I have a keen interest in some interdisciplinary fields such as neurophilosophy, neuroethics, and neuroaesthethics. In the end, I have chosen to study biology, but I am not entirely sure if it is the best possible choice, and maybe philosophy would have been a better choice.

What advice would you give to people in general who desire to be involved in interdisciplinary research? Do multiple bachelor’s or master’s degrees? Maybe even different PhD in the fields of interest?

What effect might it have on my chances of getting into a graduate school and my employment prospects if it took 5 years (or 4.5 years) to graduate?

My plan currently is to take a double major in mechanical engineering and electrical engineering, while going through all the Japanese and Russian language courses.

If I were to do it in four years, I would have to take 4 semesters with 6 classes and 4 semesters with 7 classes, as well as all 19 available classes from the summer and winter sessions available to me. My university does not allow 7 classes in a semester without permission and everyone I know who’s been to college has told me that it would be too much.

If I were to do it in 5 years, I could do 9 semesters with 5 classes and 1 semester with 6 as well as 3 summer sessions and 5 winter sessions. The 4th summer session could serve as a cushion in case of limited availability or study abroad programs/interships/co-ops.

I will be attending my first semester at Hofstra University this fall, and am hoping to work for NASA or SpaceX as an engineer while pursuing a masters part time, if that information helps.

What effect might it have on my chances of getting into a graduate school and my employment prospects if it took 5 years (or 4.5 years) to graduate?

My plan currently is to take a double major in mechanical engineering and electrical engineering, while going through all the Japanese and Russian language courses.

If I were to do it in four years, I would have to take 4 semesters with 6 classes and 4 semesters with 7 classes, as well as all 19 available classes from the summer and winter sessions available to me. My university does not allow 7 classes in a semester without permission and everyone I know who’s been to college has told me that it would be too much.

If I were to do it in 5 years, I could do 9 semesters with 5 classes and 1 semester with 6 as well as 3 summer sessions and 5 winter sessions. The 4th summer session could serve as a cushion in case of limited availability or study abroad programs/interships/co-ops.

I will be attending my first semester at Hofstra University this fall, and am hoping to work for NASA or SpaceX as an engineer while pursuing a masters part time, if that information helps.

To specify the question, because I did not want to make the title too long:

What effect might it have on my chances of getting into a graduate school and my employment prospects if it took 5 years (or 4.5 years) to graduate.

My plan currently is to take a double major in mechanical engineering and electrical engineering, while going through all the japanese and russian language courses.

If I were to do it in four years, I would have to take 4 semesters with 6 classes and 4 semesters with 7 classes, as well as all 19 available classes from the summer and winter sessions available to me. My university does not allow 7 classes in a semester without permission and everyone i know who’s been to college has told me that it would be too much.

If I were to do it in 5 years, I could do 9 semesters with 5 classes and 1 semester with 6 as well as 3 summer sessions and 5 winter sessions. The 4th summer session could serve as a cushion in case of limited availability or study abroad programs/interships/co-ops.

I will be attending my first semester at hofstra university this fall, and am hoping to work for NASA or SpaceX as an engineer while pursuing a masters part time, if that information helps.

I have to one select among the three universities for MS in Electrical Power Engineering

  1. North China Electric Power University (NCEPU)
  2. Xi’an Jiao Tong University (XJTU)
  3. Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU)

Shanghai Jiao Tong University has several joint degree programs as
SJTU-Monash University Dual Degree Program
SJTU-Norwegian University of Science and Technology Double Master degree program and others like these.

Please also provide your valuable suggestion about this especially about joint degree programs of SJTU whether they are good or traditional single university programs?

Thank you.

What are some universities in North America where you can choose freely (the programs are not pre determined)what you study in your combined/dual degree?

Such as the combined degree from mit allows you to choose two fields (unlimited)of your choice to study and schools like UBC has a combined major and dual majors that are pre determined (limited) like the combined major for computer science and commerce.

I am a Mechanical Engineering major applying for Ph.D. programs in Physics (in the US) who was always interested in Theoretical Physics but chose Mechanical Engineering due to a poor career choice at the time of the selection of undergrad major. Being interested in only theoretical physics, I didn’t care much about perfecting the engineering subjects and this is reflected in my grades. I have very good scores in Physics courses (except for an applied physics course). I am writing my SoP and have gotten advice from a lot of people that I should explain my choice of a different major despite my interest in physics as well as my average grades in engineering subjects. But I am not sure whether plainly telling them that I got viciously lured into engineering by being told “undergraduate physics education in our country is not good and one can easily switch to physics after the undergraduate program if one has done undergraduate studies in engineering” would help. Also, whether plainly telling the truth that I didn’t find engineering interesting and thus, my grades are average would help. It might (wrongly) show that I would not study uninteresting things that are required for some research project.

I have a fair amount of content to write about my interest in Physics, for example, I am pursuing a minor in Physics, I have done a good number of interesting research projects, I have attended some schools on theoretical physics, have taken a graduate course in GR, I have well-identified research interests, etc. etc. Is it required (or helpful) to write about why I chose a different major and why my grades are average in the engineering subjects? If yes then what should be the tone and approach?

I am a freshman at a university and so I am a little confused on to what type of courses should I be taking since there is a limit on the number of courses I can take.

I have three options

  1. Double Major in physics and maths and take 3,4 extra physics or maths electives

  2. Major in Physics, minor in maths and take extra 5,6 physics electives

  3. Major in maths, minor in physics and take extra 5,6 maths electives

Which option is better in terms of career and applying to a good graduate school?
Let me know if more clarification is required in this question.

Edit: Reading the comments I have altered my options a little

  1. Double Major in physics and maths and take 1 extra physics, 2 maths electives and 5 Programming/ Computer science electives

  2. Major in Physics, minor in maths and take extra 10 physics/ CS/ Programming/ Maths electives

  3. Major in maths, minor in physics and 10 physics/ CS/ Programming/ Maths electives

My question is about whether I should still stick with biology as my major.

I’m currently a first year biology undergraduate and I chose biology because my school does not offer neuroscience.

My interest in neuroscience was developed from prior interests about logic, formal systems and their application to the whole of science, how the brain and mind work, and the idea of how a mathematical model might open way to a unified theory of mind.

But recently I’ve come to realize while learning more about such topics, and that if I want to do theoretical research about the mind or something related after undergraduate school, I feel like I would gain “more” knowledge if I changed my major to something else instead of biology since I’ve strayed from the biological aspect of the brain and more towards the theoretical, plus a developing interest in mathematical logic.

Rather than biology I would consider (in no particular order) Mathematics, Philosophy, Computer Science, or Psychology. I wish I had enough knowledge and experience about the whole of each of those fields to conclude how they would align with my academic passion for the mind and logic, and is why I would really appreciate advice on what you would suggest I major in and why.

(Financial reasons wouldn’t be a factor in deciding)