I think that I am pretty good at presenting my work during my PhD, and I am still being invited to conferences for the some papers I did 2 years ago.

Now, I am working in industry. My manager always complains about my presentations and my reports.

I tried my best to follow his guidelines, but still he does not understand my presentations.

What might be the expectations in the industry different than the academia in terms of presenting some work?

I am excellent at presenting work I did in my Ph.D., and still being invited to conferences for the some papers I did 2 years ago.
But, as I am working in industry, my manager claims he does not understand my presentations neither my reports. My presentations are always beside the point in his opinion. I tried my best to follow his guidelines, but still he does not understand my presentations. What would you recommend in such a case?

I apologize if this isn’t the correct site for this. I am currently planning a presentation for an international conference of college students. The presentation is being given by four to-be teachers to to-be teachers. The topic is service. I wanted to do something new and interactive instead of a PowerPoint. Any suggestions?

I used some screenshots from academic published papers (e.g. figures) in my presentation that I gave to a group of colleagues. The screenshots were used as examples of how you should or should not do certain analyses or present certain results.

As my examples concerned screenshots of figures or tables from published paper these fall under copyright. The copyright is usually held by the editors/publishing companies. The papers/sources are correctly referenced on the respective slide of my presentation that contain the screenshots.

Still my question is whether it is legal to publish (e.g. make online available) the slides on which the screenshots are given or would this infringe copyright? In other words: do I have to delete the respective slides before spreading my talk?

I am a beginning graduate student in mathematics. My university holds regular seminars in different areas of mathematics, and I try to attend all of them. I like getting exposed to different areas of research I did not know of, and get updated about recent developments. Listening to different speakers on different areas of mathematical research has greatly helped me become more confident in approaching new areas with new thoughts.

Often the researchers pose open problems. I note those down and after returning home, I try to read up about them but usually I find there are lots and lots of background material to cover and certainly I would have to spend a lot of time reading things up to get to the point where the speaker leaves something as an open problem. Please note I am a beginning graduate student.

Even if open problems have not been directly posed, following the speaker’s work may eventually lead me to solve related problems in the area. Unfortunately the time taken scares me and essentially those notes get lost.

I am not even sure if the system I am following is proper. How does one get the most out of seminars? Or, what message is a seminar really intended to convey? Just a demonstration of some work done by the speaker, to be validated (at least at face value) by the audience? Or expose the audience to areas they can work on? In the latter case, how does one keep track of all the information obtained from seminars? A disciplined approach would be solicited.

I am exciting to share our preliminary results. I also want to demonstrate productivity, so I’m wrestling with the idea of presenting findings in presentation and poster format at an upcoming conference. The research is in health care. However, our big journals typically don’t publish papers on data that has been published or presented elsewhere. I’m looking for any advice on navigating journal requirements such as:

Resuscitation:

The paper should deal with original material, neither
previously published nor being considered for publication elsewhere,
except in special circumstances agreed with the Editor-in-Chief.

Annals of Emergency Medicine:

Annals publishes only original work in
accordance with the ICMJE policy on overlapping publications. If your
manuscript or data, in whole or part, has been published elsewhere, or
has been or will be submitted for publication elsewhere, this may
constitute unacceptable prior and/or duplicate publication. Should
there be any doubt, please detail the specific circumstances to us in
your cover letter. Failure to do so could be interpreted as deliberate
duplicate publication.

What would people think if we published secondary outcomes and answered a different research question than the research manuscript we intend to ultimately publish? Thoughts?

I am exciting to share our preliminary results. I also want to demonstrate productivity, so I’m wrestling with the idea of presenting findings in presentation and poster format at an upcoming conference. The research is in health care. However, our big journals typically don’t publish papers on data that has been published or presented elsewhere. I’m looking for any advice on navigating journal requirements such as:

Resuscitation:

The paper should deal with original material, neither
previously published nor being considered for publication elsewhere,
except in special circumstances agreed with the Editor-in-Chief.

Annals of Emergency Medicine:

Annals publishes only original work in
accordance with the ICMJE policy on overlapping publications. If your
manuscript or data, in whole or part, has been published elsewhere, or
has been or will be submitted for publication elsewhere, this may
constitute unacceptable prior and/or duplicate publication. Should
there be any doubt, please detail the specific circumstances to us in
your cover letter. Failure to do so could be interpreted as deliberate
duplicate publication.

What would people think if we published secondary outcomes and answered a different research question than the research manuscript we intend to ultimately publish? Thoughts?

I am exciting to share our preliminary results. I also want to demonstrate productivity, so I’m wrestling with the idea of presenting findings in presentation and poster format at an upcoming conference. The research is in health care. However, our big journals typically don’t publish papers on data that has been published or presented elsewhere. I’m looking for any advice on navigating journal requirements such as:

Resuscitation: The paper should deal with original material, neither previously published nor being considered for publication elsewhere, except in special circumstances agreed with the Editor-in-Chief.

Annals of Emergency Medicine: Annals publishes only original work in accordance with the ICMJE policy on overlapping publications. If your manuscript or data, in whole or part, has been published elsewhere, or has been or will be submitted for publication elsewhere, this may constitute unacceptable prior and/or duplicate publication. Should there be any doubt, please detail the specific circumstances to us in your cover letter. Failure to do so could be interpreted as deliberate duplicate publication.

What would people think if we published secondary outcomes and answered a different research question than the research manuscript we intend to ultimately publish? Thoughts?

Thank you!

As part of the interview process I have to do a 20 min. presentation of my recent research, my research strategy and my future plan. So far in my past interviews I was asked to only do a teaching presentation, so that’s a bit new to me. Do you know any good resources/samples on how to approach such presentations?

I have the following question to be useful, but a bit short:

Should I give an overview of my research program at the beginning or at the end of my job talk?

It’d be actually nice if someone has presentation samples from successful candidates