When we are accepted in a poster session, does it mean that we need to provide a “poster” (usually in A0 size) + an “article” which explains the topic in a separate file ? Or both poster and article are included in a single PDF file ?

And also this article must include an “abstract” like usual papers?

I ask this question because I have received a strange email from a workshop as follows :

Posters have to be formatted in LNCS-style and not exceed 1 page in
length, with a PDF draft of the proposed poster included as page 2 of
the submission (A0 size in portrait mode, W 841mm x H 1189 mm, with
all fonts embedded in the PDF file). In addition, poster titles
should always start with the phrase “Poster Abstract:”

Here is the website of the conference : http://deic.uab.cat/conferences/cbt/cbt2018/

.

My paper has been accepted in poster session of a conference and in the email that I have received is mentioned that :

Posters have to be formatted in LNCS-style and not exceed 1 page in
length, with a PDF draft of the proposed poster included as page 2 of
the submission (A0 size in portrait mode, W 841mm x H 1189 mm, with
all fonts embedded in the PDF file).

It’s my first time that I want to participate in a poster session. I have worked with LNCS (Lecture Notes in Computer Science) format and it is strange to me that how can I design a poster using LNCS format ? Because this format is very limited for this purpose (consider for example: margins and the space remains for writing). You can see its style here: https://www.sharelatex.com/templates/journals/lecture-notes-in-computer-science-(lncs)

Here is the website of the conference : http://deic.uab.cat/conferences/cbt/cbt2018/

Is someone who has experience of designing a poster using LNCS format ?

Thanks

I am printing a poster for presenting at a conference. I would like to print on cloth so that I can carry it easily in the suitcase.

In many print shops I have to select which cloth exactly to print on. There are many kinds of clothes: satin, canvas, flag, net, etc…

Which material both allows a high printing resolution (so that the details are clearly visible), and remains good-looking after transporting it in a suitcase?

In a paper I am presenting, a key equation contains the term $1 / floor(n/k)$, where n and k are some integers. This term is quite cumbersome, so I thought that, when I present my paper in a poster or slides, it can be better to present it approximately as just $k/n$.

My questions:

  • Is it desirable to simplify equations in this way in slides or posters?
  • What is a simple way to convey the message that the equation is not entirely accurate?

When presenting a scientific poster at a conference, I am often asked by colleagues if they can get a copy of the poster. Often, I have DIN A4 prints ready (quite hard to read…) and I am also happy to share them via email, if somebody is interested.

It would all be much easier if I could just upload the poster to some open repository where it is archived such that I just need to share a link.

Neither arXiv seems to be the right place for it, nor figshare. Is there some open repository for scientific posters which I missed so far?

My colleague presented two separate posters, one at a domestic conference and another at an international conference, based on the work both of us have been collaborating for past 1.5 years.

Before submitting the abstract or the poster, they did not seek my approval. In fact, I was not aware of this until recently.

In the poster, they put themselves first in the author list and me as second. Apart from the fact that poster submission was not disclosed, the authorship order was not explicitly discussed.

In the poster, they included an elaborate set of their contact information, even (non-traditional in academic publishing) details such as tweet handle and other auxiliary information, when clearly there was space to include the rest of the authors information.

I am offended by this. I am not sure what the universally accepted academic code of conduct in such instances is?

I am a first year PhD student in Psychology and I messed up. I submitted an abstract for a poster presentation before I had results in my hand thinking I will have it all done in time for the actual presentation. My advisor was very encouraging. I started analyzing the data a week ago and I feel very lost. I have made some minor progress, but I don’t have a real “story” to say about my research, and I am worried its a dead end. I’m not sure what to do. How intense do poster presentations get? What does a bad poster presentation look like? Should I back out of the poster presentation? Or should I go ahead with it in the hopes that I find some minor interesting thing to say?