I spent a year with a Phd. supervisor. I am not happy from both aspects: relationship and academically. Is it ethical to change the supervisor? Should I explain the reasons for change in details to the prospective supervisor or just be brief? How to avoid getting the impression that the student is trouble-maker (if I explained details of problems) vs. avoid give the impression there is no real reasons for change or that the student is not serious enough (if I am brief)?

I am applying for a Ph.D. position in a university. Their system required me to fill in the conferences I attended.

I published my paper on one conference although I didn’t attend it personally for some reasons. My advisor went on my behalf. However, if I denied that I had attended that conference, the system doesn’t even allow me to upload my paper. I think the paper is an important proof of my research ability.
What should I do? Should I just pretend I attended it. I don’t even think they will really check about this thing.

The question is really an attempt to ask for help and advice from academic staff members, industrial research staff or anyone who has had personal experience with Post-doc job applications.

Obviously there are lots of websites that list post-doc positions, and some are dedicated just for that. However in reality these positions have a lot of hidden intricacies that might lead you down a path that has been a dead end for a long time. The applicant however learns about this just at the very end of the process.

This is somewhat frustrating since most of the people I know about looking for a postdoc are in the final stages of their PhD and really cannot afford to waste too much time on the wrong thing.

Some ideas that raise my concern into the straightforwardness of a postdoc application are:

  • Many Post-Doc positions are advertised just for the sake of advertising the position, however sometimes the successful candidate had been chosen already, even before the position was open !
  • A lot of advise I get is that i should contact the concerned Professor/person directly and not wait for a position to be open, being proactive
  • Some positions are just out of reach for fresh PhD graduates because other previous post-docs are also applying for the same position and so the competition becomes unfair

I am hoping that this question leads into real world, clear and effective advice for people looking to get a Post-doc position

I am currently pursuing a PhD in Biophysics at a pretty reputed program. I have a background in Physics and made the jump to Biophysics while applying for PhD programs hoping to focus on mathematical modelling. I’m currently working on a side-project that demands significant modelling efforts. However, my current advisers do not have much experience in this field. We naturally do not have any collaborators to provide us with experimental data to help me with the model.

In the process of working on this side project, I’ve been reading a lot of Non Linear Dynamics and am currently taking a course on the same. I’ve noticed that I appreciate these tools (mathematical and algorithmic) used in research more than the questions that my research asks. Lately I’ve been considering pursuing research in Non Linear Dynamics. At the same time I’ve lost interest in my current project mainly because my advisers or lab mates do not have any overlap with my work. There isn’t a potential lab in my program using non linear dynamics in their research, except for a few experimental groups. I have never enjoyed doing experiments in the past and am not keen on joining any of these groups.

I’m considering applying for a Master’s program (and quitting my PhD) with an emphasis on Non Linear Dynamics and Complex Systems to corroborate my knowledge of the field and get a better understanding of the topics I want to pursue in the future. I also hope to improve on my mathematical skills in the process.
The problem is, I’m currently 25. If I do apply for a Master’s program, I’d be starting my PhD by 28 and that would put me well behind my competitors for academic positions in this field in the future.
(i) Do I have a better option to pursue my interests (other than staying in academia in the long run)?

(ii) What are some programs that could help me make such transition?

(iii) Is it too late to make this change?

First off apologies if this is in the wrong section, I’m new to this site. I had a few questions regarding graduate school admissions, so I figured this would be the right place to ask.

Basically I’m in a dilemma. I’m currently wrapping up my bachelor in mathematics this semester, and was considering applying for schools this year. However my advisor recommended that if I want to get into a top 15 institution I should finish a masters first due to our school being relatively unknown. I have already taken his advice and started my masters in mathematics, and I should have that complete by next year’s application cycle. Now my question is will the masters make that big of a difference with regards to my application, or would I have been better off just applying to mid-tier schools this time around and save the tuition money/time?

The rest of my application looks roughly like this (so far at least):

Math B.A., Chemistry B.A., Math M.A.

UG GPA: 3.6 overall, 3.95 in math,

Grad GPA: 3.8 (so far)

I have done two research projects, one of which is in the works of getting published the other is ongoing and quite extensive in numerical analysis.

