I am writing a paper and I have to include all the historical eras of Greece as a pre-defined “vocabulary” for a metadata schema. This vocabulary has to be online and be accessible via a URL.

So I am searching for a URL that contains all the historical eras of Greece in a format like “era name” – “date started” – “date ended”.

I cannot find a valid source. I want the source to be official. I used lots of keywords, Googling but nothing worthy except wikipedia. Can you suggest anything more official and trustworthy?

Thanks

Do any of you have an active web of science account?

The thing is that I do not have access to the “journal citation reports” section and I need to download the JCR SCI and JCR SSCI files from 2008 to 2016.
Journal Citation Reports Download

I searched the internet, but I only found the ones from 2015, in this link https://www.researchgate.net/post/How_can_I_find_the_list_of_Impact_Factor_20152/2

And there are other files as PDF, but they do not contain the ISSN and the quartile of the journal, which is what I need.

I would like to download a database containing all scientific papers published. This is obviously too broad and ambitious. To be realistic, say I want all the papers searchable on google scholar (although other databases are fine, say SemanticScholar, etc.), or an approximation of that. What databases out there allow you to download this data?

I don’t want to download the papers themselves (that wouldn’t fit on my storage), just a record containing title, authors, journal (if it is not a book), year, and perhaps abstract.

Is this possible? How can I download a database like this, that I can browse and search offline?

I would like to download a database containing all scientific papers published. This is obviously too broad and ambitious. To be realistic, say I want all the papers searchable on google scholar (although other databases are fine, say SemanticScholar, etc.), or an approximation of that. What databases out there allow you to download this data?

I don’t want to download the papers themselves (that wouldn’t fit on my storage), just a record containing title, authors, journal (if it is not a book), year, and perhaps abstract.

Is this possible? How can I download a database like this, that I can browse and search offline?

I am a Master’s student so it’s safe to say that I’m new to the world of serious research academia. For a research project I would like to evaluate the spatial skills of a cohort of participants. After investigating available methods, I would like to use the Purdue Spatial Visualisation Test: Visualisation of Rotation or PSVT:R (Guay, 1977). All I need is a PDF of all the questions, and in a Google search I was able to find one (the first document returned, actually) but it is rather poor quality. Does anyone know how I can get my hands on a high quality copy of the test? Will I have to pay for it? Can my institution help?

While the Nobel laureates are announced each year, are there any online resources that list who was nominated?

In particular, I am asking the Academic side of Nobel prizes, especially in Chemistry, Economics, Literature, Physics, or Physiology-Medicine.

For example, Wikipedia says that Kazuhiko Nishijima (西島 和彦) was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1960 and 1961, but it is not clear where can we find the official/secondary information about other “short-list” nominees.

How could we correct the missing citation counts and the missing citing References in the adsabs.harvard?

For example, I find that other resources such as https://inspirehep.net/ that have much precise and better citation counts, while both the Google Scholar and adsabs.harvard misses some citation counts/missing citing References.


These three resources have their own advantages and disadvantages:

1) Google Scholar: Google scholar miss citations from arXiv (sometimes but not always).

2) adsabs.harvard: In principle, it counts everything in arXiv, but even if so, the bib format citations may be missing — perhaps it is the LaTex generating issue.

3) https://inspirehep.net, it only counts articles that are relevant to particle physics, high-energy theory, quantum field and string theory. It misses other disciplines such as Atomic-Molecule Optics or Condensed Matter physics.


I am happy to receive comments from experts working in all disciplines.

When the Nobel prizes are announced, we can find the names of Nobel prize recipients/laureate. Are there online resources that we can find the list of people who are nominated as strong candidates for Nobel prizes, even though he/she may not win the prize in the end?

In particular, I am asking the Academic side of Nobel prizes, especially in the Chemistry, Economics, Literature, Physics, or Physiology-Medicine.

For example, it is said that Kazuhiko Nishijima 西島 和彦 is nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1960 and 1961 in Wikipedia, but it is not clear where can we find the official/secondary information about the nominees who are strong candidates.

During my PhD, I wrote a couple papers referencing and using a set of notes available online, which constitute(d) the draft of a textbook (and laid down techniques and lemmata I used). [1]

Now, I am in the process of writing my thesis, and noticed that this online resource (originally title Asymptopia) had disappeared from the website of the author, which now states:

A few years ago I decided I might actually finish if I split the
Asymptopia manuscript into two parts. Currently I am working on the
empirical process bit, which has acquired the temporary working title
MiniEmpirical. Some chapters have reached a reasonably complete form.
Those chapters are in the Mini subdirectory.

Of course, this is entirely up to the author, and I have nothing to argue against this. But that does put me in a bit of a pickle, as I don’t know of any equivalent resource to cite (the exposition of the techniques was both very clear, and adapted to what I am using). I personally have a pdf copy of this resource which I saved before it disappeared, but—of course—it is not up to me to make it available.

What is the correct way to handle this? Cite the previous draft as if it were still there, possibly with a relevant link to a cached version? Something else?

[1] Bibtex entry:

@misc{Pollard:2003,
author = {Pollard, David},
title = {Asymptopia},
howpublished = {url{http://www.stat.yale.edu/~pollard/Books/Asymptopia}},
note = {Manuscript},
year = 2003
}

I’ve found some source code that creates a visualization I like. I’ve (slightly) modified it and used exclusively my own data in it. Is it right to cite the github repository I acquired the original code from? I don’t want to be improper or misleading at all, but then it’s not normal to cite matplotlib, say, which this doesn’t feel much different to (except it’s code from a single author) so I’m unsure on correct procedure. I’m trying not to inflate the word count unnecessarily or give the false impression that the data is someone else’s (which I’m worried citing the code might do) – but equally I don’t want to give off any false impressions of authorship on my part.

Edit: To clarify I’m not distrusting the code at all, I’m just using it to generate a figure in my paper.