I am a PhD student and I’ll be giving my first talks at an international conference soon.

In the past I have had tough questions from the audience that I did not know the answer to, or did, but it didn’t come to mind until after the talk.

I have also had occassions where I hadn’t heard the questioner twice, after repeating, and I couldn’t ask for a third time (I am a bit deaf). As a result, I responded with an answer to a question that might have been asked, which was sort of a gamble.

I am curious, how do people best deal with these situations during talks? are there any ‘formulas’ of how to deal with this? what methods do people use to relax during question time?

I have been invited to an University to make a presentation. Main focus is to share my works with the faculties and attract for possible collaborations with them. I am wondering a step or slide where can to convey my interests for possible collaborations? What should be the context of that slide?

Any suggestions or help will be highly appreciated.

I have been invited to an University to make a presentation. Main focus is to share my works with the faculties and attract for possible collaborations with them. I am wondering a step or slide where can to convey my interests for possible collaborations? What should be the context of that slide?

Any suggestions or help will be highly appreciated.

As a session chair recently, I was to introduce a talk where the title of the talk was ungrammatical (in both the abstract and talk slides), likely due to the presenter not being a native English speaker. Two words should have been in plural when they were not, which became clear after reading the abstract.

I faced a dilemma:

  1. read the corrected title, and possibly embarrass the speaker (possibly putting them off their talk), or

  2. deliberately read the ungrammatical title.

I attempted a compromise: I acted casual, as if I wasn’t reading the title word for word.

Question: How should the session chair introduce presentation titles which are ungrammatical?

I’m just wondering what’s the best solution in this situation (or perhaps what I did “on the fly” was the best).

Computer science conferences these days often ask authors to make short videos based on their papers. The short ones might be 30 secs in length. The longer ones might be about 5 min long.

These videos, if made well, can attract people to your talk during the conference, and also serve as a great introduction to your paper for future readers after the conference.

I’d appreciate some tips and advice on how to make these videos good. If you have a favorite example of such videos, I’d love to see it too!

Computer science conferences these days often ask authors to make short videos based on their papers. The short ones might be 30 secs in length. The longer ones might be about 5 min long.

These videos, if made well, can attract people to your talk during the conference, and also serve as a great introduction to your paper for future readers after the conference.

I’d appreciate some tips and advice on how to make these videos good.

I have just earned an MA degree in a social science field. I’m planning to apply to American PhD programs (sociology). I’m from a developing country, and my university is quite modest, if not godforsaken, no extracurricular activities, no interest in research. My CV is quite empty. All I have is the B.A. and M.A. degrees (I’m ranked first in both of them, if it matters), plus a B.A. thesis and an M.A. one; both of which are, I believe, worthy of publication.

I used to jump at every class presentation opportunity in my B.a. and M.A., sometimes in front of more than 100 classmates, at other times around twenty (M.A.). Sometimes, I used to spend half of the session presenting and leading the discussion, sometimes the whole two-hour session.

Is it appropriate to list these presentations (+10)? If so, in what format?