I am a lecturer having 6years of experience in Bangalore India . I have completed MSc Computer Science and currently pursuing M.Phil in Computer Science. I wanted to know what term is used in Germany for lecturer and the different ranks or designation given and will I get a job as professor or lecturer in Germany.I have knowledge of research. And what is the minimum salary I would get

Suppose you are in a tenure-track position in the US and lucky (or successful) enough to eventually get tenured.

The most important effect is obvious that you now have a permanent position. But what other effects are there? Does your salary increase automatically? Does your teaching load change? Do you get (additional) grad students? Are these changes negotiable?

PS: I am outside of the US system but interested in these facts for the purpose of comparison.

I’ve been offered a faculty position at a British university (Russel group). I’m slightly confused about the pay/salary. specifically, my questions are:

  1. I understand the single pay national spine (which is a point system), but each institution decides what point range would correspond to the grade of the post? for example, while at institution A, a point 44 position would be in grade 7, at institution B it would be grade 8? Is this a correct understanding?

  2. I found from UCU the spine for 2017-2018, for the point that I’m assigned, i see that my stated salary is a lot LESS than what is stated on this chart (and I’ve checked with my university, they do use this single spine chart). Therefore, I was wondering if the salary they told me is in fact AFTER income tax and national insurance (NI)? (i.e. the £ they quote me is in fact what I take home?). Or is this my wishful thinking? Or am I reading the wrong chart?

I’ve seen other posts on here noting that salary in the UK is not that negotiable (compared to north America). I was wondering if this is still true? for the record, I’ve already inquired with the University and they told me they’ve already assigned me the highest points possible given my experience.

Mostly I’m just trying to understand this pay grade and point system so I can make realistic calculation for my living arrangements.

thanks!

I had an interview for an administrative (IT) position at a very prestigious US university. I had a second phone interview with an HR representative who asked for my salary expectation. I gave my range, and the HR person gave me their range, whose maximum is 20% lower than my minimum. She asked me if I was interested in continuing the hiring process within their range, and I asked to give me a day to think over it.

This is an extremely interesting position for me, but the modest salary increase would make the move to another state hard.

I counted all, salary, benefits, relocation package, but still it seems a tight fit. The HR person said that they are kind of locked into that range, which I have a hard time believing.

I come from the nonprofit world but I am not used to negotiation tactics in academia. Is this just a negotiation trick? How should I respond to avoid down-selling me without stalling the process?

Thanks.

Update:

I found some salary grades from this institution from a couple of years ago, and indeed the range I was given was the midpoint of the published salary grade, which includes mostly positions lower than the one I am apply for.

Without sharing details with my HR interlocutor, I replied that from my research, given the responsibilities, I expected a different range, and she replied that the range is non-negotiable because it’s a nonprofit. Which I know is not true, because I myself work at a nonprofit.

So I could just walk out of the deal and see if they come back, but it would be a bummer to let it fall through without even a chance to get to a real offer. Or suck it up and go with their rate, and work toward a raise within the followig year or two, but it would be a tough start.

I have recently accepted a new academic position in the Netherlands. Netherlands has a generous so-called 30% rule for high skilled expats:

you are paying taxes only for the 70% of your income and the rest 30%
is given to you as a tax-free allowance. This, in practice, means
about 20% higher net salary.

I easily got this rule 2 years ago for another academic position again in NL. The duration for the 30% rule is 8 years so I should have it for the next 6 years and nobody from HR mentioned any plans from the government of reducing it. Unfortunately, yesterday I read in the news that Dutch government completed a draft proposal which reduces the 30% rule from 8 to 5 years. What is worth noting is that, in case the draft becomes a law (which most probably will, since this is the final proposal) will have a retroactive effect :

Concreet betekent dit dat het kabinet in het pakket Belastingplan 2019
zal voorstellen de maximale looptijd van de 30%-regeling met ingang
van 1 januari 2019 voor zowel nieuwe als bestaande gevallen met drie
jaar te verkorte
n
.​

One of the factors that made me accepted the new offer was the 30% rule for the remaining 6 years (I planned to buy house immediately). Now I see that this might not very well be true. What is even worse is that I turned down a great Research position (in a high tech company) offering about 60% more salary. I thought the 30% rule would partly compensate about it, but probably it will not.

I will not ask about the legal aspects of the draft law nor about the ethical dimension of this although you can see here what the relevant tax authorities say about shortening the period of 8 years.

Is it too late to turn down the academic offer? I have accepted it on e-mail but I haven’t signed anything yet and haven’t even seen the contract. If yes, what is the best way to do this?

Is anything similar happening to any other country and how do academics people deal with it?

Apparently, a lot of expats taking advantage of this rule get frustrated and set up an e-vote against the draft.

I received a post-doc offer in physics from a German University. The position has a fixed three-year term, which might be extended up to three more years. The original position description says that this is the A13 Z position, Akademischer Rat auf Zeit. It corresponds to a Beamter, or civil servant position. Since I am a foreigner, the inviting professor is asking, whether it would be OK for me to switch it to E13 instead (researcher), since my profile for the position in this case is not needed to be checked by the federal government and the documents would be prepared much faster and easier for the inviting University. The salary would then be increased, to match those of A13 (let’s assume the same net amount).

What are disadvantages and benefits of E13 compared A13 if one ignores the difference in the salary scale?

Which one is considered better in a long term?

Some more information on the personal situation:

  • Let’s assume I’d like to stay in Germany afterwards.

  • I’m going to marry before starting the position. My partner has two children from the previous marriage.

  • I am not a citizen of the EU or the Schengen group.

While learning about the different faculty jobs in France, I discovered that the two different ranks of faculty are subdivided in classes: maitre de conférence are sorted in “normal class” and “outstanding class”, while professors are sorted in “second class”, “first class”, “exceptional class”. You start in the lowest class and if you’re good you can be promoted.

From an outsider perspective I could not find any difference other than salary. However reading the history of these ranks they used to correspond to, I think:

  • maitre-assistant -> new maitre de conférence
  • old maitre de conférence -> professor “second class”
  • non-titular professor -> professor “first class”
  • professor titular of a chair -> professor “exceptional class”

Today, other than salary, does the class change anything? Does a higher class faculty have more weight with the university or something? More responsibility? Or is it purely financial?

While learning about the different faculty jobs in France, I discovered that the two different ranks of faculty are subdivided in classes: maitre de conférence are sorted in “normal class” and “outstanding class”, while professors are sorted in “second class”, “first class”, “exceptional class”.

From an outsider perspective I could not find any difference other than salary. However reading the history of these ranks they used to correspond to, I think:

  • maitre-assistant -> new maitre de conférence
  • old maitre de conférence -> professor “second class”
  • non-titular professor -> professor “first class”
  • professor titular of a chair -> professor “exceptional class”

Today, other than salary, does the class change anything? Does a higher class faculty have more weight with the university or something?

I graduated with a PhD after 2 years (I was very efficient) and even though I have already received my degree and moved out of town, I’m still getting a stipend deposited into my bank account. I contacted my advisor about it but my advisor didn’t reply at all, so I don’t know what to do about this. Is there a minimum funding requirement or something like that? Or is it just a mistake? What to do now?

After checking out PhD stipends offered by various UK universities, I’ve come to the conclusion that they are way below the average annual salary.

I realize now that this is normal. At Durham, for instance, the most competitive studentship is valued only at GBP 14,000+ annually.

Are there scholarships in the UK that pays as much as a particular city’s average annual salary?

Are there scholarships that are as generous as Vanier (CAD 50,000 annually) and Trillium (CAD 40,000 annually) in Canada?