I grew up with a nickname, and I prefer to be called as that. It is quite different from my first name. When I introduce myself I usually just use the nickname.

I plan to use my full name in publication, and I have published papers using the full name already.

My question is, how problematic is this choice? Should I try to change it? I would imagine someone not relating me to my papers/ not able to find me from the nickname.

I grew up with a nickname, and I prefer to be called as that. It is quite different from my first name. When I introduce myself I usually just use the nickname.

I plan to use my full name in publication, and I have published papers using the full name already.

My question is, how problematic is this choice? Should I try to change it? I would imagine someone not relating me to my papers/ not able to find me from the nickname.

I am a first year PhD student and I was recently working on reproducing some results from a paper which is still being reviewed. In the process I noted a number of issues with the paper which should be clarified or fixed. I have been asked how I would like my name to appear in the acknowledgements. My full legal name is Kristian Tyn-Kai Chung, but I do not ever use the name Kristian, I have always gone by Kai to everyone I know besides by mother and grandmother who call me Kristian (with a Norwegian pronounciation). Should I use my full name? First and last? Should I use Kai? Any suggestions appreciated.

When citing two articles from the same author using different initials, one should cite each article with the relevant initials, even if they are different. This is answered here.

But what about differences in the last name of the same author when referencing inline? Russian authors, for instance, must transliterate their names and there are sometimes inconsistencies in the way this is done. For example, E. Mashchenko writes his or her name E. Maschenko here (published 2015), but E. Mashchenko here (published 2013). Basic knowledge of Russian transliteration suggests that Мащенко is to be transliterated as Mashchenko, and that is indeed the spelling the author uses on Research Gate, suggesting that the Maschenko spelling is an error.

Yet, because the point of referencing is to make it easy for other researchers to find the sourced material, the literal spelling Maschenko should be preferred when citing Maschenko (2015). When citing both articles inline, which of the following would one write?

  • (Mashchenko, 2013; Maschenko, 2015)

    which would be correct, but misleading and strange because this is the same person.

  • (Mashchenko, 2013, 2015)

    which doesn’t adhere to the above standard.

Who decides if someone can author/co-author an academic article under a pseudonym, when you want to do so to hide your identity on Google but still want credit for it for your academic advancement?

Is it the PI, department, university, publisher, or something else, who decides if you could do this? Also is it illegal in any country?

And from looking at previous threads here, seems that you cannot pick a completely random name as a pseudonym; it usually has to be somehow tied to you in real life – your maiden name, adding your middle name, abbreviating John Smith into JSmith… things like that. Not much change.

So you can’t use names like “spongebob”? How about “JS” or “J” for John Smith?

Someone mentioned you could get your professor to write that you used a fake name in their letter of recommendation. Would they be willing to write “this person published a paper titled so-and-so under a pen name called “[insert a randomly made-up name here]”.”

I’m a recent PhD with a modest list of publications. A few weeks ago, I realized that the Google Scholar entries of all of my papers link to another author’s profile. For instance, when one of my articles appears in a search, my name “M Dogan” is underscored, and when you click on it, you go to this profile rather than my profile.

The issue of having a publication listed under multiple scholars’ profiles is common and people have asked about it before (such as here). Clearly, my name is identical to the other scholar’s name, and Google Scholar fails to distinguish between us. There are many people who turn on the option to automatically add new publications to their profile, so this person probably does that too. This is a well known issue, which still needs to be fixed, but I can live with that. The problem I have is, the entries for my papers all link to the incorrect profile, so people have no way of finding my profile through my papers (without realizing that the linked profile is wrong and separately looking up my name and affiliation).

I sent an email to scholar-support@google.com five weeks ago, and sent multiple emails later on to remind them, but have not had any response. I find it frustrating that a service with extremely little user support is so crucial for a young researcher’s career.

Is there a way to fix this which I’m missing? Or is there a way to contact Google in a more efficient way? I really don’t want to contact the other author and hope they’ll care, but is it the only way?

I have a two-word last name which gives as full name something like “Mike Adam Pince” (just an example) with “Mike” the first name and “Adam Pince” the last name (no middle name).

I have published few conference papers and I noted that Google scholar is referencing me (author’s name in the results) as “MA Pince” which I’m sure other people would do too.

Now that I’m writing a journal paper I’m thinking of adding a hyphen to my last name “Adam-Pince” to avoid any confusion with others authors.

I wonder what’s the common practice in such a situation.

Say I have three names viz… Firstname Middlename Surname. My first name is quite long. My supervisor is requesting that I only use my Middle and Surnames. This occured with my first manuscript with him (he has two short names). Although, I have one publication (with my full three names) before studying under my current supervisor, I have tried to do this. My ORCID account contains the three names. IEEE membership name emphasizes my Firstname and Surname. My question is if I would like to use only my Middle and Surnames now, what are the things I must do and precautions to take to ensure consistency and avoid complications in the future.