Current scientific databases hold papers that were published over the past few decades (I haven’t checked what is the oldest paper available, but I remember seeing papers from the 1960s, there might even be older papers than that which are cataloged in current databases – not talking about the principia…). One can come upon such old papers either when searching through a database or as a reference in a more recent paper.

My question is: how can I tell if a paper is too old such that I had better not rely on its findings while performing a more contemporary research?

(It probably differs between disciplines, so I’m looking for some general advice.)

I’m a master’s degree student. A professor of mine offered me work on some parts of his paper that I have good knowledge about, because of my background. He said he’ll pay me in return, and acknowledge me in his paper. I accepted and suggested a 10 EU/h work and he accepted. I suggested that rate mainly because this is my first experience of this kind (and hence, I don’t know the average payment rate) and I thought it would at least take 40 hours and the final money will be enough for me to minimally live where I live. Now it turns out that (I guess, unfortunately?) I was faster than I thought and the work was done in around 12 hours. At the same time, of course, I’m not going to lie about my work hours just for the money. What do you think I should do? I had counted on that money, and it seems that my speed is turning against me!

PS 1: He’s friendly with me; I’m just thinking bringing this up might make him feel I’m overstepping my friendship with him, and that’s the last thing I need him to think.

PS 2: The paper that he’s working on is part of a big university project that he’s here for. Accordingly, the payment will be done from the budget of the project, not his pocket (or maybe they’re the same?)

PS 3: The contract will be prepared by the university in a few days. If I ask him to raise the money and he accepts, he’ll probably be able to convince the university for that.

From what I know the “Methods” section is separate from the “Results” section in research articles.

Speaking of computer science research articles in field of computer networks, I found that most of them include “SIMULATION AND EVALUATION” section where the experiments were done using simulator and performance was evaluated. Also, in the same section “Results” where given.

In that sense, does the “Methods” section include “Simulation and Evaluation” as well? and the results of Simulation are in “Results” section?

What I am trying to figure is the “Methodology” part of such a research article.

I’m a master student. A professor of mine offered me to work on some parts of his paper that I have a good knowledge about, as of my background. He said he’ll pay me in return, and acknowledge me in his paper. I accepted and suggested a 10 EU/h work and he accepted. I suggested that rate mainly because this is my first experience of this kind (and hence, I don’t know the average payment rate) and I thought it would at least take 40 hours and the final money will be enough for me to minimally live where I live. Now it turns out that (I guess, unfortunately?) I was faster than I thought and the work is done in around 12 hours. At the same time, of course, I’m not going to lie about my work hours just for the money. What do you think I should do? I had counted on that money, and it seems that my speed is turning against me!

PS 1: He’s friendly with me; I’m just thinking bringing this up might make him feel I’m overstepping my friendship with him, and that’s the last thing I need him to think.

PS 2: The paper that he’s working on is part of a big university project that he’s here for. Accordingly, the payment will be done from the budget of the project, not his pocket (or maybe they’re the same?)

PS 3: The contract will be prepared by the university in a few days. If I ask him to raise the money and he accepts, he’ll probably be able to convince the university for that.

I have started my master’s degree and I am a fully funded student.
I want to get perfect marks and do my research perfectly.
What steps should I follow to become an outstanding student in my supervisor’s mind?
How can I be a perfect student?
I also have a class with him this semester. I am also doing research with him.

It really does matter to me to have a very good relationship with my supervisor.
Please, give me any advice that you think is useful.

I am a postdoc and currently co-supervising a novel PhD student who works very very slow and needs to be spoon-fed most of the time (which is reasonable considering she’s in early stages of her PhD). We are working on a very hot topic and have defined a research problem to work on. She has been working on it for 2 months, but I’m afraid we are going to miss out on publication due to her slow pace. I, however, can see where the work is going and can do it on my own very quickly and maybe get it published right way. This work is an incremental research on something I did before, but for the student to climb the learning curve, it will take a considerable time.

Thinking about this, I have two options:

  1. Let her take her time and do research as any usual PhD student but
    push her to be quicker (not sure how).
  2. Do the research work myself and get it published much sooner than pursuing option 1 above, and list her as a co-author.

Now option 1 gives the student a fair-go in risk of missing out to another research group that may be doing similar research. Even under this option, I’m not sure if the student will really do a fantastic job eventually.
Option 2 seems unethical to me because a student should have his/her time to learn and experiment, but will allow her to learn the publication process and contribute to the production of the paper.

What do you think I should do?

I noticed that in my field, studies involving testing with human subjects often only show a small number (N>=10) of them. While I understand that researchers are often limited on funding and time, I always thought studies like that would require a certain minimum of subjects far greater than that.

Different sources I found (e.g. this one p.3, this sample size calculator, or Wikipedia) seem to support that impression.

My field is audio signal processing, and the studies that caught my attention were about speech intelligibility, hearing comfort and other measures related to human hearing.

My question is:

Why do some studies only involve a small count of subjects when statistical theory suggests a high number of participants is required to make meaningful assertions?

(I assume that there is something I missed or something that got mixed up in my head, and I’d really like to find my error)

Please refer to the link
Prelude

My research paper is almost completed and I have submitted a draft to my boss recently. My research tenure ends on the end of July.

I was told (today) that I would not be allowed to utilise my affiliation with my current research institute for submission to a journal after the expiration of my tenure – this is fine.

What is not fine is that my boss has removed himself from this paper and has also advised that another co – author (a student who has recently graduated from the overarching faculty of this research institute) not be an author as she is neither a student nor an employee.

This leaves only me and a visiting scholar in this research institute on secondment on the paper. This means that the submission of this paper to a journal/ conference would not be one where either of us are affiliated with this research institute.

Why does this matter?

In this research project, we utilise confidential data accorded to us by a number of countries via a national agency.

What should I expect and how should I circumvent this?

Please refer to the link
Prelude

My research paper is almost completed and I have submitted a draft to my boss recently. My research tenure ends on the end of July.

I was told (today) that I would not be allowed to utilise my affiliation with my current research institute for submission to a journal after the expiration of my tenure – this is fine.

What is not fine is that my boss has removed himself from this paper and has also advised that another co – author (a student who has recently graduated from the overarching faculty of this research institute) not be an author as she is neither a student nor an employee.

This leaves only me and a visiting scholar in this research institute on secondment on the paper. This means that the submission of this paper to a journal/ conference would not be one where either of us are affiliated with this research institute.

Why does this matter?

In this research project, we utilise confidential data accorded to us by a number of countries via a national agency.

What should I expect and how should I circumvent this?