I am currently a second year mathematics undergraduate and will be undertaking a research placement (in topology/decision problems in group theory) at the maths faculty this coming summer.

My supervisor has asked that I apply for research grants. Currently I have the potential to be funded (at least partially) by the maths faculty, and also the London Mathematical Society (LMS). To be safe though I would like to apply to as many places as possible.

I have heard of large company funding research in mathematics so perhaps I should just email large companies and ask them if they are willing to help fund my project? Has anyone heard of success of this before?

Are there any other sources of funding I have not mentioned above?

Any help would be appreciated.

(I will be in England to clarify)

I think a similar question was answered in PhD Research under guide/advisor of a different department by JeffE. I’m asking a slightly different question. Yet if you find it identical to the above one, you can report it to be ‘duplicate.’

The deadline of math PhD programs I’m applying for is approaching and passing, but I guess asking this question isn’t too late. I’m interested in both pure math and machine learning, and I chose to apply to math PhD exclusively due to my background. However, recently I’ve been into developing an algorithm related to proof verification and others for application to mathematics using the state-of-the-art deep learning techniques. I’m certain most or all professors in math department I’m applying to (or anywhere else) aren’t working in such an approach, since that’s more of a job of professors in CS department. Though the answer may be case-by-case, is this kind of topic appropriate for my PhD thesis? I understand that I can have a co-adviser from CS dept., but is this topic likely to get accepted from math department? If so, by any chance if my interest totally shifts to machine learning proper and has nothing to do with mathematics at the late stage of my PhD, do I still have to work on something related to math in this sense? (I assume the answer is Yes.)

The deadline of math PhD programs I’m applying for is approaching and passing, but I guess asking this question isn’t too late. I’m interested in both pure math and machine learning, and I chose to apply to math PhD exclusively due to my background. However, recently I’ve been into developing an algorithm related to proof verification and others for application to mathematics using the state-of-the-art deep learning techniques. I’m certain most or all professors in math department I’m applying to (or anywhere else) aren’t working in such an approach, since that’s more of a job of professors in CS department. Though the answer may be case-by-case, is this kind of topic appropriate for my PhD thesis? I understand that I can have a co-adviser from CS dept., but is this topic likely to get accepted from math department? If so, by any chance if my interest totally shifts to machine learning proper and has nothing to do with mathematics at the late stage of my PhD, do I still have to work on something related to math in this sense? (I assume the answer is Yes.)

Most published math papers are answers to open questions posed by the authors of the papers, right? So why is this problem that the paper responds to is never explicit in the text by the authors? Would not that be an important thing since it would save time for other mathematicians not to waste time formulating problems that have already been answered? Or is an expert in the field able to identify the open problem that a particular paper responds to even if it is not explicit in the text? Could someone explain to me in detail how this works?

More than one math Ph.D. program I am applying to has a section where I am to list relevant coursework. An example is as follows:

“Enter under each category list the two most advanced courses or course sequences you have had or will definitely take before you come to (School).”

Under each class title there is a blank line where I am to list a text or textbooks. (No other instruction)

My question is this: In a few of my courses, the professor has listed a textbook for the course, but whose lectures have not adhered to the structure or level of rigor of the book. The homework also did not come from the course book. If I chose to use another textbook to study out of should I list this one or the one listed in the course syllabus? My reasons for wanting to list the book I used are:

  1. The book on the syllabus is not a good indication of the level of rigor at which the course was taught.

  2. I haven’t read a page of the textbook on the syllabus while the book I used is one I own and is the primary reference for the subject on my shelf.

Which book should I write in my application?

pretty new to this site, I hope this hasn’t been asked before (I checked and found a somewhat similar question but not exactly this one) so I apologize if it is in fact a duplicate.

As the title states, I’m considering pursuing a Doctorate in Mathematics after I graduate Physics. It’s something I’m just thinking about and by no means do I plan on definitely doing it; however, a chance does exist. Is such a thing possible though? Do I need to first get a graduate in mathematics or? Over the course of the previous four years, I enrolled in classes like Abstract Algebra, Vector Spaces, Group Theory, Number Theory and similar and I enjoyed each and everyone whereas I encounter daily disappointments in most fields of Theoretical Physics.

Any kind of advice will be greatly appreciated, thanks!

I’m a sophomore in US college majoring in mathematics. I plan to apply for math PhD. I’m wondering how bad does the major GPA need to be for giving explanation? For example, do we need to provide explanations for a single A- out of straight-A’s?

Also, factors to take into account also include core courses (real analysis, abstract algebra, topology, etc.) vs. electives (combinatorics, number theory, probability, etc.), other courses taking along together e.g. 2 major classes in a semester vs. 4 major classes in a semester.

I am about to finish my Liberal Art and Sciences bachelors in Utrecht, the Netherlands. Though I really recommend UCU to anyone, they do not offer a great mathematics track. After completing it, I find myself lacking basic knowledge of mathematics. This is troubling as I was to study a mathematical masters (hopefully one the Logic masters in Amsterdam).
So I want to do a one-year Pre-master in Mathematics (not a full 3-year bachelor program). My question is whether anyone knows of such a program, preferably outside of the Netherlands. UU (Utrecht University) offers one, but I have lived too long in Utrecht.

I am grateful for any help.

I am a college freshman in India and am looking to something math related in the summer of 2018(end of first year). I would like to do something research oriented. I have presently done a course in Calculus(multivariable) and am presently doing courses in Linear Algebra, Combinatorial Theory and Game theory from edX and Coursera.

Could anyone please suggest some programs(preferably in the States or Europe) where i could apply? Or anything similar so that I could utilize my time in the summer? Thanks.