Inspired by this question, I have a similar but somehow different problem.

I recently assumed a tenure-track position. One of my strategies for a visible start is to have a strong presence in social media. We have a youtube channel in which students regularly explain their achievements. Or sometimes we post short educational materials. We also prepare brief videos for each publication as some publishers promote the videos.

However, one of my PhD students refuse to cooperate. I specifically asked him in the interview (both video chat and email questionnaire) if he is willing and ready to prepare such video materials for the group, and he firmly answered YES. Now, he claims it is not part of the job description for a PhD.

I first preferred to ignore this conflict, but now other students are reluctant to do so. Now it is more a matter of my authority.

Since I am new, I do not want to take the case to the department head or other officials.

Is the creation of youtube content/lectures in your field worth showing off on an Academic CV?

In the most extreme case: if someone who is considering hiring for a teaching position in a university/college is looking at two candidates who are identical in qualifications except for one candidate having a youtube channel which teaches topics in his/her field (with somewhat decent content) would that candidate be considered more “qualified” (in the broadest sense of the word).

I received a mail today from Academia.edu (a site I wasn’t previously aware of), asking me to confirm that I co-authored a paper with a colleague.

Having looked into it a little it sounds like it might be a useful site – the idea of a “social network for scientists” is one I’ve seen the need for in the past. However, partly due to bad experiences with the seemingly similar ResearchGate, I’m also skeptical.* Without signing up for an academia.edu account the site doesn’t offer much information, so I would like the following information:

  1. What specific features does academia.edu offer to its users?

  2. Is it genuinely useful for any of the following purposes (each of which seems genuinely needed)

    1. as a platform for networking with academics
    2. for discovering relevant research
    3. as an effective system for post-publication peer review
    4. for organising references among a small team of people working on a project
  3. Will it send out mails to my colleagues without my express and explicit permission? (I.e. are the mails I received today the result of a deliberate action by my colleague, who is aware that I will be emailed and wishes me to join the site; or are they essentially spam from a social networking site aggressively trying to expand its user base?)

  4. It’s clear from its Wikipedia page that it’s a private, venture-capital funded company. What is its business model?

In short, is this a site that has some genuine utility for academics, or should I just ignore it?

*I’ve never signed up for ResearchGate but I regularly receive spam from it purporting to be from my colleagues, who aren’t aware that it’s being sent on their behalf. I would be mortified if my senior colleagues received such mails claiming to be from me, so I won’t touch it with a barge pole.

Working on my Master’s Thesis in Geography, and it is fairly standard to provide a “Study Area” section that describes the location of study.

  • I. Introduction
  • II. Study Area
  • III. Methods

I have some basic summary statistics about the Twitter data that I collected, such as the number of users from which tweets were collected using Method A in a specific geographic area as well as summary statistics, but also the count of users from tweets collected using a separate method, Method B for collection.

I would like to include this contextual data in this section, however it seems inappropriate to reference a method not yet introduced in the paper, would it be?
Additionally, what would be an appropriate way to do this.

I maintain a Facebook account purely for research purposes. I have about 30 or so friends on my account. I have always disagreed with FB and its ethics, however, recently, in the light of the CA scandal I have found myself increasingly questioning my use of the site.

The benefits that FB provide to the researcher of virtual communities are undoubtedly strong. Much of my master’s research focused on virtual communities in Iraq and Syria, and much of this would have been impossible without FB. However now I am considering deleting my account in the wake of these – unsurprising – revelations.

As a PhD student, the benefits of being part of an online social community are notable. As a Linux user and a supporter of Free and Open Source Software I also have to wrestle with the occasional difficulties of trying to get software to work which Windows or Macs users would breeze through with ease, but I am happy to do so because of my support for free software and the additional learning/skills I inherit.

Maintaining an ethical standard re software and software companies becomes increasingly difficult in the modern climate. Does one just put one’s ethical beliefs on the back burner in the interests of research and should one be perpetually plagued with the decisions one has made to maintain a FB account in spite of disagreeing strongly with the company? Or does one delete one’s account and potentially miss out on the great research opportunities it provides?

I maintain a Facebook account purely for research purposes. I have about 30 or so friends on my account. I have always disagreed with FB and its ethics, however, recently, in the light of the CA scandal I have found myself increasingly questioning my use of the site.

The benefits that FB provide to the researcher of virtual communities are undoubtedly strong. Much of my master’s research focused on virtual communities in Iraq and Syria, and much of this would have been impossible without FB. However now I am considering deleting my account in the wake of these – unsurprising – revelations.

As a researcher, the benefits of the online social world are massive. As a Linux user and a supporter of Free and Open Source Software I also have to wrestle with the occasional difficulties of trying to get software to work which Windows or Macs users would breeze through with ease, but I am happy to do so because of my support for free software and the additional learning/skills I inherit.

Maintaining an ethical standard re software and software companies becomes increasingly difficult in the modern climate. Does one just put one’s ethical beliefs on the back burner in the interests of research and should one be perpetually plagued with the decisions one has made to maintain a FB account in spite of disagreeing strongly with the company? Or does one delete one’s account and potentially miss out on the great research opportunities it provides?

I just received an email from Peerus “letting me know” that my paper was published. While it sells itself as a paper monitoring app, better than google scholar, it does seem to be closer to academia.edu.

I do find deceptive in their email the large orange button with Find your papers on peerus followed in small by by clicking you accept our TCU.

Also I don’t understand how they want to monetize their product. The website claims to be free (for researchers) but does not give any additional information.

So does someone has experience with their service? How do they compare with google scholar / academia.edu (which seems to have a bad rep as seen in this question Is Academia.edu useful?)?

I am in a very frustrating situation. My article is under review for almost 8 months and I didn’t hear any response. The average review time for the journal is 3 months. The journal is highly reputed journal, and based on the average time one can expect a response within 2.5 to 4.5 months.
I sent several emails to Editor in Chief (EiC) but I receive same answer, a kind of auto response. Moreover, according to journal policy I can not know the name or contact information of Associate Editor (AE).
The EiC is with me on various social media plateforms like Linkedin and facebook. We had few conversations on various topics, but I never told him about my article.
The question is can I discuss status of my article with EiC on social media in informal text messaging?
Is it ethical and fair? I want to expatiate the review process to same level as journal average time shows. I don’t want to get an unfair advantage.