In the United States, if anyone, be it a relative, a colleague, potential employer, or colleague, requests to the pertinent department, in the university I study/ied in, certain information about myself, will they be able to have it?

Is all this information, such as grades, year, internships I applied to, if I live(d) in a fraternity or dorms, etc., under the same regulation; or does each of them have its own set of restrictions regarding disclosure?

Finally, does that still apply to international students and/or people who have already graduated and thus are no longer in the institution? There is indeed the Buckley Amendment (FERPA), but it only covers educational records.

Simply put, if anyone, be it a colleague, relative, potential employer, or colleague, requests to the pertinent department, in the university I study/ied in, certain information about myself, will it be able to have it?

These informations, such as grades, year, internships I applied to, if I live(d) in a fraternity or dorms, etc, are all under the same regulation; or do each of them have their own set of restriction regarding disclosure?

Finally, does that still apply to international students and/or people who have already (under)graduated and thus are no longer in the institution? There is indeed the Buckley Amendment (FERPA), but it only covers educational records.

PS: regarding USA norms

I was recently accepted into a graduate biophysics program and have a couple questions about what I should expect going into my first semester. While I’m going into a physics PhD, I’d like general advice from any field. I have two specific questions, but welcome any advice that you are willing to share.

What is the biggest thing to overcome/accomplish during your first semester and a graduate student? Looking back, what is something you wish you would have done differently?

Suppose, a student left a negative comment about a professor in the university’s confidential review page. Somehow the professor guesses who the student was.

What can the student do if the professor intentionally gives the student bad grades?

Can the student file a request for a exam paper review to the dean?

How would the whole situation work out for the student?

As a final year student (B.Sc.) I wrote a paper, but didn’t keep my supervisor as co-author since he hadn’t contributed at all (in research and paper-writing). I am about to submit my paper to a journal(single-blind peer review).

Does the chance of being accepted a paper to a journal increase if one of the Co-Author is Ph.D./Professor ?

Should one keep his thesis supervisor as co-author for above?

I mean, is there a chance that the reviewer will consider my paper a bit differently/lightly/neglectfully ?

I recently submitted an article to a relatively well-known emerald journal.

After 1 day from the first submission, the status of my article has been shown as “Awaiting for AE recommendation”, and after 5 days, today my status is”Awaiting for AE decision”.

it means reject?

I am teaching a course in a college and assignment homework on a regular basis. Usually I collect all homework in the class and later my student secretary grades all the homework and return them to the students through the mail room. If a student did not turn in the homework at all, a zero will be given.

There is a student who claims to have turned in two homework but got zero for both. I am checking with my secretary and is awaiting for his reply. Likely he will tell me that he does remember anything about her homework. Also I have asked the student to check her mailbox, and it is quite likely that she could not find her homework there.

Another piece of information: I suspect the student is dishonest as sometimes her quiz answer is identical to the student sitting next to her. But since I never caught her red-handed, this should not be used as an evidence.

Now assuming that no evidence can be found regarding whether she turned the homework or not, there are at least three opinions for me:

  1. Give her full marks for the homework, assuming that it is I or my secretary who misplaced them.
  2. Give her zeros, ignoring her claims.
  3. As a happy medium, change her homework status as “excused” so these two particular homework will not be counted toward her grade.

I have done Option 1 in the past, but only to find out later that the student who made the claim turns out to be a very dishonest student and likely she lied to me and benefited from lying. What would you suggest me to do in this situation?

My undergraduate students are going to present their group works to the whole class. I would like that their companions globally and anonymously evaluate them, so that each team can in situ get a grade for their work in this way (besides the evaluation they would get from me as teacher).

My questions are if someone can provide some previous experience about this evaluation strategy (either as a teacher or as a student); and which app or tool could be used for this purpose (i.e. so that the class can vote and we instantly know the points for each team).

During the last semester my supervisor Prof. X held a seminar for bachelor and master students (mostly computer scientists). According to the study regulations the students have to

  • give scientific presentations (based on journal or conference papers) and
  • hand in seminar papers on the topic of their presentation (i.e. their papers should cover the results of the original paper, lay out details of proofs, add additional explanations or examples, etc.).

The final grade consists of 2/3*presentation + 1/3*paper.

Prologue.
At the beginning of the semester Prof. X’s research assistants compiled a list of interesting research papers. At the first seminar meeting the students were able to choose the paper they would like to present to the rest of the group at the end of the semester. Furthermore Prof. X made it very clear that understanding the topic is just a portion of presenting and writing down scientific ideas. Every student was assigned to a seminar supervisor to whom they could talk when they ran into problems.
Half-way through the semester there was an obligatory meeting with the supervisor and a deadline for handing in a draft of the presentation slides. At the end of the semester we organized a little “conference” and the students presented “their” papers. Afterwards, they received written feedback on their presentations from all participants (students, research assistents, and Prof. X). Six weeks later they had to hand in their seminar papers.

Problem.
Unfortunately the quality of many seminar papers is relatively poor; even the papers handed in by students who had understood their topic “quite well” and had given good presentations are surprisingly different from what we expected.

Main issues:

  1. Even though they were allowed to use their native language, many papers had bad spelling (obviously no spell checker was used) and bad grammar.

  2. In some cases it was impossible to understand the basic ideas if one had not already been familiar with the subject.

  3. Imprecise language and almost no sources cited, e.g. “Algorithm Y is rather efficient in comparison with other algorithms.” [citation needed].

  4. Some students only cited a single source (= “their” research paper).

Questions.
How should we address these issues? Of course, we are going to give some feedback on their seminar papers. I am worried about the next seminar. Reading all these papers was (mentally) exhausting. Should we require that seminar papers must be handed in first? How could we install an iterative feedback process?

I am looking forward to your ideas and experiences.

Context: I am an assistant professor of mathematics at a small liberal-arts college in the US.

I did my graduate work at a large public university, and there I rarely encountered students who had previously taken a class from me, let alone ones who had failed one of my courses. Now that I’m at a much smaller institution it happens somewhat frequently, and I’ve only finished one semester here!

At this time I have no idea how I should react to these encounters. Generally former students and I exchange a pleasant greeting, but I find myself instinctively trying to avoid students who’ve failed because I’m afraid that they are still angry at me, I don’t want them to feel bad, etc.

The title of my question says it all: How should I react when encountering students who have failed one of my courses? I could simply treat them like any other student, but I’m concerned about reinforcing the stereotype of “the tone-deaf mathematician with poor social skills.”

Perhaps this question is a better fit for the interpersonal stack exchange, but I figured I’d start here.