Like can I skip studying Mathematica, python and still be missing only a little?
What I had in mind was to get MATLAB’s Mupad to do Mathematica’s jobs?
Also, since Python and MATLAB seem to basically have similar syntax, capabilities could one just know MATLAB and be able to do most of the things?

I felt that it would be better to know one software in detail rather than limited knowledge of many.

Steven Krantz’s book A Mathematician’s Survival Guide: Graduate School and Early Career Development has been mentioned in answers on this site. The book is full of good advice for graduate students in math in the U.S. and undergraduates who plan to apply to graduate schools.

I would like to know if any analogous guides have been written for graduate school in physics.

If I’m allowed, I’d like to ask exactly the same question for computer science.

Thank you.

I have completed my M.Sc. in Physics and have been working in a Quantum Optics Lab for over a year as a Research Assistant. I am no longer interested in that (in all of AMO, in fact).

I want to switch fields and go for Ph.D. in theoretical (HEP, Quantum Gravity, Physics beyond the standard model, etc. ) physics. I would like to pursue problems that are fundamental, but (preferably) still have strong roots in Physical reality.

What are my options for research areas and universities? Should I apply this year or try to work in a related research group as an intern and apply next year? I have no prior experience in any of those mentioned above, except for a reading course on cosmology during my M.Sc.

PS: I have missed most of the deadlines in the US because I realized this pretty late.

I recently received a 1st-year physics postdoc fellowship offer at a university in Canada for two to three years. The annual salary is 55,000 CAD (44,000 in USD). I haven’t worked in North America at all. I was just wondering how good this salary is.

I vaguely remember some new law-enforced minimum postdoc salary of 47,000 USD in the US. Does it mean it’s not that good? Any information will be greatly appreciated.

I recently received a 1st-year physics postdoc fellowship offer at a university in Canada for 2-3 years. The annual salary is 55,000 CAD (44000 in USD). I haven’t worked in North America at all. I was just wondering how this salary is.
Is there some minimum salary of 45000 USD in US? Does it mean it’s not that good? Any information will be greatly appreciated.

I am currently an undergraduate math major and have hopes of attending graduate school in applied math. I also have a love for physics and thinking of minoring in physics. After some research, I found that many departments have professors in the research area of mathematical physics. Is having a minor in physics a good background to pursue research at the graduate level in mathematical physics?

I am a student and I will hopefully start preparation for my A-level examinations this June. Unlike most students in Bangladesh, I plan to build my future based on Quantum Physics and thus have not received sufficient advise on what to do.

Edexcel offers many subjects for A-levels but I am unsure which ones do I need.
So far I am sure that I need:

  • Chemistry (All 5 units)
  • Physics (All 5 units)
  • Core Mathematics (All 4 papers)
  • Further Pure Mathematics (All 3 papers)
  • Mechanics (All 3 papers)

Generally students take 4 subjects and ignore some units or papers but to have a good preparation for what is coming ahead, I have planned to take 5 subjects and not miss out on any unit or paper. However I am unsure whether I need statistics or not. I have understood it plays an important part in Quantum Physics (Feynman diagrams for one) but am unsure if it is really that important or not (3 more papers).

Recently, my grandfather’s school friend came to visit. Despite being a geologist, he had sound knowledge of Quantum Physics (But not of the education system). He advised me to not drop Biology for my O-levels as it will play an important part in the ‘Theory of Everything’. I did decide to appear for Biology in my O-levels but should I also take it for my A-level examinations? (5 more units)

P.S. Each unit requires one paper so I may have to give 28 papers (generally people give 11 papers). If you want to learn more about A-levels click here.

This may seem like personal advice but it will actually help many more students out in the world who plan to make a career out of Quantum Physics. Any help would be appreciated!