A bit of an odd question, but I would like to search for a phrase in articles from Science (the journal). Yet I cannot do this on Google Scholar–if I specify in the advanced search that the source is Science or “Science,” I get results from all sorts of journals with the word “Science” in them. “Science Magazine” or any further specification yields zero search results. Furthermore, Science Magazine’s website search is terrible, and returns every article in the issue of an article containing a search term (my search is for “hierarchical model”).

Has anyone else run into this? Can anyone think of a search term trick that might help?

I am interested in other academics’ experiences with large experiments (especially something like the LHC). To what extent do the “engineers” who design and build the machine (solder electronics, assemble quadrupole magnets, etc) interact with “scientists” who determine the program (who might want to test their 11-dimensional model etc)? Do the two sides take an active interest in each other’s work and give constructive suggestions to one another? Are the technicians all hired locally? How many in the “engineering” camp have PhDs?

(It’s also possible to label the two groups “experimentalists” vs “theorists”, though for the former I really mean people involved in the construction and day-to-day operations – I’m not interested in semantics here)

While the Higgs was at a sigma of ~4, I heard that postdocs and PhD students at CERN could volunteer for maintenance and similar tasks, and that those who did would have their names on the “Higgs paper” (hence the notoriously large author lists). Was this true and is it still the case?

I am interested in other academics’ experiences with large experiments (especially something like the LHC). To what extent do the “engineers” who design and build the machine (solder electronics, assemble quadrupole magnets, etc) interact with “scientists” who determine the program (who might want to test their 11-dimensional model etc)? Do the two sides take an active interest in each other’s work and give constructive suggestions to one another? Are the technicians all hired locally? How many in the “engineering” camp have PhDs?

(It’s also possible to label the two groups “experimentalists” vs “theorists”, though for the former I really mean people involved in the construction and day-to-day operations – I’m not interested in semantics here)

While the Higgs was at a sigma of ~4, I heard that postdocs and PhD students at CERN could volunteer for maintenance and similar tasks, and that those who did would have their names on the “Higgs paper” (hence the notoriously large author lists). Was this true and is it still the case?

I am interested in assistant professor positions in physics at teaching-focused universities in the US. New faculty in these positions may have 2 or 3 courses to teach. I have heard that preparing to teach classes for the first time takes an immense amount of time (~80 hours per week). Is this accurate or exaggerated?

How long would you expect to prepare a class that you haven’t taught before?

I am interested in assistant professor positions in physics at teaching-focused universities in the US. New faculty in these positions may have 2 or 3 courses to teach. I have heard that preparing to teach classes for the first time takes an immense amount of time (~80 hours per week). Is this accurate or exaggerated?

Edit for clarity:
How long would you expect to prepare a class that you haven’t taught before?

(Note: I am currently a student at a tech school and otherwise unemployed. I’ve never been a scientist or published a paper.)

So I am a little skeptical of some results I have been hearing about experiments using computer simulations, and I would like to at some point do my own experiment. (For some people the topic is one of those differences_in_gender, homosexuality, global_warming, etc. topics that can often provoke more emotions than rational.) Any ways I figured that I should probably do as much research as I before I do any experiment. On the other hand if I learn how exactly the others did their experiment that would bias how I construct mine. I would be prone to solving problems by doing the same thing rather than coming up with a new way to test it. Furthermore, it might be best to avoid reading any emotional rhetoric that I come upon, as it might further biases I have.

On the other hand research is boring, (stressful), and lacks any immediate progress or definitive end. This wouldn’t be the first time I’ve tricked myself into not doing work. I am an expert at doing that.

So does it make any sense to limit the amount of research into a experiments for the sake of more diverse testing, or should I try to find out as much as I can?

(Apologies if this isn’t the right place for such a post. I see lots of advice for undergraduates hoping to pursue research in math and science, but haven’t come across anything for the “soft” stuff like their history and pedagogy.)

I’m an undergrad math student (will have one more term left after the summer) and I’m hoping to get some advice on summer plans. While I really like math, and I’m considering grad school, I’ve always been really interested in science education, science in pop culture, and the history of science. I love the book A Short History of Nearly Everything and Youtube channels like Vsauce. Working as a science writer or museum curator would probably be a dream job for me. I’m hoping to do something in that realm in the future.

Does anyone know of any good ways to get involved in this sort of thing? It seems like people in this arena come from a pretty wide range of backgrounds. When I think about the parts of math and science that I really like, I keep coming back to the historical, cultural, philosophical, and pedagogical aspects, so something along those lines would be awesome.

I’m living in Canada right now, but I’d love to travel so I’m open to any location. I also have good grades (just under 4.0), if that matters for anything. That said, I’m really open to anything, academia or otherwise.

~~~

If anyone has any suggestions I would be very grateful. Thanks in advance!

I have a thought experiment and a hypothesis. They belong to the field of optics and thermodynamics. And I want to publish them in a scientific journal.
I would like to ask which scientific journals are suitable for me to publish my thought experiment and hypothesis? Because I find that many scientific journals only publish papers on empirical research while my paper is a thought experiment and a hypothesis.

There are many international rankings for universities (e.g. QS ranking). However, I am interested in an science institute ranking or list that does not involve universities.

Let me give you an idea of what I am searching for: I am from Germany and I know that a major part of scientific progress is happening in universities. Nevertheless there are institutions such as Max-Planck-Institute for Mathematics (Germany), or German Aerospace Center (DLR), or Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel), or CERN (Switzerland), or Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (Canada), with great significance in science. These institutions do not appear in any ranking, any list of science institutes, or my Google search for “science institutes“.

So where can I find a list of such institutions, e.g. by subject?

Question background: (1) I am curious in general to find a list/ranking that includes such non-teaching institutions too. (2) I went for several internships to science institutes, e.g. DLR/CERN. I am in my bachelor studies and currently searching for new internship opportunities during the summer vacation period. There are a lot of great opportunities in Germany, but I would like to spend this summer in some foreign institute (that is not an university) – to gain international experiences and because German scholarships (ironically) only financially support internships that are in foreign countries. However, in this context I am struggling to find such institutes… For example: I was looking for science institutes in Japan, but I only found the main universities.