I recently posted the above question along with another in the same post and was asked to post this one separately.

I have received a Marie-Curie individual fellowship from the European Commission. As a non-European, this allows me to take up research in a Member State. I know this fellowship is prestigious in Europe, but I’m not sure how it’s perceived in other parts of the world like the USA, Canada, Australia…etc. Any idea on this?

I got the prestigious Marie Curie individual fellowship (postdoc) and was wondering if anyone here has experience with this fellowship.

The proposal I wrote is good but I’m not sure if I want to stick to it 100%. What is the expectation in this regard?

Also, I know this fellowship is prestigious in Europe, but I’m not sure how it’s perceived in other parts of the world like USA, Canada and Australia. Any idea?

I will be moving to an EU country from outside.

I come from an EU country, and I am doing a PHD funded by a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (ITN).

The problem is that, after almost a year spent here, I realize that I do not like my subject, nor the professors. I would like to continue my PhD studies, but I need to make a change (professor, subject, maybe country).

I don’t know if it is possible to make such a change, while maintaining the Marie Skłodowska-Curie fellowship.

It is hard to find an answer because I prefer not to talk about this with my professors. Also, I asked a Marie Skłodowska-Curie project secretary, and she only told me that I can quit the PhD any time without any financial consequences for me.

I prefer not to give details about subject, the university, or the names of my professors. Still, feel free to ask me if you need more details and I hope I could make my question clearer thanks to your feedback!

Thank you all!

I come from an EU country and I follow a PHD thanks to Marie Curie Fellowship, created as an ITN.

The problem is that, after almost a year spent here, I realise that I do not like neither the subject, nor the professors.
I would like to continue my PHD studies but I need to make a change (professors, subject, maybe country).

I don’t know if it is possible to make such a change, while maintaining the Marie Curie Fellowship.

It is hard to find an answer because I prefer not to talk about this with my professors. Also I asked a Marie Curie secretary and she only told me that I can quit the PHD any time without any financial consequences for me.

I prefer not to give details about subject, university or the name of my professors. Still feel free to ask me if you need more details and I hope I could make my question clearer thanks to your feedback!

Thank you all!

I am a Marie Curie early stage researcher in a H2020 funded project (early training network, for those aware of the terminology), that’s spread between several universities in Europe (including where I am now, London /snark). I’m approaching the end of my contract.

This project is, according to the published figures, rather lavishly funded (€4 mil in total). Just in the “Research, Networking and Training Costs” there’s approx €200k for three researchers for three years (that comes to 1800/mo per researcher!). This excludes salary costs, management costs, etc.

This project has been plagued from the beginning by a serious lack of transparency and mismanagement, which has been slowly revealed throughout the duration of the project.

Some examples:

  • We, as researchers, were not consulted as to what training we need, and were “forced” to go to courses & workshops organised by the consortium partners, which half of the time were useless (completely off topic).
  • Even if we didn’t attend said workshops (out of desperation to get work done, in my case), the host university would still pay the organising partner a set “participation” fee.
  • I was told there’s no budget to go to conferences, even if I had a paper in. Some of us had to pay up front for our secondment related travel costs (at our industry partners).
  • We were told secondments were mandatory 8 months, whereas actually they were maximum 8 months.
  • My host university slotted me in at the wrong pay grade for two years (was being underpaid – this issue is sorted, but just goes to show). They’re still using the wrong conversion rate, instead of the ECB rate (£0.7 for €1), but apparently that’s going to get sorted at the end of the contract.

My conundrum is simple: I’ve just been told that my host university has overspent, and there’s no more money for me to go to an important industry board meeting where I was invited due to the research I’ve been doing so far, and supposed to talk about it in front of a couple of important industry actors in my field.

I’m a bit fed up. I have never seen a single excel sheet of sorts on what the money has been spent so far, by whom and on what. It has been consistently denied to us. From my own book-keeping, I’ve spent, so far, somewhere in the range of 1/5th of my total budget.

I’m afraid to push too hard on my supervisors for details, as I still need to (write and) submit a dissertation with them, and maybe get a PhD degree – and they might easily get offended.

I also believe this should be “sorted out” at one point or the other. I’ve been previously working in practice (Architecture & Engineering) for 4 years where such behaviour would have spelled instant trouble and litigations. How would one report/flag serious concern/blow a whistle on such a project, in the rather sensitive British cultural context?

Disclaimer: I do realise I am in a very lucky position, and life can be much worse in academia & research than I’m having it… it’s just that I might have a too developed sense of justice or need for clarity for my own good.