I scored 880 ( 83 percentile ) on September 17 Physics GRE.

I am asking if you think I should retake the exam given that I am international students and I have read that the admission standards for international students are pretty high since the competition is really tough. I have read also somewhere that the average scores for international students range from 900-990 which means so I am below average, not very far I know but I have no considerable research experience and I am afraid this score won’t be a good point in my application and I was relying heavily on perfect score in the exam for my application to be taken seriously into consideration. So what do you think ?

Biophysics and Condensed matter physics interests me. I am more inclined towards biophysics.
Would it weaken my application if i applied to both the biophysics program (Biological sciences department) and the condensed matter program (Physics department) in the same university? I want to apply for Condensed matter, in case i didn’t get accepted in biophysics, i might get accepted in condensed matter.

P.S. I have a Bachelor’s degree in theoretical physics.

I recently graduated with a BA in physics. Towards the tail end of my undergrad career I took the Putnam exam (scored 28 w/o having taken any upper div math), and subsequently took a couple core math courses (one quarter of real analysis, one quarter of proof-based linear algebra). These were the probably the three most enjoyable learning experiences I’ve had in undergrad, and for the past month or so I’ve been trying to think about how I could possibly switch to a research career in mathematics but it seems very unfeasible due to the small amount of core classes I took and my inability to do any substantial math research both due to lack of knowledge and lack of faculty connections.

Right now I am taking a gap year working in a physics lab. I am technically able to audit more core math courses at my undergrad institution but wouldn’t reasonably be able to do more than two (maximum three) more. I could self-study but am worried about the lack of grades to reflect my learning (although I could take the math GRE and hope for the best). It’s my understanding that I’d need a strong foundation in analysis and algebra before being able to do any sort of meaningful research, so my hope is now to get into a master’s program where I could fill in my gaps and start working on research, but even these programs require a much more thorough foundation than what I’d be able to build on paper. Is there any way that I could switch to math at this point, with the goal of entering a math PhD program, or is my best bet to try to do theoretical physics and segway that into mathematical physics?

Thanks in advance for your time and answers.

I’m finishing my MSc degree next year in theoretical (mathematical) physics. This year however, I got into another MSc program at a different university in mathematics (theoretical PDE stuff, nothing numerical which might have been beneficial in finance and not really beneficial for what I do in physics). After completing my first degree I’m not looking to join a PhD program. Instead I’d rather get a job. I’m wondering if a second degree, the one in mathematics would really help me get a better job in quantitative finance or any job in fact? Is it worth it to study for one more extra year instead of getting work experience? Funding isn’t a problem (Higher education is free in my country).

I would really like to get opinion from someone who transitioned from MSc degree in physics to quantitative finance or did two similar degrees without doing a PhD.

I am currently pursuing my post-graduation in Physics. I would like to do my project work on computational physics . The problem is that I am not entirely sure how to go about it and what area I should choose within that subject.Anyone please suggest me..
Also I’m having a doubt ..Can I do project work in artificial neural modelling as a physics student?

Since I was young, I had a few dreams, well they were all connected to each other, but anyway, my dream was to become an astronaut, though not the kind you see in movies, that repair space stations and stuff like that.

As such I thought I should start small, and choose where to go to university to study this. (Currently I’m in Ireland, and I would like for the university to be here)

I want to learn more about the universe.

I would like to learn more about Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science, all at once, so that I can better understand how the universe works.

So far I couldn’t find the right subject that blends all of them for this purpose.

Could I perhaps get a starting point, what I should look for?

Thank you.

I’m a first year PhD student at a university in the USA. Still I haven’t finished my first semester. After I come here, I feel right now, I like a different research field (based on job application and doing empirical research). The problem is that, there is only two professors who do that type of research work in my department. One of the professor doesn’t have a good reputation doing research work and another one’s review is not good (I heard his from previous students. He is very rude sometimes, this scared me a lot). He is very furious if his students can’t satisfy his expectations. Therefore I don’t have wish to work under his supervision.

I have two options right now, 1. changing research field and 2. finding another university related to my research interest.

Please note that I have not taken the first qualifying exam and even my first semester core courses haven’t finished yet. The university gives the MS certificate if anyone satisfies the requirement of MS.

I have received suggestion from one of the PhD student which is: I should take the physics GRE to increase my score and apply this upcoming fall. If I get admission, I can inform the International office that I will leave.

This suggestion didn’t seem good to me because my department may take this in negative way, as I will require a recommendation letter.

What’s your suggestions in this case? Should I wait more and talk to the professors after my qualifying exam regarding my research interest.

I’m a first year PhD student at a university in the USA. Still I haven’t finished my first semester. After I come here, I feel right now, I like a different research field (based on job application and doing empirical research). The problem is that, there is only two professors who do that type of research work in my department. One of the professor doesn’t have a good reputation doing research work and another one’s review is not good (I heard his from previous students. He is very rude sometimes, this scared me a lot). He is very furious if his students can’t satisfy his expectations. Therefore I don’t have wish to work under his supervision.

I have two options right now, 1. changing research field and 2. finding another university related to my research interest.

Please note that I have not taken the first qualifying exam and even my first semester core courses haven’t finished yet. The university gives the MS certificate if anyone satisfies the requirement of MS.

I have received suggestion from one of the PhD student which is: I should take the physics GRE to increase my score and apply this upcoming fall. If I get admission, I can inform the International office that I will leave.

This suggestion didn’t seem good to me because my department may take this in negative way, as I will require a recommendation letter.

What’s your suggestions in this case? Should I wait more and talk to the professors after my qualifying exam regarding my research interest.

Quick background: I’ll be applying for PhD programs and most likely want to study theoretical condensed matter (though I’m open to other theoretical and mathematical fields). I find experimental physics alright, but it really doesn’t excite me.

I’ve heard that I should apply as if I’m pursuing an experimental physics track, though, because it’s less competitive, and then transition towards a theory group once admitted. Is this sound advice? It came from a rather respected source. Still, I am wary about misrepresenting myself and also concerned about getting stuck in a path that I don’t intend to be in.

Any insight into how admission committees handle the experimental/theory dichotomy would also be appreciated. Thanks.

Additional Info: I’m applying within the US as a citizen. I’m finishing a MS in physics at the moment.