Say I have three names viz… Firstname Middlename Surname. My first name is quite long. My supervisor is requesting that I only use my Middle and Surnames. This occured with my first manuscript with him (he has two short names). Although, I have one publication (with my full three names) before studying under my current supervisor, I have tried to do this. My ORCID account contains the three names. IEEE membership name emphasizes my Firstname and Surname. My question is if I would like to use only my Middle and Surnames now, what are the things I must do and precautions to take to ensure consistency and avoid complications in the future.

I’m trying to fill application forms for colleges in the USA. The last name field is mandatory. My last name field in my passport is empty and all these websites say fill according to passport, but as you can see I can’t do that here. The DS-160 FAQs say that in this case I should fill my first name as ‘FNU’ and my last name with my full given name, ‘Arjun Mohan’

Is this the protocol to follow?

It is generally expected that European names be spelled correctly in academic correspondence and citations. This is expected, even when they use symbols not in the English language, when publishing in English (provided that a modern typesetting system will support it).

For instance, the German name “Müller” is expected to be spelled correctly, even though it could be spelled “Mueller” in the English Alphabet (without loss of information). Similarly, Gaelic names such as “Ó Ceallaigh” would not be Anglicised, despite a long history of this having been done before.

However, this is not the case for Asian languages, even Japanese names where they do not typically have the culture of adopting a nickname in Western Countries. For example, “田中” would be spelled as “Tanaka” to confirm with English language readers, despite Japan having it’s own phonetic conventions to give the desired reading (e.g., “タナカ”).

For a more comparable example, why is it ok to spell “Tokyo” in English when “Muller” is incorrect. The correct romanisation of 東京 is Tōkyō. Yet this is not used, nor is Toukyou or とうきょう which would both be more accurate. This misspelling occurs for names of people in Asian languages as well as names of places.

It’s typically argued that this is because English-speaking audiences could not read Japanese names in their writing system but the same could be said for the umlaut, which is often mispronounced or misused (e.g., Mötley Crüe). With digital typesetting systems, would be entirely possible to spell “田中” correctly in a citation, even by someone who cannot understand the meaning, just as we do for diacritics for European names.

If spelling someone’s name correctly is a matter of respect, when is it necessary to do so and why are there exceptions to this?

I am a fresh medical graduate. I worked with a professor who harassed me sexually. Unfortunately, I was afraid to talk and also a little bit confused because I was an international visiting student at that time. I did a great job in his lab before he did that. He wrote for me a great letter of recommendation at that time. After he started to be unprofessional, I decided to leave his lab.

Since then, I was surprised that he published the preliminary results of the research as conference abstracts without putting my name as a co-author. However, he stated in the LoR that I am an author, formulated the primary draft and helped in the lab experiments, data collection, and statistical analysis as well. I sent him an email to ask him about the papers’ progress but he did not reply.

My question is: Now I want to apply for a research fellowship and I am going to use his LoR. But he wrote my last name as my father’s name, not the family name that I usually use in my applications. I do not feel comfortable to send him an email. I do not know if it will be a problem if there is a difference between my last name in the application (Hassan) and what he wrote (Elkhalil). I also feel so bad when I found him published the papers in an international conference without mentioning my name and feel worse for not reporting him, deleting the message, and moving on to another lab.

I’m in the process of applying to graduate schools in U.S.A. and Canada as an international student and run into this issue:
The name displayed on my passport and national ID consists of first name, middle name, and family name. However, on my transcript, my family name is not shown. I presume that this makes a difference.
Some of the universities’ registration page has fields for former name(s) listed on previous records/certificates. Should I indicate the name on my transcript in the former name fields since it lacks the family name while the one on my passport has my family name?
In addition, should I make an affidavit letter to state that the name on the passport and the transcript belong to me?

About on how I ended with only my first name and middle name on my transcript:
In my country, as far as I know, the way the name is put on every academic record must be the same as the one on those preceding them. Also, it’s usual here to write the only the given name in full and either omit the surname or make an initial of it if the space permits since many ethnic groups here do not actually use family names. I have many friends at college who did not use their surnames for their records. Back to academic records, my name has been written without a surname in academic records since elementary school, when my dad did the application process.

I’m in the process of applying to graduate schools in U.S.A. and Canada as an international student and run into this issue:
The name displayed on my passport and national ID consist of first name, middle name, and family name. However, on my transcript my family name is not shown. I presume that this makes a difference.
Some of the universities’ registration page has fields for former name(s) listed on previous records/certificates. Should I indicate the name on my transcript in the former name fields since it lacks the family name while the one on my passport has family name?
In addition, should I make an affidavit letter to state that the name on the passport and the transcript belong to me?