pick an research area and start learning only stuff about that area? This is a problem because some scholars told me that if I want to get hired in academia, I must start publishing as early as possible so I better start to deepen my knowledge in certain area. However, actually I have not decided with area I fit the most, and I think that broadness is useful as well, because diversity is a necesity for creativity, just as professional musicians doesn’t just hear say classical music, but rock music, or latin music to get inspiration, I think that mathematicians must not just read about their own area, but related areas as well.

In your experience, which “strategy of learning” is better for a begginer in graduate school? I must say that I have freedom for choose courses.