I have a £1000 of funding that I can use for my research or teaching. I have bought a few books with it, but I have no other immediate necessity (conference trips etc). I do not like the budget to lapse (by the end of this July) and I am afraid I may have looked past some potential benefits I could have gained using the budget.

What are some possible ways for me to make use of this sum in this limited time?

I have read about many great researchers in various fields who were not involved in academia throughout their lives. Some were involved in academia only part of their life, but almost invariably, their greatest work came after a period of solitude and isolation from others. In fact, most great mathematicians, for example, were rather isolated figures. Bernhard Riemann and Isaac Newton come to mind, but others like James Clerk Maxwell were also isolated during their periods of research. More recently, Andrew Wiles isolated himself for around 7 years and didn’t speak about his work to anyone while he was busy solving Fermat’s Last Theorem. (I have mentioned only mathematicians because those are the ones I have read about the most.)

Hence, I am failing to see how being in academia/a university position aids one as a researcher, practically speaking. It seems as though the greatest research must come from within the individual due to an intense and personal love and desire for the subject, rather than due to collaborating with others or being given a better position or whatever. In fact, such things seem to be the opposite: detrimental. They would make the person focus not on the subject but on paltry things like gaining more and more money or a better reputation.

My question is simply: How does being in university position (e.g. professor) aid the researchers who are at the highest level in their field? I do not mean being involved in academia, because one can be involved (eg attending seminars and lectures) without having a position (please correct me if I am wrong, as I myself am not actually in academia).

I have read about many great researchers in various fields who were not involved in academia throughout their lives. Some were involved in academia only part of their life, but almost invariably, their greatest work came after a period of solitude and isolation from others. In fact, most great mathematicians, for example, were rather isolated figures. Bernhard Riemann and Isaac Newton come to mind, but others like James Clerk Maxwell were also isolated during their periods of research. More recently, Andrew Wiles isolated himself for around 7 years and didn’t speak about his work to anyone while he was busy solving Fermat’s Last Theorem. (I have mentioned only mathematicians because those are the ones I have read about the most.)

Hence, I am failing to see how being in academia/a university position aids one as a researcher, practically speaking. It seems as though the greatest research must come from within the individual due to an intense and personal love and desire for the subject, rather than due to collaborating with others or being given a better position or whatever. In fact, such things seem to be the opposite: detrimental. They would make the person focus not on the subject but on paltry things like gaining more and more money or a better reputation.

My question is simply: How does being in university position (e.g. professor) aid the researchers who are at the highest level in their field? I do not mean being involved in academia, because one can be involved (eg attending seminars and lectures) without having a position (please correct me if I am wrong, as I myself am not actually in academia).

I am in the Humanities, and I have a rough idea about the general field I want to work in. I have identified several professors who also work in this field. However, I am not sure how I can now find a topic for my dissertation. I am reading and reading, but as of now, I do not have a great idea.

I was thinking of getting in touch with the professors who might be potential advisors, but I am not sure whether that’s a good idea considering I do not know my topic at all. I do not want to come across as naive – esp. since they are all at prestigious institutions.

If you think it is a good idea to get in touch, then I am still clueless about how to go about this, and what to write. I want to be honest but would like to avoid looking like a fool.

PS: I am in the Humanities, I think it’s important for this question.

The class and year has ended. I wanted to meet with a professor who served as a great mentor with me during this year. I wanted to thank her in person and discuss pedagogy. I unexplainably dissed her by leaving at the end of the last class without thanking her or saying goodbye.

Feeling great guilt and disappointment, I emailed her to set up a last chance meeting. She responded with a long winded email about how busy she was [possibly a polite-go-away], but suggested possible times a week later.
I responded, in a clearly selfish and urgent manner, that I was available after the dates she suggested.

She responded with a “ok Ethel… i will write to you when I’m finished this week.”

Upon further consideration, I feel that I might have come off as entitled to her time.
I’m considering taking back the meeting request and just writing a heartfelt email instead, possibly before she has a chance to attempt to set up a meeting.

Does anyone have advice?

I have been offered a Marie Curie Fellowship as a PhD researcher. That means I would be employed by the business school to carry out 3 years of a PhD project approved by European Commission. I would simultaneously have the status of a PhD student and a business school employee.

However, the business school is perhaps ranked around 9 to 10 in that country. A serious concern is if other (better ranked) schools in that country and in rest of Europe will look down upon my PhD just because it is not from the list of elite schools in Europe. This particular school is not ranked by 2 of the well known rankings, though it punches way higher than its size and overall reputation research-wise in a third ranking, which is often considered the most trusted by students embarking on PhD at a business school.

I know what the project is and who my supervisor will be. He is an active researcher, though I don’t know to what extent he would go on to support me during and after PhD.

The alternative is a regular PhD program, with a full scholarship at a pretty strong brand name within Europe (another country). However, its research ranking is not very good, but the overall impression of that school Europe-wide is impressive. The school overall features in top 30 worldwide in one of the rankings, but for research in my area of studies, it ranks between 100-150 by 2 rankings and about 200-250 by the third. This school is ranked 3rd-4th in its country and is known internationally for its MBAs et cetera, so at least recruiters would know the school. I don’t know what project I would eventually finalize and the supervisor I would get, but as they say, the chances of things going wrong are lower at a good school.

My goal: I am looking at a career in academia afterwards. Some professors I spoke with have hinted that it is often the name of the graduating school that gets you noticed. Could the mention of Marie Curie fellowship compensate for any weaknesses of the specific school I attend? If so, how do I overcome the reputation and get noticed when the recruiters are said to be interested in shortlisting based on the recognition / popularity of schools?

I asked my professor to write a LOR for me. She said she would in general be happy to do that. I am quite self-conscious and worried, I would like to send an email back and say thanks, but I don’t want to sound overly grateful. Since English isn’t my first language, I would like to ask you how you would write something like this. Or: Would you maybe not write back at all, since the professor’s email box must be super busy and sending a simple thank you email might annoy them more than anything else?

I’m so not sure about this, thanks a lot!

I am an undergraduate who did research at my university a little while back. It was funded by a non-profit research organization, and I was paid with this money, through the university. I worked alone, but received some advice from people I worked with along the way. At the end of my time with the group, I had a poster with my findings on it, and I was preparing to begin writing a paper on the material. Unfortunately, the head of the group was let go from the university for some some immoral behavior (I’m aware that this is vague, and it intentionally so), and the group was disbanded. The university said that they would try to help me find someone else that I could publish with, but that never happened.

So here I am, sitting on some work that I’m very proud of. I don’t want for it to go to waste, but I don’t know if publishing my findings with a different group, outside of my university, will be considered plagiarizing. Any advice?

Edit: removed a separate question, asking how to bring the research up in applications

A little background information:

Me and my classmates are all doing internships this year. There are about 30 of us and 8 teacher.
The teachers would visit the company of each intern and they spread these 30 visits over 3 dates.
About a week before each visits they post on google classroom who they would visit and how late.
After the first two visits were planned, they posted that that they would visit everybody else on the last date (which makes a lot of sense).
As usual they posted who they are gonna visit and how late. A few students quickly responded that they were missing on the list (even though this list should cover all non-visited students).
After a few days the teachers responded with a 4th date to visit on, but no explanation of what went wrong.

I would like to ask my teachers what went wrong, maybe I am not a certain list I should be on. In which case they might say “you can’t graduate cause you never did your internship, else you would be on this list”.

Main question:

How can I ask a teacher to explain what went wrong, to make sure there are no bigger issue that could have a negative impact on my study.