GRE/Subject GRE – Have yet to take, will do so soon.

Recommendation Letters: Two professors with degrees from top 15 schools, one of which I have taken many courses with and done research with. Also the chair of the department.

Thank you, and once again sorry if this is in the wrong section.

First off apologies if this is in the wrong section, I’m new to this site. I had a few questions regarding graduate school admissions, so I figured this would be the right place to ask.

Basically I’m in a dilemma. I’m currently wrapping up my bachelor in mathematics this semester, and was considering applying for schools this year. However my advisor recommended that if I want to get into a top 15 institution I should finish a masters first due to our school being relatively unknown. I have already taken his advice and started my masters in mathematics, and I should have that complete by next year’s application cycle. Now my question is will the masters make that big of a difference with regards to my application, or would I have been better off just applying to mid-tier schools this time around and save the tuition money/time?

The rest of my application looks roughly like this (so far at least):

Math B.A., Chemistry B.A., Math M.A.

UG GPA: 3.6 overall, 3.95 in math,

Grad GPA: 3.8 (so far)

I have done two research projects, one of which is in the works of getting published the other is ongoing and quite extensive in numerical analysis.

GRE/Subject GRE – Have yet to take, will do so soon.

Recommendation Letters: Two professors with degrees from top 15 schools, one of which I have taken many courses with and done research with. Also the chair of the department.

Thank you, and once again sorry if this is in the wrong section.

I have to give a presentation about progress in my PhD after the first six months. I am not sure what is expected from a PhD student at this stage. I have done mostly literature review and a few initial experiments with the existing technology.

I am planning to divide the presentation into different sections such as background/importance of the research work, problem that needs to be addressed and possible approaches.

It would be nice to get some ideas about such presentations.

Please bear me to introduce my background first before I state my question. I am a first year master student in Scientific Computing program focused on numerical analysis. Before this, my background is Civil Engineering, so my mathematics background is very weak, and I never had taken an analysis course.

The courses required in my current program of study are some numerical PDE courses, and some computer techniques courses. Since I want to apply for PhD in the future, so I thought I should take more math courses to make up for my weakness and win better chances for my future PhD application with some analysis courses on my transcript. So I selected an additional functional analysis course.

Now with more than one month in this course, I got some feedback about my performance: first homework is merely 83% and midterm is only 75%, which is obviously not good.

I need some suggestions on whether I should keep staying in this course or just drop it. The dilemma I am now facing is: (1) A functional analysis course in my transcript might look good for my PhD application (this is just what I thought, might be wrong), so I want to stay in this course. Putting more efforts, I think I can pass this course. (2) It’s possible that I could fail this course, then I would fail the program. Or I might not be able to pass 75% final score, then I would lose my funding. So I should drop this course. (3) If I drop this course now, there would be a ‘DR’ in my transcript, which I think might not look so good for my future PhD application.

Any suggestions? This is urgent, I need to decide before the drop date, which is very soon. Thank you for your time!

Please bear me to introduce my background first before I state my question. I am a first year master student in Scientific Computing program focused on numerical analysis. Before this, my background is Civil Engineering, so my mathematics background is very weak, and I never had taken an analysis course.

The courses required in my current program of study are some numerical PDE courses, and some computer techniques courses. Since I want to apply for PhD in the future, so I thought I should take more math courses to make up for my weakness and win better chances for my future PhD application with some analysis courses on my transcript. So I selected an additional functional analysis course.

Now with more than one month in this course, I got some feedback about my performance: first homework is merely 83% and midterm is only 75%, which is obviously not good.

I need some suggestions on whether I should keep staying in this course or just drop it. The dilemma I am now facing is: (1) A functional analysis course in my transcript might look good for my PhD application (this is just what I thought, might be wrong), so I want to stay in this course. Putting more efforts, I think I can pass this course. (2) It’s possible that I could fail this course, then I would fail the program. Or I might not be able to pass 75% final score, then I would lose my funding. So I should drop this course. (3) If I drop this course now, there would be a ‘DR’ in my transcript, which I think might not look so good for my future PhD application.

Any suggestions? This is urgent, I need to decide before the drop date, which is very soon. Thank you for your time!