I don’t know if my question is relevant to this forum but I’ll try to ask it hopingly.

I’m a senior bachelor’s student in Computer Engineering. Before entering university I was so interested in Psychology and I still am. In fact, I’m so interested in cognitive sciences.

I do love my current field of study, but my background in mathematics is not that good to allow me to work on currently open challenges in Computer Science. I mostly consider Computer Engineering as part of my business career rather than research field, as I’m fairly good at professional skills a regular computer engineer should have to get a fairly good job.

But, I am very enthusiastic about management and mostly Human Resources Management. More precisely, I’d love to research around subjects like Talent Management, Productivity, Motivation, Organizational Structures, agility, learning organizations and HR training.

I guess I’d better studied Industrial Engineering and just learned software development on my own.

Now I’m applying for Master of Information Technology Engineering, which is a combination of Computer Engineering and IT management. The reason I’m choosing this is that there’s a better chance for me to be accepted in the entrance exam because the exam provisions are 90% from what I have studied in bachelor’s degree.

I always feel uncertain about my choices.

What do you recommend? please advise.

Thanks

I am a PhD student mid stage, working on computational aspects of mathematics. I am working on a research problem with my supervisor. I am at a stage where I can’t take much help from the supervisor because I am in the fourth year. I can’t do something like going to supervisors office to verify my answers. I did these things in the initial years of my PhD, but now I can’t poke my supervisor that often.

I am facing a difficulty that how to come with something non-trivial on myself. The problem with me is that I go into wrong directions many times, and in the past I have spent many days, weeks, or longer on these wrong directions. I want to minimise the number of these trials and failures. Does it come with age?

Question: Is there any way to pick a right direction (which yields a paper) in research while solving a problem? I can take the help of my research supervisor once in two weeks. However, many times a day or week, I also need to discard some of the possible directions of research.

I am in an extremely stressed out situation right now. I am pursuing Mathematical Sciences, as of now. I experience absolutely no difficulty in understanding the motivation or meaning underlying the several concepts and ideas one is taught in undergraduate courses. I am taking a few advanced and graduate courses as well and recently obtained a scholarship to pursue a research project.

I am extremely enthusiastic regarding what I do and I really love and have a passion for mathematics.

But the major problem I am facing right now is that I find myself incompetent in writing proofs in flawless rigour. I figure out the solution to any assigned problem as a rough intuitive idea, which in almost all cases is the underlying idea behind an elegant solution to the given problem. But once I can “see” the solution, I can no longer formulate it into a standard rigorous proof and this incompetence is hurting me severely in every step in “my career of exploration “.
As a result, though I find that I can solve almost every problem assigned to me (provided I am given time to ponder over it), however hard they might seem to be, still I feel I lack the skill to formulate it into a perfect solution.

I am passing through an extremely depressing phase of my life and I would be highly indebted to anyone who lends me a helping hand in this regard.
You can suggest me any literature to study, any class or lecture to attend or anything else that you feel would be beneficial for me.

I am currently in a problem-solving mode of my PhD (theory, middle stage). I am working on something which is incremental on the last half a year. Until now, I did not get anything non-trivial. I noticed that I have become slow as compared to the initial two years of my PhD.

I am wondering how to speed up my research. I have tried to scan as many papers as possible. I am also trying to discuss my research problem with other students, but it is not working.

Question: Is it natural that you become slower in the middle of your PhD? How can I speed up my research?

I’m a Physics PhD student in a US university who qualified for the PhD level and waiting for the comprehensive test.

In the first year of my PhD, I wasn’t able to cope up with the pressure and that caused bad grades. The result from first and second semester is below:

A, B-, B ; A, B, B+.

In the second year, I eventually understood the pressure and was able to cope up the coursework pressure along with the research pressure. And, eventually I did well in the second year. My result is:

A, A, B+ ; A+, A+, A

My question is how bad influence will my overall score appear to the academia and industry?

NOTE: My supervisor is pretty happy with my research work.

I got a scholarship offer which requires me to work for a financial institution for three days (24 hours) a week. The scholarship is quite generous (50k AUD per year). Is it worth it to take it if I don’t have to take the responsibility of TA and RA? I am just afraid it will influence my academic performance during my PhD life. After all, I take a PhD for making myself have a position in the academia world. If my publication record will be influenced by the three-day work, I’d rather not take this scholarship and turn to self-fund(I don’t have any other scholarship). Can someone who has already experienced a PhD life help me estimate the pros and cons of this scholarship?

