On my book there is the following reference:

Buckles, R. G., 1966, Analysis of gas exchange in a membrane oxygenator, Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

I tried to find it online:

https://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/7582/browse?rpp=20&order=ASC&sort_by=1&etal=-1&type=title&starts_with=A

http://library.mit.edu/F/XQ39BH41Q8C9V3XHXK5XA7EMFR5V5R9QDNSCKDFTNN4JNSS2SF-02835?func=find-b&find_code=WRD&request=Analysis+of+gas+exchange+in+a+membrane+oxygenator )

but without success.
Can you show me where I can find it please?

Thank you so much for your time.

In an upcoming publication, I need to link to the data I used for the publication so that others can see/use the data as well — both for reviewing the given work and also for intended use in the future. However, my institution has not offered any hosting solutions and I have not (yet) found any acceptable external solutions which absolve me of financial and legal responsibility for maintaining the data and the hosting infrastructure. I will not be at the given institution for very much longer, so e.g. putting it on my personal site at the institution is not a solution. The primary data in question is about 12GB in size, so it needs to be a proper “repository” for the data rather than just e.g. an attachment distributed with the publication itself.

Nevertheless, I need to at least have a stable link to some place where the data can be located; The stability of the actual location is not as important as the stability of the link itself. How/where can I procure a permanent URL to link to research data in a publication which does not cost me anything as an individual?

A full graduate level course is publicly uploaded as a series of videos on Youtube. Within the housekeeping section at the beginning of the course, the professor provides an email address as a means to contact him with questions. No attempt is made to obscure this email address when the video is later uploaded.

Obviously, the professor’s primary intent was for members of the class to have a way of contact, but would it be within the bounds of etiquette for a Youtube viewer following the course to email a question about the course material? Suppose the question is of a sort that would not be well suited to ask in a Youtube comment. Perhaps the question is long and includes images for clarification, but let’s assume that the answer would not be proportionally long, that the professor could answer it fairly quickly and easily. Would it be okay for a Youtube viewer not enrolled in the course (perhaps after the course had ended) to send such a question to the professor, maybe with the qualification, “Please do not feel compelled to take time out of your busy schedule to answer this, but I was watching your lectures on YT and was wondering…”?

I’m trying to create an online survey where the participant hears a series of sound files and rates each of them on a likert scale.

The sound files each depend on two variables and there is one file for each combination:
e.g. If the two variable can take the values [A, B, C] and [1, 2, 3] respectively then there would be 9 possible sound files:
A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, B3, C1, C2, C3.

I want each participant to hear an example of each variable exactly once.
e.g.
A2, C3, B1 and B2, A1, C3 are both valid series of sounds (no letters or numbers are repeated)
but
C1, C2, A3 and A3, C1, B3 are not valid series (a letter or number has been repeated).

[In my case I have 10 values of each random variable, 100 sound files].

I’ve tried Qualtrics and REDCap but cannot see how to do this sort of randomization.
Is there an online survey creation tool that supports this functionality?
or failing that, can anyone explain how to to this in Qualtics/REDCap?

[Apologies if this is not the correct place for this question, feel free to move it somewhere more appropriate]

I am writing a paper and I have to include all the historical eras of Greece as a pre-defined “vocabulary” for a metadata schema. This vocabulary has to be online and be accessible via a URL.

So I am searching for a URL that contains all the historical eras of Greece in a format like “era name” – “date started” – “date ended”.

I cannot find a valid source. I want the source to be official. I used lots of keywords, Googling but nothing worthy except wikipedia. Can you suggest anything more official and trustworthy?

Thanks

Do any of you have an active web of science account?

The thing is that I do not have access to the “journal citation reports” section and I need to download the JCR SCI and JCR SSCI files from 2008 to 2016.
Journal Citation Reports Download

I searched the internet, but I only found the ones from 2015, in this link https://www.researchgate.net/post/How_can_I_find_the_list_of_Impact_Factor_20152/2

And there are other files as PDF, but they do not contain the ISSN and the quartile of the journal, which is what I need.

I would like to download a database containing all scientific papers published. This is obviously too broad and ambitious. To be realistic, say I want all the papers searchable on google scholar (although other databases are fine, say SemanticScholar, etc.), or an approximation of that. What databases out there allow you to download this data?

I don’t want to download the papers themselves (that wouldn’t fit on my storage), just a record containing title, authors, journal (if it is not a book), year, and perhaps abstract.

Is this possible? How can I download a database like this, that I can browse and search offline?

I would like to download a database containing all scientific papers published. This is obviously too broad and ambitious. To be realistic, say I want all the papers searchable on google scholar (although other databases are fine, say SemanticScholar, etc.), or an approximation of that. What databases out there allow you to download this data?

I don’t want to download the papers themselves (that wouldn’t fit on my storage), just a record containing title, authors, journal (if it is not a book), year, and perhaps abstract.

Is this possible? How can I download a database like this, that I can browse and search offline?

I am a Master’s student so it’s safe to say that I’m new to the world of serious research academia. For a research project I would like to evaluate the spatial skills of a cohort of participants. After investigating available methods, I would like to use the Purdue Spatial Visualisation Test: Visualisation of Rotation or PSVT:R (Guay, 1977). All I need is a PDF of all the questions, and in a Google search I was able to find one (the first document returned, actually) but it is rather poor quality. Does anyone know how I can get my hands on a high quality copy of the test? Will I have to pay for it? Can my institution help?