To preface, I imagine this might come off really immature, given that I am 30 years old. I joined a university as a PostDoc after completing my PhD 6 months ago. I am yet to publish anything after joining here, I have been feeling burnt out and disorganised. I was planning to join the industry within a year of joining (It was initially envisaged as a one-year contract, but it got extended for three more years, due to my professor getting new funding, but that’s beside the point). My professor is very understanding, and he is very motivated. His team is getting into theoretical machine learning and the papers he published are already making strides and catching everyone’s attention.

I, on the other hand, am just starting in the area of data science. I am an average coder, and my math skills are also pretty average. If I work hard I can crank out some papers ( that is how I finished my PhD), but lately I have been feeling very unmotivated and distracted. I have a few family problems (I am gay from a conservative family), but that is no excuse for not being motivated, I know. I tried out to be a data scientist at an internet advertising firm but was rejected after the on-site interview following a Skype interview, the reason being that my practical skills were not on par (I did a mainly theoretical PhD, and my knowledge of practical algorithms is lacking).

On the other hand, my colleague who is a PhD student under my prof (only 25!) has been publishing and his works on machine learning (also theoretical), have been attracting researchers from companies like Facebook and Google, at a recent conference. As for me, the very idea of going to a conference again gives me shudders.

I am out of ideas and out of steam to be honest, but I really want to create pathbreaking research and join a top company to start my career as a data scientist. But I feel lost.

To have a good CV for an eventual job hunt, I need at least one good publication during this year of my post-doc but all the work I have done have led me nowhere to be honest.

For context: I did my PhD on random graph analysis.

I really need some guidance. I know I should have figured this out already given I am a 30 year old graduate, but unfortunately I haven’t. I can blame that on my depression, but how long can I do that for? Anybody who has been in the same situation as me? Any input is welcome.

I initially posted this on workplace.se, but was told to come here. Please let me know if this is the wrong place for this kind of stuff, and I will take it down.

To preface, I imagine this might come off really immature, given that I am 30 years old. I joined a university as a PostDoc after completing my PhD 6 months ago. I am yet to publish anything after joining here, I have been feeling burnt out and disorganised. I was planning to join the industry within a year of joining (It was initially envisaged as a one year contract, but it got extended for 3 more years, due to my professor getting new funding, but that’s beside the point). My professor is very understanding, and he is very motivated. His team is getting into theoretical machine learning and the papers he published are already making strides and catching everyone’s attention.

I, on the other hand, am just starting in the area of datascience. I am an average coder, and my math skills are also pretty average. If I work hard I can crank out some papers ( that is how I finished my PhD), but lately I have been feeling very unmotivated and distracted. I have a few family problems (I am gay from a conservative family), but that is no excuse for not being motivated, I know. I tried out to be a Datascientist at an internet advertising firm but was rejected after the on-site interview following a Skype interview, the reason being that my practical skills were not on par (I did a mainly theoretical PhD, and my knowledge of practical algos is lacking).

On the other hand my colleague who is a PhD student under my prof (only 25!) has been publishing and his works on machine learning (also theoretical), have been attracting researchers from companies like Facebook and Google, at a recent conference. As for me, the very idea of going to a conference again gives me shudders.

I am out of ideas and out of steam to be honest, but I really want to create pathbreaking research and join a top company to start my career as a datascientist. But I feel lost.

To have a good CV for an eventual job hunt, I need at least one good publication during this year of my post-doc but all the work I have done have led me nowhere to be honest.

For context: I did my PhD on random graph analysis.

I really need some guidance. I know I should have figured this out already given I am a 30 year old graduate, but unfortunately I haven’t. I can blame that on my depression, but how long can I do that for? Anybody who has been in the same situation as me? Any input is welcome.

I’m PhD student and I’ll be graduating in May (next year). I’ve been getting into discipline-based educational research (DBER), including developing tools, running projects, a paper or two, and applying to grants. I do this in addition to my standard research. My DBER work is almost exclusively applications of what I develop in my (primary) research (quantitative biology).

My goal is a TT job in the future. Would this be considered as general research productivity, or mark me as primarily an educator?

I am a PhD student in computer science (theory). I am worried about my productivity. I try to do as much as possible. I used to take four courses per semester during my first two years of studying. Now I have started doing research. In the last 4 months, I have only read 2-3 proofs and one research paper. It took 2-3 weeks to go over each mathematical proof.

Question: How do I know I have done enough work in one semester? I mean is there any parameter to measure the work that I have done in the last semester? I have heard some students read only one research paper per one semester.

I can get feedback from my research supervisor, but the problem is he might say I did enough work just to keep my motivation high.